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If you want to take a picture without the flash reflecting, you'll either have to turn off the flash or dont aim the camera directly on her so the flash wont directly hit her eyes and come back. The flash reflection you are seeing is not like red eye, which has a solution. Red eye occurs when a flash goes off so fast that your pupils dont have time to close enough. The red is actually the blood in the back of the eye and retina. Thats why most cameras have that double or triple flash before actually taking a picture, because it gives your pupils more time to close. (Dogs can get red eye too...but the same thing fixes it.) All canines (and cats and lots of other animals) have what is called a tapetum lucidum. These animals evolved to hunt at dusk and night time when there are low light levels. The tapetum is a reflective layer in the back of the eye that unabsorbed reflects light back so it has another chance of being absorbed, therefore increasing the light seen by the eye and seeing a better picture of the bunny hopping through the grass! We don't see it in pictures of humans because we don't have them.


This from the graduate student who just wrote a paper on vision in dogs....
Hope it helps!
 

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Actually 90% of all the pics I take of Ruby has the orphan annie eyes (all white) from the flash of the camera, not the pic I sent on the original post.

I want to take pics of her looking at me and I notice that most of you can do that without the eyeball/flash problem.

Ideas?
 

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Actually 90% of all the pics I take of Ruby has the orphan annie eyes (all white) from the flash of the camera, not the pic I sent on the original post.

I want to take pics of her looking at me and I notice that most of you can do that without the eyeball/flash problem.

Ideas?
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with a ditgital camera don't use flash you can edit contrast and brightness after or buy a remore flash and bounce the flash off the ceiling not directly at the dog. if using a traditional camera with film you can again forgo the flash if an automatic it will adjust, get the fast film possible ASA 800 or higher. Picture will be a bit grainer with high speed film but it is better than red/green eye. Also many digital cameras have a red eye reduction feature. It is basically two fashes the first fash causes the pupils to dialate so the red eye is less noticable, it may work on humans but not really effect for dog/cats.
 

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Also many digital cameras have a red eye reduction feature. It is basically two fashes the first fash causes the pupils to dialate so the red eye is less noticable, it may work on humans but not really effect for dog/cats.
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Red eye reduction flashes don't cause the pupils to dilate, but to contract. It would work on getting rid of red eye in dogs and cats, however you'll rarely see the red eye in dogs and cats because the reflection of the flash from the tapetum is so much brighter you are effectively bleaching out the red eye.

Your best bet is to just turn off the flash, or aim so Ruby's eyes aren't directly on center. You can still have her looking at the camera lens without the flash aiming directly into her eye. If the flash doesn't aim directly into her eye, the reflecting light wont go back towards the camera, and then wont be in the picture

:)
 
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