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Discussion Starter #1
I've got the dog of my long time dreams, an 11 week old Lemon Basset puppy. Her name is Dixie. I was wondering if Bassets have any genetic problems that I need to be aware of and watch out for, like hip dysplasia, back problems, skin problems or any thing else? When ever we get a new dog, it's always a purebreed and I know pure breeds tend to have more problems than mix breeds. I'm hoping and praying that Dixie comes from a good blood line. She's a wonderful addition to the family of 3 ferrets(one of which she has made fast wrestling buddies with and the other two avoid her like the plaque. LoL) and a 7 year old Blue Heeler, two children and a husband.
Another quick question. We plan on spaying her as soon as she's old enough. I know this will make her less likely to roam (not to mention have the obvious....puppies), but will it make her less likely to want to go off and hunt away from the house as well? Being a hound, she's a natural hunter and I would think this instinct would be difficult to calm.
I'll see if I can figure out how to post a picture of her. :cool: Dixie Homepage
 

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Here's Dixie!


Well, spaying will prevent puppies but bassets are notorious trackers. They get a scent and will follow it till they have found what they're looking for or something else interesting grabs their nose. It is a rare basset that can go off lead and be trusted to stay put.

Go to www.dailydrool.com. There is a list of some of the more common ailments found in basets on the left hand side of the page.

Hope you don't mind me posting her picture for you. She's really cute!

[ February 02, 2005, 10:29 PM: Message edited by: Houndkeeper ]
 

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Bassets can have trouble with the problems you mentioned. In addition, glaucoma is a big problem, and there are a couple of bleeding disorders that can affect them.
 

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One other thing and you probably already picked this tidbit up perusing the forum. Bassets can get very, very fat if you let them. Feed high quality food, limit the goodies, and plenty of excersize. They aren't as lazy as non-droolers think tthey are. They just don't believe in wasted motion. All 3 of mine have enjoy going for a walk and they have a large, fenced yard. All long backed dogs are more prone to back issues if they carry too much weight.
 

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orthopeadically Pano is the number one problem. It affect males much more so than females but is largely self regulating, cures it self over time.

Any time a puppy starts limping 5-18 months suspect pano first!. Bassets do have a tendency toward bad hips however litte body wieght is carried on the rear and the short limbs also but less stress on the hips. Hips that would cripple larger dogs like labs many bassets continue on life without a problem. Elbow dysplasia and other elbow problems are a different matter, Since a basset carries up to 75% of its wieght on the front assembly, problems here are magnified.

[ February 03, 2005, 12:39 PM: Message edited by: Toughynutter ]
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thank you everyone, for some great responses. I'm glad I found this hound (hey, that rhymed,lol) sight. It's such a sound place to be around. I know I'll have a mound of fun, especially reading the resue stories from the pound. See ya'll 'round.
Sorry....a silly attempt to rhyme with the word, "hound". lol

Thanks again.
 

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Every time I placed a puppy I would tell the new owners, you can't cut off the part that causes most of the problems, their nose! Do not for a second think she will be any less eager to roam.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Originally posted by Houndkeeper:
Go to www.dailydrool.com.  There is a list of some of the more common ailments found in basets on the left hand side of the page.

Hope you don't mind me posting her picture for you.  She's really cute! [/QB]
Thank you. I'm checking the site out as soon as I leave here. And...No...not at all. I didn't mind you posting the picture of Dixie. Once I get the hang of how this site works, I'll take somemore pic's and post them. Thank you again.
 

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Awwwww, Dixie is absolutely PRECIOUS!!! Our basset turned one year this past November. We just love her. She is spoiled ROTTEN!!! I have 4 kids and 2 neices in my house all the time so she gets plenty of love. Plus, she has a doggie bed but ends up in between me and my husbands feet at the end of our bed every night. It's actually nice on these cold winter nights. But around 5:30am she wants to give us kisses and go out to pee!
 
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When Dixie reaches the age of 3 start having the vet check periodically for eye pressure. Glaucoma is seen in about 5 percent of all bassets and if increased pressure is detected early you can start eye drops to keep the disease at bay.
I have a 6 year old named Francis who has glaucoma and it's been a little work to keep his pressures checked. He lost his right eye to the disease and we are super vigilant about his left eye. I don't mean to scare you (not at all, you're going to have a blast with your new buddy) but a little vigilance can be a good thing.
She's adorable, by the way. Good Luck and have fun
 

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You don't really have to worry about a female roaming...a male dog can smell a bitch in heat up to a mile away and that's where you get the roaming problems. As far as puppies go, a responsible dog owner doesn't have much to worry about in the way of accidental pregnancies. Do some reading up on spaying to get the proper age...many vets do it too early.
 

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many vets do it too early.
Don't Know of any vet that would spay before 7-8 weeks. It is safe and actual easier and faster healing for the dog. Many vets are either uncomfortable with the procedure or are not equipt to do the procedure but in no way does that mean spay/nueter should not be performed at an early age.

Changing Views on Early Spaying and Neutering
. In 1991, after careful evaluation of scientific data, the American Humane Association became the first national organization to endorse early spaying and neutering of puppies and kittens. The American Veterinary Medical Association and the American Animal Hospital Association quickly followed suit and believe the practice to be a safe, effective tool to help end pet overpopulation.

With the advancement of medical knowledge over the past 10 years, informed veterinarians have changed their views on the appropriate age for pet spaying and neutering. Doctors at large and prestigious veterinary hospitals and humane shelters such as Boston's Angell Memorial Animal Hospital, and the Los Angeles SPCA, the Miami Humane Society, and the Harrison Memorial Animal Hospital of Denver have performed thousands of early spay/neuter surgeries with excellent results.
...Minimal fat and bleeding make the surgery easier and faster in the juvenile patient, and quicker healing shortens recovery period

... Extensive studies and research by Dr. Mark Bloomberg, DVM, DACVS and Chief of Staff at the University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine show that there are no difference in immune function, growth rates and final size, and urinary tract function and disease rates in juvenile versus adult spay/neuter cases.
Early Spay/Neuter Research
 

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Tooughy is right. When we had our first dachshund, in 1989, the vet recommended we wait until 1 year old, or after her second heat, to spay her. THese days, they recommend doing it before the first heat (i.e. at about five months).
 

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Glaucoma is predominant in bassett hounds. My bassett had her right eye removed due to chronic glaucoma and is being treated with medication in the left eye for pre-disposed glaucoma. Bassetts also can have ear problems. As far as spaying your dog, I was told that if you spay your female dog before 6 months of age, your dog will never get breast cancer.
 
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