Basset Hounds Forum banner

1 - 20 of 26 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,780 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I see that Maggie May had the same ?? I did, so decided to start this new thread.

I kept reading to not let basset hounds off leash, as they might follow a scent and are not always good about coming back.

but we live in an area that has a lot of parks and beaches where people let their dogs run off leash all the time. so here I am with Worm on a leash while the other dogs are running around him trying to play with him. Worm can only run as fast as his person, which is not that fast per dog standards:confused: plus i can see it may not be that safe to have him on the leash when he's playing like that.

Have people been successful training their bassets to go off leash? And if so, how? all ideas appreciated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Off Leash

Just got back after a lovely walk thought I would try and wear him out and then attempt off lead - but hey ho here we go again he just does not seem to hear me!! :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
160 Posts
I agree it's not the best idea. It might work one time, then the next they smell something. When we first got Woofus we were at doggie park. Loaded him up in the car, and in a split second he jumped out past me and took off. I was soooo worried. In 10 mins I got a call from a lady at the golf course. She said she's about 1 mile away....and she works at the snack shack. hahahahahaha.

We have let him off leash at dog beach, but I do that cause Woofus loves chasing dogs and there's so many there that he doesn't want to run away. Maybe just practice with Worms recall for awhile and see how he does.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Bert is so unpredictable and yes if there are other dogs around I stand a good chance of catching up with him - but I worry about him not getting enough exercise whilst I keep him on his leash ?? thankyou for your response (am still learning about this website!)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,557 Posts
yeah we hounds love to just follow our noses.
sometimes we follow it cuz something smells so good and interesting and then when we're done following we don't know where we are and that gives moms and dads a skared. I don't like parents with a skared so i stay on a leash. I don't wanna get lost or hurt cuz that'll make moms and dads have a cry. I cry enough for all of us.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,856 Posts
We use the playground at a closed elementary school nearby. Its all fenced in and he can run to his heart's content. He comes back when he gets thirsty. Can't go right now though. The snow is over his head.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
129 Posts
You can start with one of those super long leash and work with your recall in a fenced in area. I have being working with Porter on his recall every since I adopted him last summer and he is pretty good. I carry special treats such as piece of cheese with me when we go out and every time I call him to come back, I kneel down so he can see me kneeling. He would know thats the signal for 'cheese' and he would come back. But if he knows I have no food, he'll just ignore me. Haha the little jerk. Thats the best I can do so far.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,169 Posts
I to am new to the sight.I have had 4 bassets in my life and all could be off leash.I think that maybe it's where I live because I live in the country and we get to go walking in the hills and Mountains all the time.Even when I lived in town(which is a small town) I could go to the ranch and they were pretty much just happy to walk along with there mom.I did have one, Abigail that was a great hunter and she would take off after rabbits and not stop.But it is real open here and I would just run and run till I would catch her.I never did get her to stop running after foxes but in time I did the rabbits.The fox would usually double back so I could intercept.But my Sidney was a mamma's girl and would only go so far from me so it would limit how far Abigail would go.I also think maybe when they get use to having you lead them and you are a pack they want to stay with you.For some reason they have never gone very far from us when we're in the Mountains, thank goodness.Maybe there not as sure of there selves but we have never had a problem then.My rescue basset was about 2 or 3 when I got her and she never did run away on our walks so she wasn't on a leash very long.I think the long leash and treats would be a good idea I have used them to get them to come back quicker.But like I said I'm in open country and they can go a ways before we run into people.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,240 Posts
Annie is really good about checking for me when she is off-leash. (knock on wood that it stays this way) She did run home one time we were off-leash at the park near my house. Scared the bee-jeezus out of me even though I could see her the whole time. I think her major attachment to me helps keep her near when she is off-leash but I am super vigilant because you never really know what the heck she is thinking.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
973 Posts
If you don't have an off-leash fenced in dog park near you, you can try to find a school yard that's fenced in as was mentioned above. We had a boxer growing up that we could let off the leash whenever we wanted. If they don't pull on the leash, sometimes they don't even realize the leash is no longer in your hand and stay by you anyway.

My parents take their bullmastiff to the beach with a long 20-30 ft lead. Same concept but she can't run away. Might be something to start with if you're worried.

Here is an example of one; this is 50 feet long: http://www.amazon.com/Best-Long-Dog-Leash-Training/dp/B003EH2XJ2

The only thing to worry about is getting dogs or people caught up between you and the dog, but if it's hanging loose they should just step over it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
166 Posts
If you can find a large park with no leash laws that would be best. Lollypop and I have been walking in Rutland State Park in central MA for over a year and a half, and we walk for miles off leash. For a while (til I found a new job) we were walking maybe 3 to 4 miles a day in the woods and park trails and dirt roads. Lollypop never strays too far and seems to always be aware of where I am. Maybe it's her personality, maybe it's cause she started at such a young age (11 weeks or so). Just make sure there are no major highways or roads in the immediate vicinity. I think dogs (and yes, bassets) should be able to run free from time to time. What a cutie Worm is! Good luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,856 Posts
I had one that we used to call the Houdini dog. When he got loose, if I didn't catch him at the first tree he stopped to pee at, I had to get the car.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
767 Posts
I take my 2 Bassets and a puggle out for walks in the desert almost daily. Have never had a problem with them not being on a leash. The other day they flushed out 15 to 20 Quail and were real proud of themselves. The only time I put them on the leash is when we get home to go into the house. Just in case their not ready to quit walking for the day.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Thanks everyone for your info and advice will give a try with a longer extendable lead have got one but maybe the one on Amazon site would be more suitable to give him a longer run etc. Bert is such a character as I figure all basssetts are - but I suppose the fear is in me that I will lose him if I let him off - will try with food treats because he will do anything for food!!!:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,937 Posts
first lest deal with some of the myth and the turths behind them.

1. bassets are scent hounds and will follow scents especial other prey animal if they have be trained to which is not alot mre than givening them the oppurtunity to. That said they were also bred as realitivly close worker. Any on that has been where basset are hunting or a field trial situation where the are hunt rather than simply tracking a scent laid down will find they work relatively close to humansd. You may not see them but if you move the move with you so the are really not that far away. There primary game for a basset is rqbbit. Rabbits circle some time a gian circle but in the end a circle so again chasing a rabbit they don't end up that far away.

Where the problem comes in is not if but when they chase so called "trash" game or non game animal they are not suppose to like deer or fox which will run in a straight line for miles.

So the danger with a basset off lead is chasing unapproved animals, which can result in them traveling quite some distance and get them and you in trouble with game wardens/evironmental poilice. It is a risk and how big of risk depends on the animals in the area and your particular dogs propensity to track chase them. There are ways to discourage such behavior with the only really effective menthod center on the use of shock collar. Or one knowledge obut the area an the behavior of the dog can manage the situation by preventing most such occurances.

Beingf off leash is something the dog need to earn. You would not want to take out to the oods and let him loose without some reasonal expectation of what he would do and react. You need to start of in controled areas parks etc that are fenced. open areas you can use a long line 50-100ft etc

The dog needs a realy reliable recall under the most distracted situations. the calls for train but not ordinary training it requires train under heavy distractions but you must built up to slow to greater and greater distractions.


Can a basset be safe off leash ? that is a loaded question, nothing is 100% safe including keeping the dog on leash. But in the right situation under the right conditions with reasonable training a basset is capable of not wandering of never to be seen again.

I've don backwood backpacking with them off lead and the nearest road 50 miles away. , field trials in non-contained areas. etc off leash and ther are urban and other setting where to do so would be fool hardy. And there are certain dogs like my harrier that I would never trust off leash, but I have yet to oen a basset that I feel the same way about but it could happen.

DEPOSITS INTO THE PERFECT RECALL ACCOUNT

DISTRACTIONS FOR YOUR RECALL

list of reinforcers

really reliable Recall

Leslie Nelson Really Reliable Recall DVD

Really reliable recall or Fido, PLEASE come home!

Question from Christina P.: What is the most important thing you can teach your dog?
Answer: Great question Christina!
The most important thing you can teach your dog is a reliable recall. It will save his life one day, so please do not scrimp on your training of this life saving behavior. I start teaching a recall by teaching the dog that their name is very valuable.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,780 Posts
Discussion Starter #17 (Edited)
Yes, we appreciate all stories and ideas on this topic-- thanks for your input, everyone!

I actually have an extra long leash that i've never used on walks before, so will definitely give it a try at the park. I like Porter's owner's idea about having a nice visible command that he can recognize from far away (btw, Worm is the same as Porter-- no food, he'll ignore me too! food is like gold when it comes to bassets...) and thanks for the links and the reminder about how important good recall is for these dogs...! i will take a look at them and try to train Worm...^_^ we'll see how it goes!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,937 Posts
no food, he'll ignore me too! food is like gold when it comes to bassets...)

Two thinks come into play here. the first is getting the food etxc before training. That is the getting of treates etc becomes a signal when the dog gets treats for complying. No precursur not treats. You need to change the routine so you do not need to go to a cabinet, fridge, etc to get treats shortly before training. Have the with you long time before hand.

dogs sences of smell is acute they often can tell if you have treats on your person. Try train with food else where but use food and going to the food as part of the reward. Ie calling the dog , when dog comes run to where the treats are kept. you can do this out side as well having the treats in a container a way from you etc. You need to create the illusion even if the dog has no indication treates are present that you can still produce them to reward desired behavior.

This is where clicker training can be valuable , have the reward delay while you get the treat does not reward the desire behavior very strongly it rewards going to get the treat strongly. With a clicker you create a bridge telling the dog exactly what it is being rewarded for and that a treat is on its way.


FOOD-MOTIVATED


{quote]I actually have an extra long leash that i've never used on walks before, so will definitely give it a try at the park[/quote]

personally I am not a fan of retractable leads they tend to create more problems than they solve. Especial the way they are used by most that own them. The use of a long lead for certain training exercise is acceptable but they do not work as a long term management solution either.

THE PROBLEM WITH RETRACTABLE LEASHES
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,740 Posts
The question is: Would letting your dog off lead be worth chancing? For me the answer is "NO"!I refuse to risk their lives so they can have freedom outside of a fenced area.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
251 Posts
The question is: Would letting your dog off lead be worth chancing? For me the answer is "NO"!I refuse to risk their lives so they can have freedom outside of a fenced area

I totally agree!
 
1 - 20 of 26 Posts
Top