Basset Hounds Forum banner
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, I'm new to the forum and wanted to introduce myself and Clovis, my 5 year old tri-colored basset hound. He is a big boy, 85 lbs. which is all muscle. Clovis is my 5th basset so I guess that says something about my personality as well. He has been a great addition to our family and loves my 10 lb mini dachshund who is 13 yo. Clovis doesn't have an ounce of aggression and I've been urged to have him be a therapy dog, but those of us who have had Bassets know there is the issue of that stubborn streak they all seem possess. I'm not sure how far we'd get with the training.

I do have a question though. Sadly, Clovis has a mass on the tip of his tail which the vet is concerned about. He tried to get some fluid from it but couldn't get too much, but what he could see under a microscope reflected some oddly shaped cells and he wants to remove and biopsy it ASAP. Clovis is a low-rider and definitely can't manage an e-collar. I'm wondering about the padded collars that are on the market. I'm not even sure he can reach his tail, but I know they will at least try to put a cone of shame on him. Any thoughts anyone has would be appreciated. I'm praying this is a nuisance tumor and not malignant as we've already discussed tail amputation. Nice to be a part of this group, Sallie
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,692 Posts
Hi - welcome to the forum which has been rather quiet of late, to the point I found I had to log in to answer this question!

Re those e-collars. We have NEVER been able to keep these on and have a happy hound. In fact they come off before getting into the car! So if you end up needing surgery with youir lad, I'd suggest a soft roll collar might be better. With a low to the ground breed like the Basset, who needs a large e-collar to fit their necks, it tends to act as a scoop - and scares them to death! If you are going to be there whilst his wound heals, you may, overnight apart, manage to keep him off the wound without any collar. I was only in trouble with one of mine who had an ulcerated cornea and ended ujp needing to have the third eyelid stitched across to make a 'bandage'. I thought he'd be ok, but he managed to paw the stitches ouit overnight. Thankfully the ulcer had pretty much healed by the time this happened.

Do you think that even if the tumour is a 'nasty' the entire tail would need to come off? I suppose that's up to his treating vet as he does need to remove the mass leaving wide enough margins. Just be aware, occasionally we'd have one of ours who was prone to these fatty growths and apart from one they were just that. Not malignant. . We'd have them taken off if they started growing significantly or were in a difficult place otherwise we left alone . We did have one with a growth in his neck which, after biopsy, turned out to be lymphoma.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,095 Posts
The biggest problem I have with the plastic cones is they are painful and dangerous battering rams to be used against humans as frequently as possible in the eyes of most bassets. The inflatable collar work well for stopping the dog from getting to rear legs tail etc. Depending were the injury is and size of the collar may not work on front legs and or belly. they definitely do not work to protect the head for being scratched with a foot.
KONG Cloud Collar for Dogs & Cats, X-Small - Chewy.com

With the beagle mentioned below I with a longish tail for a beagle and a much shorter body wth a proper sized plastic E color see would wrap her tail close to body and snap her head down the the plastic cone trapping her tail so she could chew on it . I had to as about six in length to the plastc cone with duct tap and cardboard. but then it projected so far out in front of her she would fall over on her face when trying to walk the first couple of days. I doubt an inflatable or any other neck roll would have worked with her,
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,095 Posts
Do you think that even if the tumor is a 'nasty' the entire tail would need to come off?"
The problem is two fold 1. Having enough tissue to get clean margins then having the tail heal properly. I had a beagle that cut the tip of its tail off. not sure how blood showing up on walls out of know where till we figured it out from wagging tail and cut artery . of to the vet surgery which got her right in. Actually cut to the tail bone itself. Took a tiny bit of the bone well. The had to take more bone so there was enough skin to cover and hoped it heeled. Surgeon noted it is not uncommon to require multiple surgeries because of poor blood flow the shin on the tip dies and no longer cover the bone etc.

https://vetruus.com/dog-ends-a-new-treatment-for-tail-tip-injuries/
"
Without careful management, tail tip injuries are unlikely to heal and rapidly turn into chronic haemorrhaging wounds, causing pain and suffering for the dog and great difficulties for owners or dog handlers. Blood is sprayed up the walls when the tail is wagged and the wound will literally not heal."

Just be aware, occasionally we'd have one of ours who was prone to these fatty growths and apart from one they were just that. Not malignant. .
Just had a large cyst remove for one of our three year old at the base of his tail that looked like it was getting ready to explode when he was having cherry eye surgery as well. Turned out there was a second smaller cyst right next to it but they could not remove that one and have enough skin left to close the wound back up. This is a problem with tumors on the tail. especially the closer to the tip you go there is less extra skin to close any wound that you actual remove skin. So you are stuck with amputating / or partial amputating the tail .
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top