Basset Hounds Forum banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,319 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Our vet is recommending pulling our pup's lower two canine teeth to correct an overbite. He states this should be done sooner rather than later and this will allow her lower jaw to grow correctly- He also said when the adult canines come in she will be fine. Has anyone had experience with this and if so what are your thoughts?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,960 Posts
How old is the pup? What's the breeder say about it?

According to the breed standard the basset hound should have an even bite or scissors bite. Overshot or Undershot is a fault. But if you're not going to show your dog in confirmation it shouldn't matter.

My dogs when they were young puppies have been slightly overshot at eight weeks and all ended up with a scissors bite. The lower jaw grows more slowly than the upper show so if you have a young pup I doubt the fact that it has an overbite is going to be a problem. How big a space is there between the upper and lower teeth? I'd be more concerned if the pup were severely undershot.

I've heard of baby teeth being pulled but this was done by breeders (not bassets)that wanted to increase the chances for a correct bite. I'd say this was a "no, no" according to AKC rules.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,319 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Not planning to show for conformation- but would love to train this one in agility- She will be 8 weeks and the two lower canines are cutting into her upper palate. I can wait- but he said this would give her lower jaw time to grow more as it should- about all I can find doing a search relates to increased risk for peridontal disease as they get older.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,902 Posts
For more on extraction of deciduous teeth, see Interceptive Orthodontics.

From "Selected Canine Malocclusions"
Linguoversion of lingual displacement of the mandibular canine commonly referred to as "base narrow canines" is common in doliocephalic dogs and is thought to be the result of retained deciduous teeth. This malocclusion can be insidious, in that it is easily missed by casual observance by owner and practitioner alike. These animals often present with dysphagia if the problem goes unnoticed or uncorrected. The base narrow canines can damage the palate, cause pain, and possibly oronasalfistuli. They also may contact the maxillary canines and cause attrition.[/b]
Source
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,319 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Thank you so much for the information! I printed out the articles and decided on getting a second opinion. I drove little Cuddy 30 minutes across town to a different vet clinic- I've never used them before but they have a good reputation in town and I've seen some of their vets in the ER with Jake several times. The vet we saw used to raise bassets so is quite familiar with the breed. He said he would do absolutely nothing to Cuddy's teeth. The overbite is mild and he felt it would self correct in a few weeks. The small indents in the roof of her mouth were not causing problems and as long as she was eating he would recommend leaving her alone. He did recommend rechecking them at her next check up to see if things had gotten worse... but said he would be shocked if they did. He also gave her a thorough look over- heart, lungs, tummy, ears, and hips and pronounced her a stunning example of a perfect basset. So I feel better. I called and cancelled her surgery (didn't tell them I got another opinion)- just that we were very uncomfortable with anesthesia at her age and would like to watch her for now. Thanks! You guys are awesome!
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top