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Hello, to all
I am a new Basset owner. I have a female,her name is Bella. She is tri colored. 5 months old and the most stuborn sweetie I've ever had the privlidge of knowing. Now you did get that I did'nt say owned. This is because, I don't own her. We all know that!
I've been reading your blogs almost everyday and decided to join. Thanks for all the good tips. Bella can be, what am I saying? ...... She is a hand full, so I need all the help I can get. Thanks for being here
 

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Congratulations on Bella!! She sounds just like our Maxwell. He'll be 5 months on May 21. He is also extremely stubborn, but also so cute, funny, and even sweet at times. We've only had him since the beginning of April, but we don't remember life without him. We also appreciate all the advice on here since we're new at this too. Please post a photo of Bella. Can't get enough basset photos!!
 

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Well welcome to you from all of us in Snickersland! Hope you enjoy all the stories and useful info! It has gotten me through a lot. This is the first basset in our family as well, and every day has been a blessing and a curse all wrapped into one!
So like the diaper commercial says: Enjoy the ride:)
 

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Thanks everyone for the warm welcome and I will post a photo of bella asap.

PS. all your puppies are so wonderful!!!!
 

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I'm not sure stubborn is the right word for bassets. Now when I had beagles they were stubborn, but with bassets I think there is a more subtle thought process involve.

Sort of like when you tell them to do something, they think: "Can I do that?, Do I want to do that? What's in it for me?

Find treats she likes and keep them handy. Bassets can be bribed.
 

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What's in it for me?
Exactly... that's what our basset's thought is... Hmm... what's in it for me. If it's a treat that one or the other really likes then they move a lot faster on the come command. If they know I have something in the cookie jar that they can take or leave (not all that fond of) then they take their time. LOL. :p
 

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Find treats she likes and keep them handy. Bassets can be bribed.
Bribery is a very slippery slope when it comes to training. That is
1. you get compliance but not learning

2. It requires have a bribe in hand to get compliance

This lead to the lememant by non-food using trainers that thoses that use food rewards are always stuck using them which is not true if you don't bribe but is true if you do.

In stead of bribeing us food as a lure at first. That is say your teaching a sit. Put food in your hand . place hand in front of the dogs nose. Slowly move the food To the rear of the dog head and up just slightly. As the dog follows the treat with its head moving up and back it has no choice but to sit to maintain balance as soon as the sit occurs give the dog the treat. The most imporant part of luring however is removing the lure as quickly as possible an replacing it with a reward that is presented after the desired behavior not before. This is done after follow multiple repetition with a lure. Simple perform the same gesture without the food. The dog is likely but not guaranteed to excute the behavior if it does reward big time. Multiple treats. Then Continue training the gesture with out the lure. Pretty soon you have a physical cue to sit. By luring, fading the lure and rewarding the behavior instead of creating the behavior only in the presence of food like a bribe. You create the expectation of a reward even if no food is present. This mean when the dog is calculation the advantages and disadvantages of complying the presences of food is low on that list because of a high number of occances when the food reward happens even though it was not out in the open to start,.

when I had beagles they were stubborn, but with bassets I think there is a more subtle thought process involve.
I have trained 4 bassets and 3 beagles in agility, Of the four bassets 3 have reach the top level of competition in at least one venue and the fourth was retired early due to a minor injury the beagles on the other hand I got one a single novice title. I find training bassets infinitely easier than training beagles.


they think: "Can I do that?, Do I want to do that? What's in it for me?
the last being the most important. but this is true of most so call "hard to train" breeds you might find the following interesting on just this subject. ie, the questions dogs ask.

Hard to Train?

A look at "difficult-to-train" breeds and the reality of what shapes these canine minds.

it may require a subscription/registration to the site to veiw article but it is free and you will not be innundated with spam if you do, it isa means for the author to control copyright.
 

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Hey! I am also a new basset owner. Looks like our bassets are about the same age. Charlie (my 4.5 month old female basset) was born at the end of December. I agree with Hig4s that bassets definitely take the time to think "Do I want to do this?" Some people say bassets aren't smart, but really, it is my belief that they just do what they want on their own time. Is that a pretty big intelligence in itself?!

How is training going for you? We do use treats for Charlie, but she often will do a trick for us just for a simple praise "good job" or a tummy rub. She knows a handful of tricks but sometimes will resort to doing all of them with out being commanded to do so if we have a treat in our hand. ha. Here is a link to a video I posted of her doing her tricks:

Are you crate training? Isn't life just great now that you have a basset? Great choice in dogs:) Congratulations and have fun watching Bella grow up!!
 
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