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Browsing the web I came across an article focused on those who are interested in breeding posted on the BHCSC webpage 2013 by Sandi Wittenberg. She said she was told that at a breeders seminar. Just wondering what you all think, and if you agree? Here is a capture of the paragraph....
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I think it's probably a realistic number, especially if you take into account those that don't really care for their bitches and puppies and "let nature take it's course". But even caring breeders will lose puppies for the reasons mentioned above and more. Most of the time I successfully raise the entire litter, but there have been losses and they are heartbreaking. Don't breed if you can't handle losing a puppy (and potentially the mother, that happens too). I'm always nervous when expecting a litter.
 

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I have no interest in breeding a litter, but that average seems high to me based on experience with other breeds. I was just wondering if Basset genetic issues lead to a higher percentage of puppy death.
 

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I thought it was high too, I think I've lost maybe 5% (I'd have to check), but while there are many good breeders who will do everything they can to make sure they pups survive, there are also many who let their bitches whelp on their own and don't supervise, so they lose pups to complications and to being crushed or otherwise injured by the dam that might have been preventable. There's also the fact that many small breeds are more delicate, puppies tinier and more easily lost. If you have a litter of two and lose one, that's a 50% loss. If I have a litter of 6 and lose one, that's a loss of 16%.

Certainly the ones I've lost were not to breed-health-specific issues. One issue is mechanical (large breed bitches can often lay on and crush/suffocate puppies, which is why I supervise 27/7 for the first 2-3 weeks). Inertia and stuck puppies can happen in any breed. Accidents can happen to any breed. I've found Basset Hounds to be pretty healthy overall.
 

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27/7 sounds right to me! Thanks for finding the source of that statistic. I know of a breeder...another breed...who will not help a weak pup feed...doesn't want to interfere with Mother Nature. Obviously, as a rescue type I am all about intervening when I can make a difference. Right now we are down to one Basset, and she is elderly with some serious health issues. Also have a 19 yr old cat who is failing. Am thinking we might go for a little boy to show next time, but I am still learning. Just would love a HEALTHY companion for a change.
 

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If you accept that 30% could be about right having included those poorly bred, imagine if puppy farms were included (guess you must have them). Puppy farms here wouldn't even admit how many breeding bitches they have, 90+, & their loss's must be frightening.
 

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high loss is not economically feasible. We are finding in studies for the health of the bitch and litter many of the practices general abhorred by reputable breeders and the general public is actual healthier for pups and damn. Ie breeding early and often and stop breeding when litter size start to diminish ie nearing middle age.
 

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Wouldn't be impressed with a breeder whose primary interest was 'economical'.

'Breeding early and often and stop breeding when litter size start to diminish ie nearing middle age'

Sounds more like a production line, similar to a dog being repeatedly used at stud only to find that he's got hereditary problems but by then too late.
 

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sounds like a production line but that is how dogs(birches) and puppies are healthiest. Much as a lot of the growing problem in the developed world with increase in autism, and other childhood developmental disorders is from having children latter in life.

It is healthier for the bitch involved and the puppies produced to breed early ie 2 years of age vs 5) and every heat cycle provided the bitch did not suffer any trauma or severe complication during the pregnancy through weaning of pups.

"The study followed 5 colonies of dogs (labs, min-pin, 2 other purebreds and 1 group of lab mixes) in the college research breeding program. 1/2 of each colony was bred every single heat cycle, 1/2 skipped every other one.

After they were finished breeding, the bitches were spayed and their uterus dissected. Those showing most stress, and damage were the ones that had been skipped, since it is NATURAL in the wild for dogs to be bred EVERY HEAT CYCLE it is what their bodies were meant to do.

The SCIENTISTS and DOG EXPERTS explained that the skip every other heat program was an myth, probably started by people trying to impose their human emotions on to their dogs. Women try to get back their girlish figure between pregnancies, and that is not a priority for dogs."

https://www.facebook.com/AmericanLibertyKennels/posts/423908754330384
"Recently at an AKC Dog Breeding Symposium held at Michigan State University with key note speaker Dr. Claudia Orlandi Ph.D. (AKC's breeder of the year and author of The ABC's of Dog Breeding) shocked many breeders when it was disclosed that there have been scientific studies to show that it is detrimental for bitches to skip heat cycles. It was shared that once you have begun to mate a bitch that you should NOT skip any heat cycles until she is completely finished breeding. A bitch is said to be "finished" breeding when her litter size is drastically decreased. The study involved following females that were bred every heat cycle and females that were bred every other heat cycle. After they were "finished" breeding, the bitches were spayed and their uterus dissected. Those showing most stress, and damage of the uterus were the females that were bred "every other" heat cycle. Part of the rational that skipping heat cycles is harmful stems from the fact that with consecutive heat cyclesthere is no "flushing action" of the uterus, that normally occurs by having a litter of puppies.The female will go through Estrus no matter if she is bred or not and by breeding a healthy bitch back to back,can lesson the chances of the female experiencing pyometra, infections and false pregnancys. The choice to breed or not, should be contingent upon the goals the breeder has and for sure the mental and physical health of the female, above all else. The important information to take away from this study, is that a breeder with healthy females, does have "choices"."


We’re breeders – why are we anti-breeding? | Ruffly Speaking
 
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