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Discussion Starter #1
I found this article and was wondering if anyone has any more info - pro or con - on it. I hate to keep giving my dogs vaccines that they probably don't need.

VACCINATION NEWSFLASH [CIMDA support] Re: J Dodd's vaccine protocol
I would like to make you aware that all 27 veterinary schools in North America are in the process of changing their protocols for vaccinating dogs and cats.

Some of this information will present an ethical & economic challenge to vets, and there will be skeptics. Some organizations have come up with a political compromise suggesting vaccinations every 3 years to appease those who fear loss of income vs. those concerned about potential side effects.

Politics, traditions, or the doctor's economic well-being should not be a factor in medical decision.

NEW PRINCIPLES OF IMMUNOLOGY:
Dogs and cats immune systems mature fully at 6 months. If a modified live virus vaccine is given after 6 months of age, it produces immunity, which is good for the life of the pet (ie: canine distemper, parvo, feline distemper). If another MLV vaccine is given a year later, the antibodies from the first vaccine neutralize the antigens of the second vaccine and there is little or no effect. The titer is not "boosted" nor are more memory cells induced.

Not only are annual boosters for parvo and distemper unnecessary, they subject the pet to potential risks of allergic reactions and immune-mediated haemolytic anaemia. There is no scientific documentation to back up label claims for annual administration of MLV vaccines.

Puppies receive antibodies through their mothers milk. This natural protection can last 8-14 weeks. Puppies & kittens should NOT be Vaccinated at LESS than 8 weeks. Maternal immunity will neutralize the vaccine and little protection (0-38%) will be produced.

Vaccination at 6 weeks will, however, DELAY the timing of the first highly effective vaccine.

Vaccinations given 2 weeks apart SUPPRESS rather than stimulate the immune system.

A series of vaccinations is given starting at 8 weeks and given 3-4 weeks apart up to 16 weeks of age.

Another vaccination given sometime after 6 months of age (usually at 1 year 4 mo) will provide lifetime immunity.
 

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I found this article and was wondering if anyone has any more info - pro or con - on it. I hate to keep giving my dogs vaccines that they probably don't need.

VACCINATION NEWSFLASH [CIMDA support] Re: J Dodd's vaccine protocol
I would like to make you aware that all 27 veterinary schools in North America are in the process of changing their protocols for vaccinating dogs and cats.

Some of this information will present an ethical & economic challenge to vets, and there will be skeptics. Some organizations have come up with a political compromise suggesting vaccinations every 3 years to appease those who fear loss of income vs. those concerned about potential side effects.

Politics, traditions, or the doctor's economic well-being should not be a factor in medical decision.

NEW PRINCIPLES OF IMMUNOLOGY:
Dogs and cats immune systems mature fully at 6 months. If a modified live virus vaccine is given after 6 months of age, it produces immunity, which is good for the life of the pet (ie: canine distemper, parvo, feline distemper). If another MLV vaccine is given a year later, the antibodies from the first vaccine neutralize the antigens of the second vaccine and there is little or no effect. The titer is not "boosted" nor are more memory cells induced.

Not only are annual boosters for parvo and distemper unnecessary, they subject the pet to potential risks of allergic reactions and immune-mediated haemolytic anaemia. There is no scientific documentation to back up label claims for annual administration of MLV vaccines.

Puppies receive antibodies through their mothers milk. This natural protection can last 8-14 weeks. Puppies & kittens should NOT be Vaccinated at LESS than 8 weeks. Maternal immunity will neutralize the vaccine and little protection (0-38%) will be produced.

Vaccination at 6 weeks will, however, DELAY the timing of the first highly effective vaccine.

Vaccinations given 2 weeks apart SUPPRESS rather than stimulate the immune system.

A series of vaccinations is given starting at 8 weeks and given 3-4 weeks apart up to 16 weeks of age.

Another vaccination given sometime after 6 months of age (usually at 1 year 4 mo) will provide lifetime immunity.[/b]
Here is a link with all of her recommendations.
http://www.weim.net/emberweims/Vaccine.html
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the link!

Lots to consider and more research to do.
 

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Thanks for the link!

Lots to consider and more research to do.[/b]
Just as one caveate titres are generally more expensive than the vaccine itself and most titres have not been calabrated against immunity so their result are still a bit of a crap shoot. Also there are a number of non-core vaccines that could be benifitial in areas with high outbreak treashold like lyme and leptosprosis. Also keep in mind a number of these are against bacteria . The vanccines for bacteria do not have near the duration as those for viruses there is evidence to sugest that the actual duration of both the lyme and lepto vaccines is less than 1 year.

The vets schools have gone to a three year protocol on core vaccines and differ deppending on geographical region on non-core vaccines.

UC_Davis vaccine protocal

2006 AAHA Canine Vaccine Guidelines

<a href="http://www.calmanimalcare.com/vaccine.htm" target="_blank">Colorado State University's
Small Animal Vaccination Protocol</a>

Ohio State University VTH Canine and Feline Vaccination Guidelines
 

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Discussion Starter #5
My vets are following the 3 year protocol, which is good, but there still seems to be increasing evidence that even every 3 years is too much and possibly unnecessary. Sometimes I think this is "the curse" of the internet - so much available info, but lots of time necessary to filter out the good from the bad.
 

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Spencer was due for his vaccines in June. I went in armed with info about dogs being vaccinated too much. To my surprise, before I could even say anything, the vet told me they were now on the 3 year schedule. So, Spencer only got 1 vaccine this time - rabies, which he was due for. Because of his age (13 yrs) & the fact he rarely comes in contact with other dogs, I was concerned about him getting all the vaccines. His risk for disease seems low (it's not too dangerous on the couch). ;)
 

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The email at the top of this thread is a hoax that gets circulated every so often. Most vets seem to be adopting AHAA's core vaccine/3 year recommendations, and modifying vaccine schedules for individual risk factors.

While the every-3-year experiment is underway, I continue to vaccinate my show/performance dogs annually, because we know annual vaccines are effective. My retired dogs get shots every 3 years. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for the info, Betsy. It's best not to trust most things on the 'net unless you know & trust the source.

We're on the 3 year protocol and I guess that's where we'll stay for the time being.
 
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