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Discussion Starter #1
Hi everyone, new member here.

We brought home our first basset the other night and I'm determined to learn as much as I can so I can train her properly and keep her well balanced and happy.

I've never had a hound before, our family has mostly been Pugs, Chihuahuas and other smaller short faced dogs . While I was aware that hounds will be prone to howl, I do want to get a handle on this before it becomes a bad habit for her.

She's only 12 weeks old, and she howls and cries anytime we put her in her crate. She was born on a farm, so I assume that previous to moving here she had full run of wherever she wanted to go (or at least more so than an apartment).

I've read that a good way to deter them from barking is to just ignore them, but that's not really an option because our neighbors are not the kindest of people.

Have any methods worked for any of you in the past? We spoke with someone at Petsmart today who suggested pennies in a metal can, but that did absolutely nothing.

Any suggestions?

(PS: I might have several more threads with questions :D LOL)
 

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you are expecting to much simply putting a dog in a crate and not expect them to protest. "crate training" is actual the term use to aclimate a dog to a crate. Using a crate during house breaking is simply that.

see the links below

Crate Training

crate Training



Crate Games for Self-Control & Motivation DVD

Crate Games for Self-Control and Motivation features not only mature dogs but puppies as young as 9 weeks old learning
Seperation Anxiety
Dogs are highly social animals. Their genetic programming is to be in a pack with other individuals 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. They can learn to handle being alone for moderate periods of time but, in most cases, it doesn’t come naturally. It’s not surprising then that some dogs develop separation anxiety, a disorder which, in its severe form, can consist of panic attacks: urinating, defecating, frantically scratching and chewing at doorframes, barking and crying whenever the dog is left alone.​
Separation anxiety is often triggered by either a high contrast situation – months of the owner home all day followed by sudden eight-hour absences – or some sort of life change – rehoming, a stay at a boarding kennel, a death of a key family member or major change in routine.

...

Puppies and newly adopted dogs are at higher risk to develop separation anxiety if they are smothered with constant attention their first few days home. It is much better to leave for brief periods extremely often so the dog’s early learning about departures is that they are no big deal and predict easy, tolerable lengths of absence: "whenever she leaves, she comes back

Another reasons puppies cry bark an howl is the same reason babies do to get your attention. The much offered advice of simply ignoring the behavior rarely works because it does nothing to affect the underlying need of the puppy. Secondly ignoring a previously rewarded behavior, cause the behavior to get worse much worse through a phenonenom know as an "extinction burst" if the dog performs these behavior in this context it is because they have been rewarded for it, keep in mind interaction with the dog that we humans consider punishment is none the less attention the dog is seeking so punishment is often actually rewarding the behavior. an lastly it does not teach the dog a better alternative behavior. Because the underlying emotional state of the dog has not changed it desire for attention has not changed, If on method of seeking attention is effectively ectingquished the dog does not simply abondandon the desire to get it. It comes up with even more annoying behavior you simply can not ignore.

see Harmony Programme for a better way
when first asked for it[/B]; the classic “a stitch in time saves nine” principle.

Rather than “rewarding” attention seeking behaviour, it never gets to escalate, the creature’s energy system remains balanced and the disturbed behaviours never need take place at all.

As the babies who are fed when they are hungry cry markedly less or not at all, creatures who receive attention energy (or love or recognition energy) when they ask for it, their attention seeking behaviours become markedly less frequent, markedly less dramatic and may cease altogether once the system has been in operation for a while and the creature has understood that not only can it get what it needs just the for the asking, but also it’s energy system has become more robust, more healthy, more resilient and won’t collapse when there is a time when attention is in short supply.[/quote]
 

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Mikey is dead on with the crate training info. Just know that will take some time for the puppy to adjust. Make sure that you're not reinforcing the behavior by giving her attention while she's making such a fuss. If you do, she'll learn that she can get her way from behaving like that. You might try cover the crate with a sheet or blanket so that she isn't able to see out all the time.

With crate training, you need to teach your puppy to like their crate. Start simply by leaving the crate open for her to get in and out of. When my hound was little, I would hide treats for him to find in his crate. I also gave him something to keep him occupied if he was going to be in the crate for a while. They make a puppy kong with a squeezy cheese like substance you can spray inside. I had a couple of these I would fill then freeze so it would keep him interested for a longer period of time. Here is a link to the stuff I used

Puppy KONG Dog Toys for Beginning Chewers - Toys - Dog - PetSmart
KONG Puppy Stuff'n Paste - Sale - Dog - PetSmart

I also bought a dog shaped toy in roughly the same size as him. I slept with it for several nights so it smelled like me. Here you can kill to birds with one stone, reminding her of her litter mates and having the smell of you around to easy anxiety. You can also so the same thing with an old t shirt that you wouldn't mind being chewed up.

Hang in there! It takes some time for the little ones to settle in but in the end it's totally worth it!
 

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Perhaps puppy needs some love and attention and time to settle in as being somewhere different needs time to get used to! She is probably missing the rest of her family that she's been spending fun times with for several weeks and needs to be cuddled, played with and not ignored in a crate!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Just in case anyone got the wrong idea, we don't just leave her in the crate all the time. Our dogs are only ever in their crates if it's time for bed, or if we leave the house. We've done this with all of our dogs growing up and our 7 year old pug sleeps in a crate too.

When she's not in her crate, she's playing with us, going on walks, or of course napping (as she's only 12 weeks old). I just wanted to know if anyone knew of any ways to nip this habit in the bud early on.

Right now she's asleep on the couch. My husband and I take turns sleeping in the living room because she won't go in her crate for the night at all, but she can't be trusted to just roam free at night.

Tonight I tried hiding treats in there, and I gave her a piece of a treat anytime she checked the crate out or went inside. When she went inside I closed the door and gave her a treat as well, and then I opened the door and if she stayed inside, I gave her another one. But if I closed the door and just kind of left her there for any longer than a minute, she would cry.

I'll be trying to continue this tomorrow during the day (when my neighbors are gone or at least awake so if she does cry I can try to not give her attention for it).
 

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Feeling your pain, Jia! We've just been through it with our puppy-- we got him at 16 weeks and have had him for almost 3 months now. I would say it was a month-long process for him, to get really comfortable and crate-trained.

For starters, I have a feeling that all dogs are different, so just because I had a pretty easy time doesn't mean it's because I did all the right things-- a lot of it has to do with the dog, too, so please don't get discouraged and keep trying to figure out what will work for your puppy. For example, my puppy has never, ever howled-- now, who knows why? maybe it will come later in life for him. However, he can bark very, very loud, starting from Day 1 when he was barking in the car as I took him home. A very mature LOUD bark. However, there have only been 2x when he has used this loud bark. Once when he had to stay at the vet's (obnoxiously loud) and once when my roommate was home but had him in the crate-- he apparently barked x 45 minutes (as my upstairs neighbor told me). But other than that, he has never used that bark (thankfully) when he's in the crate. He would just whine to show us he was upset. Usually he would whine anywhere from a few minutes to 10 minutes each time we put him in the crate that first month; then he would curl up into a ball and give us a sad-mad look, and then fall asleep.

I should also tell you about my friend, who crate trained her chihuahua and told me to crate-train mine. Her chihuahua barked and barked and made all sorts of noise for 3 days straight; then decided it wasn't worth it to bark anymore, and never made a sound again when put in her crate. Crate-trained in 3 days, despite all the obnoxious barking! And actually loves going into her crate now, and even goes in by herself at times. So, it can happen.

I had to read all about crate training, because I didn't know a thing about it. One thing I read that could be helpful in your situation, is that it made the suggestion to alert your neighbors that you just got a puppy and are in the midst of crate-training it now. Meaning that it could be a very loud and annoying process, but only this bad for a short time. You could explain the process usually takes weeks to months (or for my friend, only days!), and that once it is done, the puppy should not typically be that loud anymore, and that many puppies are quiet once they are crate-trained (mine is totally silent). Anyways, it could be helpful to open that line of communication with them, if you have a decent relationship with them, maybe even giving them a gift card or small present as a token of your appreciation for their patience (if you feel inclined to do so). Bottom line is that it could be helpful to explain that this really shouldn't be a long-term situation, just a temporary one.

Other things we did, which you may or may not find helpful: we didn't just have him in the crate when we were gone or sleeping (first month, he slept in his crate in the living room). We also would put him in there for a half hour or an hour, several times a day, on weekends, for example. And we would be in the same room with him doing other things around him. That seemed to help him not always associate the crate with us leaving him. We put a lot of comfy blankets and water bottle in his crate. We also have always put toys in his crate-- however, I have never seen him actually play with toys in the crate. He only seems to rest or sleep in the crate. I also used to feed him his dinner in his crate, occasionally, since he looovvves food! I would put his bowl in it with the door open. He was so excited about the food, he would go in and eat it, and then come out when he was done. Just so he can associate the crate with good things. Couple times a week, I would also give him a beef rib bone or other chew/bone toy that he could work on and eat over a period of 30 minutes or so. I would put it in there, he would go in, I would shut the door, and he would be preoccupied with working on it (so definitely no barking or whining for a half hour!). Also, it was cleaner for him to eat the bone in the crate, rather than on our carpet. We did ignore him when he whined. And when he quieted down, we would come back and talk to him/play with him, and give him attention. Don't get me wrong-- he did NOT like to be in the crate and was mad at us. But when he did the right thing, we tried to reward him with our presence to try to make it a little more pleasant for him. When he was in the crate, sometimes we would try to play with him and pet him through the wires. Sometimes he would be mad and try to nip/gnaw on our hands and fingers. We didn't allow him to do that at all, and would absolutely ignore him and leave when he did that behavior. I think it worked because he doesn't do that now.

One thing I learned the hard way (though probably intuitive for a lot of people)... I felt like I was breaking my back, trying to put this 20 lb pup into the crate that he didn't want to go into... shoving him in there and then fighting to close the door as he tried to get out. After a couple weeks of this, one day it dawned on me to throw a great-tasting treat to the back of the crate. I would show him the treat first and then he would follow me as I threw the treat in. My puppy would go right in to eat it, nose first, and then it was easy for me to close the door-- voila! So much easier. I liked giving him treats that would take him 5 min to eat (ie. chicken wrapped yams or dried chicken chews), because it would take him some time to eat it-- so he didn't turn around quickly, and because it would occupy him so he doesn't whine for at least 5 minutes. I think it helped make the transition easier, as he was calmer after working on the treat. Because i have heard bassets will do anything for food (... mine is that way...), I was prepared to give him the greatest-tasting treat, if needed, such as hot dog or steak (but fortunately, didn't have to, as he was fine with the dog treats).

A couple weeks ago, (I would have never believed this...!), he started going into the crate to nap in there in the evenings!!! unbelievable! (he sleeps in our beds at night). I think it's like his "cave" now, and I have no doubt it can become your puppy's too... it just takes some time. Hang in there and don't get discouraged. It really can work. Good luck with everything!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Wworm, I will thank you for your words in greater detail later today - because right now Whiskey is sleeping in my lap and i only have one hand to type with lol
 

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Right now she's asleep on the couch. My husband and I take turns sleeping in the living room because she won't go in her crate for the night at all, but she can't be trusted to just roam free at night.

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This has worked for me over the years with lots of pups:

Temporarily put the crate next to your side of the bed. Put the puppy in with a soft blanket, you can put your hand near her she doesn't feel isolated. She should settle down and go to sleep. During the night when she has to go potty she'll start to fuss becasue she won't want to soil her blanket- get up, take her out to her potty place, wait til she potties and tell her she's a good girl, then bring her back to her crate. With young pups you might have to do this more than once each night.

This not only gets her used to the crate, it starts housebreaking: she learns that when she fusses you will take her out.

Our dogs don't sleep in the bedroom with us, after they got used to the crate we moved it- they now sleep in a downstairs room- we don't crate them anymore.

If you have to leave her in the crate give her something she gets ONLY WHEN IN THE CRATE that she loves- the heavy duty black kong stuffed with cream cheese, peanut butter, etc. will keep her busy for a long time and she'll start looking forward to going into the crate and getting a special treat.
 

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I'm thankful for all of your advice, I'm just so frustrated (and lacking MUCH sleep right now). I've tried a lot of the suggestions. Actually, pretty much everything and it all works until that door closes and even if she has food in there, she'll turn around and start barking.

My neighbors have already started banging on the ceiling, (and no, we do not have a good relationship with them at all, they are very mean people and have caused a lot of problems for us in the past).

The only way she'll sleep at night is if she's right there with me. I even tried keeping the crate by my side with my hand inside of it rubbing her, and she just kept coming right back out. When she goes inside, she got a treat and a rub, but again, once the door closed, she began howling.

I want to do right by my dogs, but I feel so out of my wits right now (due to lack of sleep), and because we aren't able to get her used to the crate, we can't properly house train her. We have puppy pads in certain locations (places she went right when we brought her home) and we have given her treats when she goes to the pads (but she hasn't yet gone to the bathroom on them). If I catch her peeing on the carpet, I grab her quickly and put her on the pad (I don't punish her either). But then she'll take two steps off of the pad and pee on the carpet.

I know it takes time, but I feel like I can't even start at square one. Rock and hard place.

I know I'm rambling. Sorry.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
LOL my husband just texted me from work saying, "You're both stubborn redheads . . . a battle of will was inevitable."

Ain't that the truth, haha.
 

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Update: Mikey I am going back and reading every inch of the articles you gave me (including any links within those articles). I realise that I'm probably moving too fast. I think I was worried because my other pups trained so quickly, and since this is MY dog in our house, I didn't want my husband (or anyone else) to think I was being neglectful if she wasn't being immediately crated or housebroken.

Now that I'm calm I'm going to print out these articles and discuss a schedule with my husband when he gets home from work.

Thank you again everyone. And sorry for being a total psycho on this board during my first few days as a new basset parent.
 

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You're already on the right track by coming here and asking for help. It's better to ask all your questions before they become huge problems. And we have no qualms about giving suggestions as you can see. That being said...when we decided to get Virga, we told our neighbor (we live in a duplex so we share a wall) that we were getting a puppy and that she'd probably be crying a lot especially at night when we'd put her in her crate for bed. She told us that that was fine and she couldn't even hear us anyway! So we got lucky in that respect.

But the best thing to do as has been said is to make it fun for her. You sound like you're starting on this already. Just be patient. Be more stubborn that the basset. Also, never let her out when she's crying. This has already been said as well. Just be patient and she'll get there eventually.

Do you still crate your other dog? I can't remember what you said. If so, could you put their crates in the same room so your pup has a little bit of company. We moved Doppler's crate into the room where Virga's crate is and she stopped whining pretty quick because she could see, smell, and hear another part of the family. It all goes back to them being pack animals. I feel like this works because one night I put Virga in her crate and took Doppler to bed with me and she whined for the first time in a while and I think it was because Doppler wasn't there with her. So maybe try that and see if it helps.

I'm sorry you're neighbors aren't very understanding. Good luck!
 

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because we aren't able to get her used to the crate, we can't properly house train her.
Many of a dog are successfully housetrained without ever using a crate. It makes supervision more important.


If I catch her peeing on the carpet, I grab her quickly and put her on the pad (I don't punish her either). But then she'll take two steps off of the pad and pee on the carpet.
Why are you even bothering Using a pad. It sounds like you live in an apartment. If the plan is to paper train the dog that is it does not go outside to do its business ever than pad training is ok. if it is just a transitional phase that is to first paper train then housetrain it is a bad idea, a very bad idea because it will confuse the dog and actual delay success in house training.


If I catch her peeing on the carpet, I grab her quickly and put her on the pad (I don't punish her either). But then she'll take two steps off of the pad and pee on the carpet.
There is probably very little but a subtle texural difference between the pad and carpet. The act of deffecating and peeing itself is self rewarding for the dog. The relief form pressure on the bowels adn bladder is ummm pleasurable. The dog will associate these good feelings with its suroundings. Whats above around, and under its feet, and seek these same things when it needs to go again. this is the basis of house training. Teach/training the dog to develop a substrate preference for what we want them to pee on. in the case of house training grass or urban setting pavement. It is not unusal to have a dog housetrained to go on grass that will never go on pavement when no grass is available and vice versa.
That is a second problem with pads the are two texturally similar to carpet they can cause confusion.

Secondly it is your resonsibility to confine the dog to the pad until it goes and not allow it to step off. If you are going to transition the dog to housetraining but you want to use an intermediate step or have a indoor paper training backup for times when access to the outdoors is too limited then this or a similar product is a much better choicec because the the much better substrate differential and more simiarity to natural grass. Potty Patch

I have used a crate on occasion to help in housetraining but never at night. These are a few thing that I have done to prevent accidents.

If you plan on having or do not mind having the dog sleep on the bed with you. You can attach a short leash to both the dog and your wrist. When the dog gets up tugging on the leash will awaken you, take the dog out, then back to bed.

Set the alarm for the middle of the night until the dog is 4-5 month older maybe even longer. Bassets IMHO are slower to develop sphincter control than other breeds. SO they can not old it as long as other breed or the rule of thumbs you will find published. Creating a schedual by getting up in the middle of the night prevents accidents and while it does interfere with sleep not as much as most other method because it does not take long to esptablish a quick routine and back to sleep.

FWIW the best arcticle i have found on the web in regard to house training and the importance of substrate preferance is Housetraining Your Puppy

Do not rely on a puppy to tell you when it's time to go out. That is expecting too much responsibility and communication at too early an age. It is up to you, the adult human, to know when he needs to go out. Watch his activity level and the clock.
A 12 wk puppy who is busy playing may need to urinate every 15-20 minutes, whereas a resting puppy might go for an hour, and a sleeping puppy can go 8 hours at night. Activity makes urine! Activity makes urine! Repeat this 10 times, slowly. This is a very important lesson for new puppy owners.

...OVER-REACT with joy when the pup goes. WOW!! Good Boy! Aren't you wonderful!! in a high pitched very happy voice. Be a clown for your puppy! Make him believe you think he is incredible for eliminating outside. Give him a treat and toss a ball or play chase or let him walk around and explore. You want him to learn that first he urinates, then the fun begins.
Since this is such an important part of training your pet, we use triple rewards, Praise, Treat and Play. Eventually he will go before you say the command. This is great!
The behavior behind this training: Dogs develop substrate preferences for eliminating. By substrate, I mean what they feel under their feet. In their first few weeks of life they need their mother to lick them to stimulate elimination. Around 4 weeks of age they begin to control this themselves. It is a self-rewarding behavior because it feels good. They associate this good feeling with the environment they are in at the time. This is about the same time they are walking well enough to go outside. If they are taken outside enough, several times a day, during this period of development (4 through 8 weeks) they will associate the good feeling of relieving themselves with the grass under their feet, the sky above, and all the smells and sounds of the outdoors. The tactile experience, the texture under the feet, becomes the cue.
If your puppy does not already have this outdoor experience, then you can provide it for him now, to retrain the "substrate preference" he has already learned. Take the pup out about once per hour. This is after play, eating, sleeping, etc. If the puppy can't hold his urine from the crate to the back door while walking, carry him for the first week or so. After a busy play session, take the puppy out, even if it's only been 15 minutes since he last went out. Physical activity produces urine. Inactivity slows the production of urine. This is why a puppy can sleep all night without wetting in the crate, but will urinate on the floor as soon as you let him out of the crate.
house training
When the dog is left at home alone, it would be smart to confine it to a small area, such as an outdoor run or a single room indoors (the kitchen or utility room), so that if the dog eliminates, it will do little damage and, therefore, not upset the owner.
If you don’t have a yard or a kitchen, or if you live in a small studio apartment with wall-to-wall carpeting on the 27th floor, then improvise. Build a smaller playpen for the puppy/dog with a dog bed in one corner and a doggy toilet in the other. Take up the carpet or, in the dog’s playpen, cover the carpet with several layers of plastic sheet and put a piece of tough linoleum on top.
For a doggy toilet, use sheets of newspaper or a litter box. However, if you want the dog to eliminate outside eventually, it is helpful to use outside items like soil in the litter box or a couple of concrete pavement slabs – perhaps even a roll of turf. This is passive training: By the time the pup is old enough to be walked outdoors, it will have already developed a strong substrate preference for eliminating on concrete or soil.
 

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I realise that I'm probably moving too fast.
Probably not what you want to hear but I do not think it is possible to truely have a house train a basset before the age of six months and a year is more typical they seem slow to mature the sphnicter control to be truely house trained.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
And we have no qualms about giving suggestions as you can see.
Thank goodness for that! LOL!

She told us that that was fine and she couldn't even hear us anyway! So we got lucky in that respect.
Very lucky indeed! We live in a two story apartment complex with four apartments on each side of the building, two upstairs and two downstairs. The couple to the side of us recently bought a chihuahua puppy so they seem to understand. The ones to the corner of us don't hear anything, but the ones directly below us are a nightmare.

When we first moved in, a couple of our friends were helping us move and they brought their two years old with them. He was excited to see a new place, so he was just running around on our balcony (no more than any other child would) and when we went downstairs to introduce ourselves to our neighbors, we said, "Hi, we just moved in and wanted to say hello." and they replied with, "That brat isn't moving in with you is he?"

They also asked my husband to teach our pug to not run in the house or they would report us. Apparently they reported the couple that lived here before we moved in all the time.

It just bothers me because they have two children (one of which thinks it's cute to come up onto our balcony, leave her toys (and food) in front of our door and peek in our windows, and they have a small boy who is under two years old and cries all the time, but we've never once said anything like, "Hey, teach your kid not to cry". Frustrating. It would be something totally different if were were throwing keggers at 3am or played heavy metal at 5 in the morning or something.

Sorry . . . I vent.

Do you still crate your other dog?
Yes we do and she is amazing. We just say, "Willow, got to bed," and she turns and walks into her crate no problem. She even didn't have a problem with it when we gave her crate to the new puppy (because of size issues) and got her a bigger one. She walked right into the bigger one as though she already knew it now belonged to her. The crate are side by side and Whiskey runs in and out of both of them all day long, but refuses to stay inside of either of them.

When we had a chihuahua puppy a while back she would cry at night in her crate until I let both dogs sleep in the same one. Then they cuddled and were fine. But Whiskey won't even have that.

Thankfully right now they are both napping on their big bed next to my computer.

 

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Many of a dog are successfully housetrained without ever using a crate. It makes supervision more important.
I'm replying as I read this so I hope I don't answer my own questions as I go. Do you have any articles on house breaking without a crate? I would love to read them. I've never done it myself as all of my dogs have either been crate trained, or trained to use a doggy door (but since we now live in a 2nd story apartment, that option is out).

Why are you even bothering Using a pad. It sounds like you live in an apartment. If the plan is to paper train the dog that is it does not go outside to do its business ever than pad training is ok. if it is just a transitional phase that is to first paper train then housetrain it is a bad idea, a very bad idea because it will confuse the dog and actual delay success in house training.
Okay, I've always read that to housebreak a dog, you start them on pads and then slowly move the pad to the door so they slowly begin to associate it with outside. It's how my family has always done it, so I've never known another way.

It is not unusal to have a dog housetrained to go on grass that will never go on pavement when no grass is available and vice versa.
Okay that makes a lot of sense. Our pug was trained on sand and dirt, so when we moved to an apartment that had a grass area, it took her a while to adjust.

Creating a schedual by getting up in the middle of the night prevents accidents and while it does interfere with sleep not as much as most other method because it does not take long to esptablish a quick routine and back to sleep.
Thankfully my husband works a late shift, so we might be able to get all of this scheduled without either of us ever really needing to wake up. I usually go to bed from 10pm-6am, and he gets home at 1am and goes to sleep from 4am-noon.

FWIW the best arcticle i have found on the web in regard to house training and the importance of substrate preferance is Housetraining Your Puppy
Just as I thought, you answered my earlier question LOL.
 

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Whiskey is a little cutie! (I was a big fan of Dollhouse also :) )

I can remember when Annie was a tiny dog I used to get up a various hours of the night to let her out of her crate to use the puppy pads I had placed everywhere on my floor, she would find the 2 inch square that I had not covered to do her business. She has always been crated at night, since the day I brought her home and now responds to "get in bed" by doing just that. Still at age 6 there are nights when I know she isn't sleeping in there, just watching for me to make a move so she can whine a bit and see what it gets her. I have finally learned to listen for specific noises...some are just "I'm lonely" whines and some are more incessant "Let me out now, woman!" noises.

You'll get there with your little one too.
 

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I can say that Mikey is VERY right about setting a schedule for potty times at night. I was getting very frustrated until I started doing this. At the time, I was caring for my puppy alone but it still worked wonders for potty training. With that said, it took almost a year for Rosco to be fully house trained. Perhaps with another house trained dog around it will take less time but just be prepared that it might take a little longer than the average puppy. Like others have said, you just have to be more stubborn than the hound.

Don't feel bad about asking so many questions. My husband first joined the boards here for that same reason. Everyone here is a wonderful source of info and very happy to help (If for no other reason than to have someone else say, I've been there too).
 

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Awww, your new pup is very cute and has pretty markings.

Anyway, keep coming back here; I'm a first time basset owner (Boomer, who is now 10 months), and have found a wealth of information and lots of nice people. :)
 
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