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Hello, I am completely new here and pretty much new to the whole scene of puppies in general. I've always wanted a basset hound and have researched them a lot. I've spent the last week or so reading and have discovered all the bad things about puppy mills. From what I have read, I will not be buying a puppy directly online, from a newspaper, or from a pet store because of the extremely high percentage chance that they are from puppy mills or back yard breeders and by buying these puppies you are just enabling the awful system.

I've seen prices of bassets anywhere from $300-$1200. Is it possible to get a basset for around $500 that is from a "reputable" breeder. I'm not looking for a show dog, I just want a pet to love. I've considered adopting as well, but I'm leaning more towards a puppy. Since I do not want to buy from a backyard breeder or a puppy mill, I've searched for some basset hound breeders online that have an established history and pictures of their kennels. I have no problem driving to pick up a puppy as far as 5-6 hours, or just to check out a breeders environment to decide if it is "reputable". Also I can't seem to find a for sure definition of a "reputable" breeder other than opinion. Is a reputable breeder only a breeder of show dogs that cost $1200 and up? I have a hard time believing that there are no honest breeders that genuinely care about the breed that are responsible and produce healthy dogs but not necessarily these $1200 and higher show dogs. My point is that I want to buy a puppy and I don't want to contribute to a bad cause, but also don't feel like I should have to pay that much for a good hound from a good breeder. I could be wrong here, that's just how I feel.

As I mentioned above, I've found some breeders online that appear to have the best interest in the breed and not "profit driven" (pictures of kennels, completely open to questions, they want you to come look at their kennels, have a lot positive feedback from purchasers). So here are 2 main breeders I found that I am interested in and would be able to drive to to check out. Has anyone heard of these or got a hound from these and are they legit?

BFH Bassets , Basset Hound Breeder, AKC Registered Basset Hound puppies

Basset Hounds, AKC Registered Puppies, Breeder, Roy's Bassets

Also, what questions should I ask a breeder?

I have many questions and want to be well educated before I do get a dog and I'm open to learning and ready to put in the time to educate myself. Thank you all in advance for helping, I have already learned so much from reading on this forum even before my first post. Thanks again!
 

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Here we go again

There is a great debate on this forum about reputable breeders............in another thread titled "Looking for a Basset Breeder". My experience has been to have patience until you find someone who cares about providing you with a really good puppy rather than making a sale. It takes research but it also takes patience. Go to some dog events, any kind of event will bring in people who love dogs. When you find the right breeder, you will know. Follow your gut instinct and be patient!
 

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Also I can't seem to find a for sure definition of a "reputable" breeder other than opinion. Is a reputable breeder only a breeder of show dogs that cost $1200 and up?
Just like the definitions of Puppymill and BYB there are some general parameters but an individual is able to tweek around the edges to suite their prefference.

1. a reputable breed breeds for the betterment of the breed not profit,
to that end

a. the breeder show in either conformation or events designed to test the suitability of the dog for its original purpose. to gain unbiased feedback on the quality of the breed program

b. Works to limit/eliminate genetic disease from the breed.
i this can be acomplished through genetic testing for those desease in which a genetic marker exists

ii. physical exam ie. oaf, cerf before breeding for genetic conditions that show early ie hip displasia.

iii Pedigree research and extensive knowledge of progeny and siblings of those dogs to understand likelihood of carrier status of genetic dieases that do not show up until that later year, ie hypotyroidism.

the sell "PET QUALITY" dog with limited registration, manditory spay nueter contract, discount for spay/nueter. early spay/nueter to prevent contributing to the breeding of lessor quality breeds

They take responsibility for every dog they produce, this mean taking back any dog they sell when ever the owner is no longer able to care for it, no matter the reason.

That is the basic crux of a reputable breed, Thing like what genetic tests vs pedigree research on thinks is important is debateable. Same for what provisions to take to prevent breeding of lessor stock, etc.

IMHO on of the most important aspects to breeding that is not realy ever touched upon is the socialization and habituation the breeder does, this can have a profound effect on the pups lifetime behavior. see Puppy Socialisation and Habituation (Part 2) How to go about it but it is not really a criteria inwho is reputable or not, but if I were chosing a breeder it would be critical.

Is it possible to get a basset for around $500 that is from a "reputable" breeder
Yes every breeder is different, Often a reputable breed will have an adult returned dog, a show dog failure ect, an older, ie not puppy available and they are if available are at a cost less than you mention. The advantage of an older dog is that what you see is what you get their personality is more ridgedly set, A puppy is much more of a crap shoot.

So here are 2 main breeders I found that I am interested in and would be able to drive to to check out. Has anyone heard of these or got a hound from these and are they legit?
Non are non to be involved in fraud so from that standpoint legit, Neither appear to meet the criteria for reputable. Niether mention any showing in conformation nor field trials. Roy includes prices which is a clear indication of a profit motive and he is a natorious BYB whoses dogs are severly lacking in quality. The Health guarantee of
BFH is a joke. most life threatening congential and genetic problems show up much later than a year. From the health guarantee it is clear She does not take a lifetime trust of the dog she produces, though else where it is claimed otherwise. There is no indication that she is doing what it takes to improve the breed by getting Unbiased outside judgment. Does not appear to be to proud of here current breeding stock as there is no information on them.

for a comparison here are a few websites of reputable breeders
Topsfield Basset

Spectrum Basset

cloverhill Bassets

Castlehill Bassets

Chasen Bassets of LA

A start at locating reputable breeder can begin with the BHCA breeders list

Questions to Ask a Dog Breeder

Questions to ask a Breeder
 

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As you yourself stated there is a variation of opinion as to the definition of a reputable breeder and it can make your head spin trying to find one matching a particular criteria. Your objective should be to find a breeder with healthy well adjusted puppies. Do your research so you will know what to look for in a pup, such as one that isn't timid, or overly bossy. Choosing a puppy that shows the right characteristics can prevent a lot of problems down the road.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
As you yourself stated there is a variation of opinion as to the definition of a reputable breeder and it can make your head spin trying to find one matching a particular criteria. Your objective should be to find a breeder with healthy well adjusted puppies. Do your research so you will know what to look for in a pup, such as one that isn't timid, or overly bossy. Choosing a puppy that shows the right characteristics can prevent a lot of problems down the road.
Thanks for the advice. The main thing for me is to find someone who actually screens buyers. That seems to me to be the nucleus of someone who cares, someone who cares more about the dog than their own bank account.

Is there a document I can ask a breeder for to prove that the sire/dam of the puppy have been tested for hip dysplasia, glaucoma, or any other genetic problems common in the breed?

Testing for genetic problems before breeding and screening buyers are the most important things to me. Is there anything else I should look to require in choosing a puppy? I guess it comes down to opinion after so much scrutiny?

Thanks again for the help!
 

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Does this mean everyone on this list is reputable?
Every one on the list is likely to show or do Field trials though the are not forced to BHCA is the Parent club of basset hound to the AKC. There is a code of ethic that the agree to adhere to but enforcement is another matter and there is not someone doing inspection so the screening is still left to the buyer but you are starting out at a higher level.

For instance a few year Back there was a Very well known basset breeder that Came to find out that there Was Glaucoma in their line. and wrote an impassioned plea about testing, unreliability of testing research in finding a genetic marker a different test that might be more useful etc. However there have be some to claim that such plea rings hollow as they knew years earlier they had a glaucoma problem and swept it under the rug and know when they could no longer hide it the come out with this a counter university research in to genetic marker competing against the research at another university BHCA was financial supporting.
One side of the story What really is the case I have no Idea, but the point is Just because you do all the testing, There is no quarantee that there will be no gentic defect. It is well know fact that two OFA excellent hip can and do produce displastic ones estimate areas high as 20% of the time. There are no guarantee only a lessening of the odd.

Is there a document I can ask a breeder for to prove that the sire/dam of the puppy have been tested for hip dysplasia, glaucoma, or any other genetic problems common in the breed?
OFA for hips and elbow displasia, Penn Hipp measure laxicity in the hips not hip dysplasia but many think it is superior. That opinion is not without it nay sayers as well there is no conclusive evidence one way or another, CERF for gentic eye condition however glaucoma is not one of them. It was once thought that eye angles played a part in glaucoma with bassets but dog with open, closed and normal angle hav contracted it. current theory is the predominate cause of glaucoma in bassets is goniodysgenesis this can be check with a gonioscopy. at the time of a "cerf" test or a later date.

Let us get to hip displasia, very few basset have been test. And there is a ligitamate reason. The dwarfism that cause the basset to have short legs effect the hips as well. making the socket shallower than normal. There has never been a basset that rated as having OFA excellent hips. And you know the dogs test are only the one that breeder though would have good hips to begin with. But even though Basset Rank among the worst breed for hip displasia hip Dysplasia by Breed they are not one of the breed general effected by it. They carrie a lesser percentage of their weight on there rear, have massive bone mass to spread out the load do they have less pressure on the joint. and the short legs apply much less torque to the joint as well. So most get a long fine with a Joint that would become arthritic and painfull in a taller dog. So the question is just because you can diagnose a problem is it really one if it never manifest itself in any symptoms? FWIW My current agility dog 9 year old Mariah was diagnosed as mildly displastic. This is a bast that will jump from floor to Kitchen table from a standing start. And has done multiple time as much ruming and jumping than the average basset with out ever having any rear leg pain or injury and I don't expect it will ever happen,

Canine Hip Dysplasia Part IV
Canine hip dysplasia can be difficult to diagnose, as a number of other orthopedic neurological, autoimmune and metabolic problems may mimic it. Controversy surrounds the question of positioning for hip X-rays and what part joint laxity plays in hip dysplasia. Hip dysplasia may be more common in large and giant breeds and is one of the most over-diagnosed and misdiagnosed conditions.

In this article we address the issue of orthopedic registries. Given the widespread incidence of canine hip dysplasia, registries are not just nice to have; they are essential until we have a DNA or other genetic test available for screening and breeding.

The name of this article might well have been titled "Hip Dysplasia: The Controversy." We find that the various registries and the various diagnostic bodies have their own separate agendas, much of which seem to be mutually exclusive. The reader must understand that there are few definitive answers concerning hip dysplasia, and those that are more definitive than others are so only through the power of statistics and at the expense of the other theories. Generally accepted practices, and widespread acceptance of many popular beliefs and status of a given registry, seem to have little scientific basis.
CANINE HIP DYSPLASIA - PART V
For example: the German Shepherd Dog, with its feet out somewhere in the lower 40 acres, experiences a lever and fulcrum action that exerts more force on the hip joint than if the legs were underneath the dog. It may well be-and is according to some of the veterinarians and breeders who have written in response to the earlier articles in this series-that the German Shepherd Dog must have tighter hips with deeper acetabular cups than other breeds if its hips are to be considered normal. These are issues that bring into question the practice of relying solely on radiographic evidence of hip dysplasia when there are no other clinical signs. He’s 10 years old, moves like a dream, but…bad hips by radiograph. Is this a dog that has bad hips, or is there some problem with the definition of good hips?

Controlling canine hip dysplasia in Finland
which as very strict testing and breeding controls

In nine breeds included in this study ± (boxer, Doberman, English cocker spaniel, flatcoated, golden and Labrador retriever, German Shepherd dog, rough collie and Rottweiler) significant changes in hip-dysplasia prevalence were detected. However in four breeds ± boxer, Doberman, German Shepherd dog and rough collie ± the prevalence increased. Our study could not support the previous studies which found significant overall decrease in disease prevalence (Brass, 1989; Swenson et al., 1997); instead, our
findings support those of the studies that found distinct between-breed variation (FluÈckiger et al., 1995; Willis, 1997). The effectiveness of strong official breeding restrictions is also questionable: German shepherds have had restriction the longest time and showed significant increase in dysplasia prevalence ± but Rottweilers joined the program only recently and prevalence had decreased already before joining the scheme.
Also, we could not show significant differences in effectiveness between the breeds with or without breeding restrictions.

Elbow dysplasia is probably even more common the hip displasia and I say probably because not enough breed have even tested for it for OFA to post the result. Again this is much like hib dysplasia in that basset are much more likely to suffer from it because of dwarfism, however unlike hip displasia it is more often likely to cause a problems later on. That said even for dogs with elbow incongruities they are almost never the cause of fornt end limbing in a basset and it is exceedingly rare for a basset not to have some degree of incongruity in the elbow.

All these orthorpeadic condition are only partly heritable to begin with other factor play a part as well like nutrition, mothers health when dog in the womb etc. So even with testing the result of reducing hip dysplasia through testing is spotty at best. There have been some remarkable success with some breed in some countries but it is thouroughy inconsistent so inconsistent their are incidents that the rate of hip dysiplasia have actual increased since testing. So the effectiveness of testing is suspect.

There area number of bleeding disorder. Von wilbrandts has a number of genetic factor and there are genetic test for each but thye are only available for select breeds. There is still studing going on to provide a genetic test for basset but at this time there is not one. A blood test for Vwd factor can be somewhat helpful it is not conclusive. It can weed out the effected but it can not with any measure of certainty seperate effected and carriers and carrier and unaffected because the variability in how the faulty gene is expresed in that it still produce some factor just not the amount it should. There is a genetic test or Basset hound Thrombopathia, but it is not a common problem. Other condition that have at least some genetic component Seborrhea (rarely even screened for) allergies, hypothyroidism, epilepsy etc can only be control through pedigree analysis and this requires a vas knowledge of the off spring and siblings of the dogs in the pedigree it is a rare breeder that applies this to the condition mentioned again because it is not know what part/percentage genetic plays a part.

FWIW here is BHCA Health Policy
The structural ramifications of achondroplasia (dwarfism) are of considerable significance in this breed. The more common genetic disorders reported in Basset Hounds include: glaucoma; thrombopathia; von Willebrand’s disease; hypothyroidism; patellar luxation; hip dysplasia; and elbow dysplasia (osteochondritis dissecans, fragmented medial coronoid process, ununited anconeal process). Temperament reflects genetic as well as environmental determinants. Poor temperament is as debilitating as any serious genetic disorder.


BHCA encourages responsible breeding through screening for the more common genetic disorders known to affect Basset Hounds. BHCA believes that the following tests yield useful information that may assist responsible breeders in their selection of Basset Hounds to be used for breeding:
  1. Gonioscopy (examination of the iridocorneal angle of the eye for abnormalities which may predispose the eye to the development of glaucoma) and eye examination, performed by a veterinary ophthalmologist, resulting in eligibility for Canine Eye Registry Foundation (CERF) registration.
  2. Thrombopathia genetic testing is available through Dr. Mary Boudreaux's laboratory at Auburn University College of Veterinary Medicine (see Health Issues section for referral form).
  3. von Willebrand’s factor antigen testing.
  4. Thyroid testing, to include at least on full thyroid panel.
  5. Radiographs (x-rays) of hips and elbows with evaluation by a recognized registry, e.g. Orthopedic Foundation for Animals (OFA), PennHip, Institute for Genetic Disease Control in Animals (GDC), Ontario Veterinary College (OVC).
  6. Temperament evaluation, as evidenced by Puppy Aptitude Testing or American Temperament Test Society, Inc. (ATTS) certification.
As for other things to consider I think knowing what the breeder is doing to habituatethe puppy because this becomes cirtical in minimizing behaviorial issues later in life. Behavioral issues are more prevelent cause of death in dog under the age of three than infectious diseases. The importance of early socialization and Hibituation can not be understated.


The more the breeder test for or does physical exam etc vs using knowledge of the pedigree the more expensive the pups are likely to be. Non of these test are cheap and some a very expensive. And while most breeder loose money there is a limit to how much they can subsidize the buyer. There is question on hw effect any screening actual is. etc So fiar minded individules could rational debate which an what test to perform vs pedigree analyis or other assement method.

While it is easy to say tha a breeder should test for all genetic disorders the reality of the situation is not that simple and there is a whole lot of grey area to navigate of which actual effectiveness is not an insignifactant concern
 

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Mine are pure with papers. I never had any intent to show them. They were less than $300.00. I would never pay $1200.00!! I suggest to look in your local newspaper to see if there are any listed for sale. You will find one that you love. (prob the first one you see! )
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Mine are pure with papers. I never had any intent to show them. They were less than $300.00. I would never pay $1200.00!! I suggest to look in your local newspaper to see if there are any listed for sale. You will find one that you love. (prob the first one you see! )
Just knowing its pure is only one thing. I also want to know the puppy doesn't have any genetic diseases and I would like to be able to see the breeding environment and meet the mother and father.
 

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also want to know the puppy doesn't have any genetic diseases
This is an impossible standard for ANY BREEDER TO meet the following reasons If you actual have a breeder tell you or guarantee that there breeding are free from genetic defects run, run quickly.

1. there are likely a fair number of genetic disease that breeders, vet etc don't know even exist Predelection for a particular cancer and other disease is one. There are some thoughts out there that there may be some genetic basis for some of these disease but if it does exist it is not clear to what extent and just what the mechanism is Immpossibe to breed against a problem whose existance in unknown.

2. Some know disease like HD have no solid genetic test and are likely polygentic cause by more than one gene or the interaction of multiple genes There is only physical phenotype test and these are not fool proof. It has been shown that sires with good or excellent hips through dogs with HD ~20% of the time. This if far less than the precentage with sires both with bad hip or sires on with good hip and one with bad, but still a bit of a crap shoot.

3. there are a number of genetic condition or condition with what is thought to have some genetic components, allergies, sheborrhea that are not life threatening and manageable. while it would be nice to elimiate or at least minimize these in light off more dangerious condition they will likely be over looked.

4. The cost of all the testing is high. The more a breeder test for the higher the price of the pup is generally going to be. It is rare a breeder recoups all their expenses but if losses are too great they simply will not breed.

The best you can hope for is the breeder takes reasonable (an reasonable is always in the eyes of the beholder) measure to ensure that they breed dogs in such a manner as to produce puppies unaffected by genetic conditions. This would be much simpler if the did not have also some what competeing and equally important interest in producing dogs with sound temperament, conformation and working ability. Breeding becomes a big balancing act of competeing interest than one must maintain in relative balance.
 

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This is an impossible standard for ANY BREEDER TO meet the following reasons If you actual have a breeder tell you or guarantee that there breeding are free from genetic defects run, run quickly.

The best you can hope for is the breeder takes reasonable (an reasonable is always in the eyes of the beholder) measure to ensure that they breed dogs in such a manner as to produce puppies unaffected by genetic conditions. This would be much simpler if the did not have also some what competeing and equally important interest in producing dogs with sound temperament, conformation and working ability. Breeding becomes a big balancing act of competeing interest than one must maintain in relative balance.
Thanks for clearing that up Mikey. I want is a breeder who makes an effort to produce a healthy puppy!
 

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Mikey T has provided a very extensive article that should help you.

And, here are some more tips for you:

Go to your local Basset hound club (the one sanctioned by BHCA and AKC).
Join their activities, attend one of the show, and talk and ask questions to a LOT of the member (and the breeders) there about Basset and your interest in finding one as the addition to your family..Sometimes, they also will bring the puppies to the show.. You will get a chance to see them in person.

A good breeder should not be apprehensive when you told them that you want to visit their place to see how they care for their bassets. In fact, most will require you to come and check their facility.

They will probably ask you a lot of questions concerning your home and how you will take care of the puppy, if they decided to let you have one. Don't be apprehensive if they seem to prod and want to know more. It's one of a good sign showing that the breeder actually care more about giving their puppy a good home than making a profit.

Since most reputable breeders breed show quality dogs, chances are you will have a show quality puppy with minor defect(s) that disqualify the puppies from being shown (by defects, I don't mean genetic disease or behavioral problems.. think something along the line the puppy's shoulder is broader than the show standard, or his rib is not perfectly symmetrical, or he is a bit too tall than the AKC standard). These defects should not cause health problems and should not disqualify the puppy from being a lovely addition to your family. Of course, the most perfect puppy will be kept by the breeder (insert 'duh sound effect here).

Depending on the breeder, they will let the puppy (generally, a male) to go to a new family under a co-owned contract. This means that both the breeder and you owned the puppy. and, that means the breeder will have a say to whether or not you should neutered your puppy. Also, if your puppy turned out to be a show quality dog, the breeders has the right to borrow him once in a while to be shown at a confirmation show or use him as a stud. Read the contract and see if you have no problem with the clauses.

A good breeder should have a contract to sign that list specifically on what they guarantee. Mikey T has provided you with those info and the fact that sometimes, even with a very strict monitoring and breeding guidelines, some genetic defect can creep in.

O also, AKC papers just means that the lineage of the puppy is registered, and it is, indeed, a pure bred. It does not guarantee the health of your puppy; nor, guarantee the reputation of the breeder.

and, finally, lets get down to business side. Breeding puppies cost a LOT of money. Breeding best quality puppies and rigorously selecting and monitoring the best lineage costs even MORE money. A good breeder, even with 1200 dollars per pup, will probably not making any profit in the long run. The 1200 dollars, imho, worth every cents when you get the puppy from a good breeder.

I have two dogs in my home. One (a sharpei) is owned by my roommate and one (the basset) is mine. The sharpei is from a puppy mill (she got the puppy years ago when I am not her roommate). The guy who breeds the sharpei sold the puppies in front of home depot for a hundred bucks each. The sharpei was brought home by my roommate and grew up to be the most problematic dog I have ever seen in my life. Constant skin and ear infection, aggressive behavior, allergic to literally everything, non social, and has severe separation anxiety. She forked up close to 20,000 dollars for medication, training, and surgeries (both of his eyes is removed from severe glaucoma).

The sharpei now is in a LOT better condition. He is put under strict vegetarian diet by recommendation of the vet (since he's allergic to everything).

My basset -Gus-, on the other hand, costs me 1500 dollars right from the start. I found the breeder from the recommendation of 5 people from the Basset club I visited. The breeder actively joins confirmation shows all over the US.. and won several championships. She also used to be the president of the club.

Gus is 7 months old now. He is the sweetest dog (and a clown). He gets along with the sharpei real well. He is very social. and, OMG, I swear he came home literally trained to wee wee outside. A couple of accidents happened because of the owner and his roommate forgot to open the french door to the backyard :p.

Gus helps tremendously calming down the sharpei's separation anxiety. Now, when my roommate or I left the house, the sharpei stays with Gus and play, instead of crying, wailing, and biting the door till his mouth bleeds.

The breeder I bought Gus from just happened to own a day care. So, Gus get a free day care and free bath for the rest of his life. When I need to be on vacation, the breeder told me that Gus is welcomed to stay in their house for the duration of my vacations free of charge. I took Gus to her daycare once a week to have socialization times with other dogs.

Gus always come home with free chewing treats that cost 5 buck a piece (tendon not rawhide), free treats, and free foods. Sometimes, I have to reject those free stuffs and actually pay for it.. I felt bad to keep getting things for free. But, the breeder insist that she want to spoil Gus cause he's part of her family. I calculate when Gus reach a year old (5 months from now), I practically got him for free.

When Gus diagnosed with localized demodex, the breeder made an effort to help. She provide weekly benzoyl peroxide bath free of charge.
Gus now almost recovers.
I am so lucky to meet the breeder. and, I have no problem forking that money. There is no doubt in my mind that the breeder truly does not breed to make a profit.

Now with that said, I understand that money, especially in this economy, is tight. In your situation, I would advice adopting a basset rather than getting a puppy. Your local basset hound club can also advice you where to go and what to do.

Hope that helps.. sorry for the long rant.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Now with that said, I understand that money, especially in this economy, is tight. In your situation, I would advice adopting a basset rather than getting a puppy. Your local basset hound club can also advice you where to go and what to do.

Hope that helps.. sorry for the long rant.
I e-mailed almost every breeder in the breeders list on the BHCA website that are within driving distance of my city. I have to say, 50% of the people on that list are either not breeders and have no idea why their name is on the list or their e-mail no longer exists. The list severely needs to be updated. All that aside, I have come in contact with some good breeders and am having e-mail conversations with them. One person recommended me to a breeder that is in my home state that I didn't know about. She, herself, isn't on the BHCA breeders list anymore because she used to breed for show but doesn't do it anymore but still breeds from her show champion. I have since been in contact with her as well.

Despite hip dysplasia being known as a susceptible disease to the basset hound, it is surprising how many breeders from the BHCA list told me that they have found it to be nearly non existent in the breed and not worth the time/money to test for it. The main concern is glaucoma.

I have to admit, talking to these reputable breeders has made me realize that I would be happy paying more for a puppy than I originally thought I would but I'm still not okay with anything over $1,000. Maybe my understanding will continue to grow and I will be fine forking it over soon! :D
 

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Basset Hounds, AKC Registered Puppies, Breeder, Roy's Bassets

Hello all, I am brand new here. But I just wanted to chime in and say about the above link. I bought my first basset for the above breeder in 2000, he just turned 10 in April.
He is my bestest friend and healthy, happy Basset.
Roy's Bassets, IMO, is one of the best. I drove from Nebraska, all the way to Alabama to pickup Otis Barnaby Brown when he was 8 weeks old. The kennels and grounds are immaculate, and the breeder actually cares and loves his dogs. The dogs are beautiful and super sweet.
Hope this helps.....
One more thing..... There are ALOT of Basset Hounds out there that need a loving forever home. I just adopted a super sweet 6 yr old basset from a family from Craigs List. I think that adopting is a far better solution than buying from a breeder anyways....
Thank you, Cindy
 

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Thanks for the advice. The main thing for me is to find someone who actually screens buyers. That seems to me to be the nucleus of someone who cares, someone who cares more about the dog than their own bank account.

Is there a document I can ask a breeder for to prove that the sire/dam of the puppy have been tested for hip dysplasia, glaucoma, or any other genetic problems common in the breed?

Testing for genetic problems before breeding and screening buyers are the most important things to me. Is there anything else I should look to require in choosing a puppy? I guess it comes down to opinion after so much scrutiny?

Thanks again for the help!
Well the thing there is that there aren't any breeders out there who are doing the OFA tests in the breed. When we had the tests done for hips and elbows we were the first in the database since 2007. However most reputable breeders will do the eye tests and hopefully the blood tests to screen for issues. If they have done the test they will be in the CERF database or should be able to provide you with a copy of the test results. I have a binder with all of our test results in it that I was going to show our puppy buyers if they asked. Unfortunately we only have the 3 puppies so it will just be our one owner who will need to verify it but at least we were ready to back our testing up.

Yes any reputable breeder should be screening their homes just as carefully as they have planned their breedings. It takes a long time to develop lines and do all the research into which match will produce the healthiest puppies.

I'd steer clear of the two "breeders" you mentioned... Roy's is definately a miller and I'd say the other is close as well as they have been inspected. Generally it takes selling a LOT of puppies in one year in order to make an inspection necessary... that to me screams puppy miller.

As for the breeder listing on the BHCA website... well it is each and every member's responsibility to make sure that their information is accurate and if not let the BHCA know. Unfortunately the secretary can't change the information without it being made known to them. But yes by contacting some on the list you should be able to get some references to other's in your area who may have upcoming breedings. I'm glad you've found some who you are interested in. I can say when we first went to a reputable breeder I thought $1000-$1500 was too expensive as well but after getting our little girl who was $1200 at the time I will tell you she was worth every penny and more as she has not had any health issues and is the most stable dog I've ever met temperment-wise. She is a wonderful show dog (even though it wasn't what we were looking for at the time) and has been a wonderful mother to her puppies thus far. We went the cheap route the first time we bought a puppy and we paid for it dearly in vet bills and losing our girl to a terrible form of cancer at 3 1/2 years old. If you care to read our story you can go to my website. I won't rehash it here.
 
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