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I have a friend that has a cabin in western PA. She lets her Husky run on her property, which is quite large. She wants me to bring my dogs there and let them run. NOPE, not doing it. They will be on a leash. I just don't want to take that chance!
 

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That is just being smart. I know how quick Grace could sniff out a chipmunk and go after it, I could stop her, BUT, she wouldn't stop at the first "NO" because she would never hear me,all her brain functions were on sensory overload chasing down the thing running from her. A second "NO" would slow her down but she would have already crossed the road(if it went that way) the third 'NO" she would stop. Fortunately , the third "NO" didn't come too late or she would have been dead by a passing car. You can have them spayed and neutered but you cannot cut off the part that causes all the problems from counter surfing to taking off with their nose to the ground. You can guess what that is. For an Obedience trained dog you may stand a better chance,but, I have seen obedience dogs leave the ring, so even then, there is a chance. If I had an extremely well trained basset, and there are some ,I would feel more comfortable about them being off lead . Mine will always be on a lead.
 

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They are allowed in my front yard w/myself or hubby (not even allowed in the driveway and we live on a dead end that has barely anyone coming/going), going in/out of my parent's house, and when we go to my hubby's family's land they are off lead. They both come right back w/first warning, and we test their recall regularly to keep them alert to our commands. We don't need treats or anything for them to listen, I feel lucky that they are so good.
 

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Our hounds are only off leash in two areas:

In any area that is fenced in. Dog parks, backyards and the like.

The only place that they are allowed off leash and unfenced is at my parent's house WAY out in the middle of nowhere. And while they are off leash there they have strict supervision by myself or my husband. I can say that my dogs are stubborn enough that e-collars aren't enough of a deterrent if there is any small furry animals running from them. We tried e-collars in the past and they simple didn't work. In fact it was more like a rocket booster and caused them to run in the same direction faster. I think the only thing that keeps our hounds from taking off at my mom and dad's is their desire to be with my parent's dogs which are much more inclined to listen and come when called.

Any other time, we just don't take the risk of letting them off leash. It only takes a split second to go from slug to bullet dog speed and have them get hit by a car. I would much rather deal with a slightly unhappy basset on a leash than having my heart ripped out because they were hurt.
 

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Apologies for bumping old threads. I just came across the site.

I've had my basset for 5 months (he's a 4 year old reacue). I didn't know they don't do so well off leash. To my surprise, I let him go at an off leash park and he bolted (luckily there are quite a few in my area that are fenced).
I didn't stop taking him, instead I would put him back on the leash when he wasn't coming back to me. After doing this a dozen times or so, he sticks by my side during our walks. I had go grab something out of my car yesterday and he sat at the fence and waited for me to get back.
I was at a dog play group yesterday and was told this is rare for the breed and that will not work for most bassets, but it's certainly worth trying!
 

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Well done you (for getting this far with your off-lead hound). Going right back to our first hound, I well remember taking him into a big Park (in St.Albans UK) and letting him off. Yes he followed his nose. I'd hide behind a big tree, keeping an eye on him and where he was. Eventually he'd stop tracking and turn to look for me - PANIC! You could see it on his face - oh heck, mum's vanished. After him, and we did get a reasonable recall, entered our second so we then had 'a pack'. After which we headed for Canada and let them off lead in suitable places. Hum. At least the first gave tongue on a scent so we could hear him .... and eventually they'd come back but it was risky as they'd take off towards the 'north pole' on occasion. As our numbers grew, we did have a pack so having them running loose was okay as the older ones behaved, bringing the younger ones along with them. Only a few times did we drop one and had to take the bulk back to the car while we went back to pick up the 'strays'. I hated it when those who never made sound were loose.

You are right re bringing your hound back to you and not always putting him back on the lead. We did this with one girl who took off (UK this time) after deer. I'd stopped the others, but she was not for stopping. Eventually she came back so my husband who I'd left to go after her, picked her up, but after that episode, when she was quite young, I kept her on a lead for some weeks before trying her again, bringing her back to me and sending her off again with the others so she didn't get to think she came back and I'd put her on her lead.

Unfortunately with those who have a strong hunting instinct, they will let their nose rule their head so you really need to try to be one step ahead. That first hound, running loose in one of the many ravines in and around Toronto, found a hot scent and so focused he was on it, ran right into my husband's legs as he stood in the way!! Such fun.
 
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