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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Fergus has been growing a lot and seems really healthy and normal, but he does this weird thing with one of his front legs and we're not sure if it's som
ething to be concerned about. From what we can tell, he has no pain in this leg. He doesn't limp and he's never had an injury, but he always stands like this and it looks a little freaky.

Any thoughts? I'm of the opinion that it just grew sort of funny and if it's not causing harm, no big deal. This is my first basset, though, and if it's a sign of something I thought you guys would know best. Thanks for any insight.
 

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Ringo's front legs are kind of like that too...kind of knobby. This is the best picture I could find of his



You can kind of see in his right leg. I think that is just how the bone structure is, he has no problems walking/running/steps or anything so I wouldn't worry about it.
 

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Charlie's leg looks just like that! It is just a leg deformity. Our vet said that if it doesn't bother her, we don't need to worry!
 

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This is called "Knuckled Over". It is a deformity of the front legs,usually in dogs that have been poorly bred. Please,do not take offense to that but it is the truth. The parents probably looked much the same. It can cause problems as the puppy grows or it may not untill the dog is much older. It doesn't look very comfortable to me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the feedback. I'll have to do some research on being "knuckled over"- thanks Bubbad (no offense taken). :) Ringo is super cute- Bklantz.
 

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My boy Gibbs has a front leg deformity. (We sometimes wonder if that's why he was at the pound...maybe the owners got scared of the deformity??) It doesn't slow him down 1 bit.

~Heather
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
So I did some research (including finding a thread here after I had posted) after I read all these great responses and it looks like knuckling over can be a nutritional deficiency- not just genetic- and can be corrected with supplements and taping the leg. Because Fergus is still so young, we're going to the vet tomorrow to get some advice on balancing his nutrition and help with the taping of his leg. I will let you know what she thinks.

Apparently this happens when they are young and the growth plate gets messed up (wrong nutrients, growing too fast). It's common among bassets because they are a large-breed dog in a medium-breed dog body. The bone structure is so dense that they really need to be treated like a large-breed dog. This is all news to me, so ignore me if you're aware of this. Knuckling over is a disqualifying trait in the AKC. We have no intention of showing him, but I bring it up because it's apparently so common.

Here is the other thread about this: http://www.basset.net/boards/basset-hound-health-genetics/12433-bad-front-legs-another-issue.html

I will update when we hear what the vet thinks. It's so hard with the vet- she's really great, but I don't feel like they really know much about this breed. I want a special basset vet for my special boy. :D
 

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It is unfortunate but most Vets do not really "know" bassets. Most times a dog is just a dog because they all have the same parts. I do think more are becoming informed because of owners who know their dogs. Thank you for doing all the leg work on the legs ,which explains it well. When bassets are puppies they have what I call the "Jello Factor":p. A vet goes to go over them and they just turn to jello ,the joints are loose ,sometimes jaws have a click,the puppies do not seem "put together" and they kind of aren't because with bassets one day nothing is wrong the next there goes a foot out of whack,a top line goes up(or down),jaws misaline etc. Well bred bassets are less likely to suffer from leg deformities but even then if the nutritional quality is compromised it can happen.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks Bubbad for all of your insight. It's deeply appreciated. We went to see our vet on Saturday and they suspect he has an angular deformity. We didn't get into x-rays, as we decided to go straight to the specialists. We go in tomorrow to find out what is going on and what, if anything, can be done. The vet doesn't seem to think it's nutritional, but, as you suspected, genetic. Best case scenario it can be corrected without surgery. Worst case scenario, the leg will be lame. I am trying to think positive, as it's hard to think about a puppy having a lame leg so early in life. He'll be fine, but it breaks my heart! It's amazing how fast these guys become an indispensable part of our hearts. I will post an update as we know more, just in case anyone else has to go through this.
 

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Bless your heart. It isn't so simple to correct but you are giving it a shot. I would suspect may have arthritites as he gets older,but I'm sure he can be kept comfortable. Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thank you to everyone who has posted here. We are going in for leg reconstruction surgery on Monday. The leg is about 70 degrees turned to the side. Our specialist has owned 5 bassets and rescued many more. He thinks Fergus will respond well to the surgery and heal quickly being so young. This guy is a keeper- he calls bassets "God's Breed" and knows his way around their knobby little bodies.

Keep us in your thoughts and I will let everyone know how it goes.
 

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How wonderful that you have a specialist that understands bassets! "God's Breed", I couldn't agree more.

I hope his surgery goes well on Monday; Boomer and I will be thinking of you both.
 
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