Basset Hounds Forum banner

1 - 2 of 2 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
48 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I haven't visited the forum in a long time and didn't know how much I missed reading all the posts until I re-visited! I want to seek words of wisdom from owners of more than one basset. Nugget has been an "only child" since we got her. Well, we also have a cat who is well established as the head of the household. Nugget is the object of affection for both our family and extended family members who live next door but spend lots of time over here. My niece just got a baby basset (9 weeks old) this weekend and we had a very successful introduction to Nugget over the weekend. Nugget will be 2 years old in May, by the way. At first Nugget was afraid of the puppy...we were anticipating jealousy, not fear! But after a short period of time and lots of sniffing, they began to play. Now bear in mind, Daisy Belle is here for a few hours at a time, not 24/7. By the end of the weekend they seemed to be thoroughly enjoying each other and were cute as can be together. I can't wait for her to visit this evening!

My concern is when/how do we know when it would be OK to leave them together without us grown-ups? We have this notion that we'd like for Daisy to eventually come over and be with Nugget while we're all at work. Nugget isn't aggressive at all...spoiled,yes!...but I feel like Daisy needs to be bigger before they could be left alone together. Also, someone told me that sometimes when a girl basset gets around 2 years old, she can become very territorial and might not be too pleased to have another girl around.

Sorry to have written a novel but wanted to try to explain our situation well enough to receive good advice!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,947 Posts
Saskatchewan
I feel like Daisy needs to be bigger before they could be left alone together. Also, someone told me that sometimes when a girl basset gets around 2 years old, she can become very territorial and might not be too pleased to have another girl around.

Sorry to have written a novel but wanted to try to explain our situation well enough to receive good advice![/b]

Same sex sibbling rivalry appeares to be heavily tide to "mating rights". THat means it is not a very significant occurrance in spayed/and nuetered dogs. FWIW my two girls are best buddies and would much rather play with each other than the other dogs. Granted none of others are bassets so that has something to do with it also, compatable play styles et. al.


Actual you are much more likely to have problems between nugget and daisy when daisy gets a bit older this is normal part of dog society.

Social Hierarchies
However, in the early affirmative action tests with two-month-old puppies starting in possession of the bone, adult females never expropriated the bone and adult males only did so in 40% of the tests. By the time the 'pups' were six months old, however, adult females expropriated the bone in 60% of tests and adult males always took it away. It was apparent that adult dogs, bitches especially, showed leniency towards young pups in social situations. The termination of this 'puppy license' is cued by rising testosterone levels in male pups at four- to five-months of age, which reach a peak around 10 months (4-5 ng/ml) before declining to adult levels (1-2 ng/ml). When puppies approached adolescence, they were continually harassed by adult dogs. Male adolescents were especially targeted by adult males. This stressful phase of social development is mercifully short, because the pups quickly learn to display active and exaggerated appeasement in order to allay harassment by adults, i.e., the pups learn their station in life before they become serious competition on the social scene.[/b]
Macho Myth
Most adult dogs are quite lenient with young pups until they approach adolescence, whereupon adults (males especially) relentlessly pursue, stand-over and growl at the adolescents (males especially). Even so, harassment by adult dogs is largely psychological, rather than physical. It would be a perversely under-socialized adult dog, which physically beats up young puppies.

Nonetheless, during this crucial stage in hierarchical development, young pup and adolescents are extremely intimidated by the incessant harassment and consequently, they learn to respond with exaggerated appeasement gestures to assuage the torment from their elders. Moreover, puppies and adolescents quickly learn that bother from older dogs may be largely prevented by taking the initiative and demonstrating active appeasement before they are harassed. The pups' preemptive apology characteristically comprises: a low slung, wiggly approach with ears back, submissive grin and tail and hindquarters all a wag. The youngster may paw the brisket and lick the muzzle of the older dog. (The infantile pawing and muzzle-licking food-soliciting behaviors of puppyhood now acquire new meaning and are retained as neotenic appeasement gestures in adolescence and adulthood.) In addition, the underdog may rollover and lift a leg to expose its inguinal region. And some may submissively urinate. (Adult dogs may determine the age of a puppy or adolescent from the smell of the youngster's urine.)[/b]

Keep in mind an adult being a bit snip and growly with a youngster may be entirely appropriate and to some extent necessary to have a properly socialized dog when it grows up.
He Just Wants to Say Hi!
"Aggression or appropriate response to rudeness? Far too many dogs suffer because handlers & trainers don't know the difference between the two. "
 
1 - 2 of 2 Posts
Top