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My 3 yr old male Bubbie is not being very nice to Bella, she's 8 months. This has sorta been going on since we got her, about 4 mnths ago. At first I thought he was just showing her who 's boss but it seems to be getting worse. They play alot but other than that he wants nothing to do with her. If she walks by him he growls. For instance last night he was asleep and she asleep by him. Well when she went to get up he snapped and bit her in the face. This is not the first time either. He doesn't break skin or anything but I am sure it hurts her or either really scares her. They drink/eat out of the same bowls sometimes and there is no problem there. I don't know what to do. Anyone else had problems with this?
 

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My 3 yr old male Bubbie is not being very nice to Bella, she's 8 months. This has sorta been going on since we got her, about 4 mnths ago. At first I thought he was just showing her who 's boss but it seems to be getting worse. They play alot but other than that he wants nothing to do with her. If she walks by him he growls. For instance last night he was asleep and she asleep by him. Well when she went to get up he snapped and bit her in the face. This is not the first time either. He doesn't break skin or anything but I am sure it hurts her or either really scares her. They drink/eat out of the same bowls sometimes and there is no problem there. I don't know what to do. Anyone else had problems with this?[/b]
Know the expression "let sleeping dogs be"? We had the same problem with our Hana (5 at the time) when we got Cassie who was 8 months. Cassie was young and sometimes obnoxious and Hana couldn't always deal with it. Cassie was giving Hana a run for her money. Our other dog, Abby, who was 3 at the time, just ignored Hana altogether and there were never any issues. Cassie stood up to Hana all the time...and has some war wounds to show for it. It was particularly bad when Hana was asleep and was awoken suddenly and we really had to be careful to try and give Hana a space where she could sleep undisturbed. Our vet said the two dogs would never get on.

Well two years down the line they actually do get on. They play together often. When we go for walks Hana and Cassie always walk together, smell the same things and pee in the same places. Hana is still grumpy sometimes, although I can't always blame her. Yesterday morning, after two weeks of sleeping in, it was back to early mornings. The dogs were still asleep except for Cassie who started whining when my wife went in to take a shower. Hana got fed up with the early morning noise, gave a loud quick bark at Cassie and sent her scurrying for cover!! Nothing more than that, but Cassie got the message.

We would tell Hana off when she went after Cassie, although we were told that the dogs should sort it out themselves. If we had gone that route, I think we would have had to rehome Hana. Both dogs were rescues, but Hana was already three when we got her and she was a really insecure dog. But with a lot of persistence we got them both to tolerate each other and maybe more. Nowadays Hana is a lot more secure and sleeps easier. If someone knocks her bed when she is sleeping more often than not she wags her tail and looks at you out of one eye rather than freaking out.

It could be that we were just really lucky. In which case, I wish you as much luck as we had!
 

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well, i'm no pro at dog training and behaviour issues, but my husband and I have been watching the Dog Whisperer and have taken a few things from it and they've worked for our puppy so far. He does deal a lot with behavioural issues towards other people and other dogs. He's on the National Geographic Channel every day.

http://channel.nationalgeographic.com/channel/dogwhisperer/

or you can go directly to his website that has several tips and advice

http://www.cesarmillaninc.com/

that's about all the advice I can give. Good luck, i hope things get better for your pups and you!!
 

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. If she walks by him he growls. For instance last night he was asleep and she asleep by him. Well when she went to get up he snapped and bit her in the face. This is not the first time either. He doesn't break skin or anything but I am sure it hurts her or either really scares her.[/b]

Rest assured if he wanted to hurt her it would have happend, The bite on the snout is a classic dog disipline thing. ASre you sure which dog is to blame there are times when rude behavior by a puppy are deservinge of disipline,


some reading that may help

The Macho Myth
Most adult dogs are quite lenient with young pups until they approach adolescence, whereupon adults (males especially) relentlessly pursue, stand-over and growl at the adolescents (males especially). Even so, harassment by adult dogs is largely psychological, rather than physical. It would be a perversely under-socialized adult dog, which physically beats up young puppies.

Nonetheless, during this crucial stage in hierarchical development, young pup and adolescents are extremely intimidated by the incessant harassment and consequently, they learn to respond with exaggerated appeasement gestures to assuage the torment from their elders. Moreover, puppies and adolescents quickly learn that bother from older dogs may be largely prevented by taking the initiative and demonstrating active appeasement before they are harassed. The pups' preemptive apology characteristically comprises: a low slung, wiggly approach with ears back, submissive grin and tail and hindquarters all a wag. The youngster may paw the brisket and lick the muzzle of the older dog. (The infantile pawing and muzzle-licking food-soliciting behaviors of puppyhood now acquire new meaning and are retained as neotenic appeasement gestures in adolescence and adulthood.) In addition, the underdog may rollover and lift a leg to expose its inguinal region. And some may submissively urinate. (Adult dogs may determine the age of a puppy or adolescent from the smell of the youngster's urine.)[/b]
HE JUST WANTS TO SAY "HI!
"Aggression or appropriate response to rudeness? Far too many dogs suffer because handlers & trainers don't know the difference between the two."

Why Not Take Candy from a Baby (If He Lets You?) Examines manipulation as part of social life, and the dog's need for clear boundaries & leadership.



If you are still concerened by bubbie's behavior then your vet should be able to recommend a behaviorist. This would be a better choice than trying to learn something from someone who plays a behaviorist on TV
 

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Once in a while Sadie our female Basset will be like that with our Male Basset Maxwell and our female Miniature Pincher Lita. Most the time they all get along fine, they play together, eat and drink out of the same bowl eat treats together and no problems. But some times out of no where for no reason what so ever Sadie will get in a mood and act very aggressive towards the other dogs. We usually can tell when it's coming on. She will fist start to growl softly and she will increasingly get louder and more vicious sounding. It really scares the other dogs; they will hide behind the furniture. We usually can tell it's coming on and grab her collar and hold her until she calms back down, sometimes she just keeps it up until we have to put her in the kennel for a while. She has never really hurt the other dogs; if we don't grab her collar in time she will go after them but has never broke skin or hurt them. Mostly just scares them. She doesn't do it as much as she used to but every now and then she will.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Rest assured if he wanted to hurt her it would have happend, The bite on the snout is a classic dog disipline thing. ASre you sure which dog is to blame there are times when rude behavior by a puppy are deservinge of disipline,
some reading that may help

The Macho Myth
HE JUST WANTS TO SAY "HI!
"Aggression or appropriate response to rudeness? Far too many dogs suffer because handlers & trainers don't know the difference between the two."

Why Not Take Candy from a Baby (If He Lets You?) Examines manipulation as part of social life, and the dog's need for clear boundaries & leadership.
If you are still concerened by bubbie's behavior then your vet should be able to recommend a behaviorist. This would be a better choice than trying to learn something from someone who plays a behaviorist on TV[/b]
Thank you for the Macho Myth article. Bella does those exact things when Bubbie growls and snaps at her. She will usually yelp and then roll on her back and paw and lick at him. Alot of times he will then lay his head on her. I don't know anything about animal behavior but I am sure you are right in that if he wanted to hurt her he would. It does seem that it has gotten worse as she as gotten older.
 
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