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Hi.
I am looking at getting my first basset puppy in the next few months or so. I just lost my whippet of 14 years and am looking to slow down with the next hound. I have always been enamored with the breed and have been reading up on them for quite a while.
My partner and I currently own a chi and a golden. We do like variety! We also own a very nice reptile collection and use them in our free educational events and as personal pets. They are truly living art. Beautiful...but without the love and kisses that our pups give.
So I am ready for my long eared love!
I do however have a few questions.
I have been in contact with multible breeders from NJ to NC and have run into the same problem. Not one has been testing their adults for Von W. and other genetic problems. I have watched my parents buy dobies for years and I know that in dobies its a pretty big problem and quality puppies have parents that are tested. At the very least grandparents are.
I am stumped by the lack of testing. Is it just unnessisary? Is it so rare in bassets that it is not checked for regularly? It is listed as one of their health issues so I set it up as a priority...only to have gotten over a dozen replies saying they did not test. In fact not a single breeder has said that they do.
My other question is where do I find a reliable list of breeders since the basset club of america's site is down? Anyone throw me a bone somewhere in the midatlantic?
Anyway thanks so much! Here are a couple of pictures of my current babies just for fun!
 

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Not sure who these "breeders" are but they should be testing for such things as well as another bleeding disorder and the eyes at the very least. What do they say when you ask them about the testing? The BHCA website is up so try there again.
 

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Not sure who these "breeders" are but they should be testing for such things as well as another bleeding disorder and the eyes at the very least. What do they say when you ask them about the testing? The BHCA website is up so try there again.
They are saying that their dogs are "healthy" and the puppies get "vet checked" before they can come home. I have heard "The parents have not shown signs of it." or "None of my past puppies ever came back sick." Most seem vaguely insulting that I even asked.

I will try the website again thanks! I would have thought lack of testing was just backyard cheap breeders..but some of those were showing and they ranged from the stupidly cheap $350 (who listed her dogs as "rescued" in her email...yikes) to well over a grand and have gotten the same answers. So I was beginning to think I was overly paranoid.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Well so far the BHCA is a bust. All of the "breeders" they have listed have been either just members and not breeders at all...or are retired and long since have not had pups. I emailed a dozen people in my state last night and did not get a single real breeder. It's very very frustrating.
Are there any OTHER sources?
AKC, ACA BASSET HOUND PUPPIES *huggablebassets* Billy Linebeger Is one breeder I found who seems to do genetic testing. Anyone know anything about them? Are they reliable?
 

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First off Von W is not the problem in bassest it is in doberman. estimates are 80% OR HIGHER of all dobies are at least carriers. Secondly as of currently there is not a Genetic i.e. DNA test for Basset as there is for dobies and a number of other breeds for Von W. So if a breeder says they are doing a genetic test for Von W on basset they are full of B.S. The best there is a Von W factor blood test that will register high, middle or low range. The problem is while the test is good diagnostical, it is natorious poor genetically. Carrier routinely test as clean or affected and vice versa. While testing is good one also need to know the limits of testing as well. Having a broad knowlege of the line or lines bred and the history or lack of history of bleeding disorders is often more telling than any single test however it often requires a hell of a lot more work.

vWD Type I


Breeds Serviced

  • Bernese Mountain Dog
  • Coton de Tulear
  • Doberman Pinscher
  • Drentsche Patrijschond
  • German Pinscher
  • Kerry Blue Terrier
  • Manchester Terrier
  • Papillion
  • Pembroke Welsh Corgi
  • Poodle
  • Stabyhoun

vWD Type II
Breeds Serviced

Deutsch Drahthaar
German Shorhaired Pointer
German Wirehaired Pointer
Pointer

vWD Type III
Breeds Serviced

  • Scottish Terrier
  • Shetland Sheepdog
  • Kooikerhondje
DNA Studies in Doberman von Willebrand's Disease
. It is important to realize that this DNA test is very different from the old protein-based factor assay. The DNA test is definitive and final, a lifelong, permanent determination of the vWD status of each dog tested as contrasted to the factor assay, in which the levels could change drastically over time. We can now say in hindsight that the old test probably correctly identified some affected Dobermans (values under 20), but it is completely unreliable for carrier detection.
FWIW anyone associated with the ACA is likely not worth the time investigating as a breeder.
 

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ACA is one of the sham "registries" set up to provide BYBs and puppymillers with "papers" for their puppies. Their standards for registration are very lax, and no good breeder would be associated with them (or C(ontinental)KC, or APRI - both of whose "papers" ACA accepts).

As for the link provided, that site is so full of "red flags" it's not funny. Just reading their "guarantee" made me want to laugh and cry at the same time.

Here's an exercise - check out these articles:

http://blacksheepcardigans.com/ruff/dog-health/health-testing/how-much-does-a-puppy-cost-purchase-price-adoption-fees-discounts-expensive-puppies-cheap-puppies-and-a-bunch-of-other-words/

http://blacksheepcardigans.com/ruff/general/how-to-tell-a-good-breeder-website-from-a-bad-one/

http://blacksheepcardigans.com/ruff/general/the-myth-and-often-outright-deception-of-champion-lines/

http://blacksheepcardigans.com/ruff/family/puppies/were-responsible-breeders/


Then compare that breeder's site to these sites:

http://www.topsfieldbassets.com/topsfield%20and%20info%20sectionsa.htm

http://www.rebecbassets.com/

Can you see the difference? Can you spot the red flags in the "huggable" site?
 

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Are there any OTHER sources?
Check with the local breed clubs affiliated with the AKC/BHCA they usually have a person in charge of breeder referrals.

for BHCA Breeder referrals

Potomac Basset Hound Club

Valley Forge Basset Hound Club

Simply plug in the names of the Local Basset hound Clubs from the BHCA website into the search on the AKC site and you will get similar results for all the clubs.

Keep in mind a large number of reputable/show breeder do not feel the need to market themselves through the web. You will have to make the dreaded phone call. Also they are not likely to have a litter available but may be planning on one etc/ Most show breeders do not breed unless they have prospective homes for most if not all of a litter ahead of time.
 

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Well yes I see that those sites don't actually list pups for sale or even what is being bred. They also don't give a clue about price.
I personaly don't want to waste my time when a breeder is going to be asking 2500 bucks for a puppy (or more) and I can't possibly afford that.
I think that sometimes websites like those are pretty snobby actually.
I don't need a dog to be show quality. I don't care if they aren't.
I do care that the adults are tested for genetic problems...but the fact that they are out to sell pups and not out to show and primp for show ribbons is not a problem to me.
A healthy puppy is a healthy puppy. *shrugs*
A "good breeder" doesn't have to be showing...doesn't have to be not advertiseing...and doesn't have to be top caliber just to produce a great HEALTHY puppy for my own home. I see no reason for it.
Those are some of the problems that have caused issues in certain breeds in my opinon.
German shepards bred by "good breeders" are so baddly formed they have huge back/hip/whatnot problems. Were those traits caused by so called "bad backyard breeders" who were not showing but just picking good looking happy puppies? No...they were caused in great part by show people who cared more about the ring than the long term effects.

I think on this issue we will have to agree to dissagree.
 

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Okay then, let me go into some detail.

Our Parent are DNA tested.
Ask them exactly what they are testing for, and what are the results. There is only ONE health problem in bassets for which a DNA test exists - and I'm betting they don't know what it is. However, people who do lots of breeding are require to have a DNA PROFILE done on their dogs to prove parentage.

Each puppy comes with a 1 Year Genetics return policy
Useless. Nearly any serious genetic issue will not show up until the dog is much older.

If any major genetic health problem would develop with the heart, lungs, kidneys, or liver
Pretty safe, since none of these are a known problem in the breed.

We would take your Basset back to our home to care for and would replace it with a similar value puppy.
So you've had your puppy for, say, six months and he miraculously develops one of the problems that the guarantee covers, you're going to return it? They're betting that you love it too much to do so.

Once your puppy leaves our kennel, we are not responsible for any minor issues that occur within or after the (5) days of receiving it, such as parasites and or worms. These issues are resolved with medication from your vet.
A good breeder WILL cover parasites within this time, as they will likely have originated from the kennel.

If your vet finds any life threatening condition, you have the option of returning the puppy immediately and we will replace it with a puppy from the same litter.
However if your puppy has an issue that is not life threatening, you are on your own.

Buford's Champion Bloodline is "Canadian American"
"Buford"
Is from the HB
RusBud Bloodline
What a crock! Neither of those are bloodlines. "Canadian American" is meaningless and "HB RusBud" is just a combination of his parent's names. It all looks nice and important, but it's completely worthless.

we are not a puppy mill or back yard breeder
Generally speaking, anyone who feels the need to post that statement generally IS one of those. Like the "we're reputable breeders" statement mentioned in the article above, that phrase is a red flag.

As for "2500 bucks for a puppy (or more)", as far as I know you can get a well-bred pet pup from a good breeder for $1000-$1500 depending on where you live. Hmmm...with shipping these people charge right in the middle of that range for dogs that aren't nearly as good.

Oh, and they let pups go at 7 weeks - big no-no.

Now, I suggest you read those articles I posted above.
 

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health is a lot more than a a genetic testing. Genetic testing and DNA testing are two completely different things though DNA is used in both. DNA testing is for determining perantage exclusively it has nothing to do with disease. The exact number of genetic test available to basset hound breeders 1. for Basset hound Thrombopathia
an obscure bleeding disorder that only effect basset hounds see
Thrombopathia mutation identified

1. I pointed out the limited value of either OFA or Penn-Hipp in evaluating dysplasia in basset hounds and any other dwarf breed for that matter.

2. Cerf exam for the eye does not include gonioscopy which is the only diagnostic tool available for determining if a basset might develop gaucoma, and it is far from definative. What is definitive is knowing the breeding and health history of the pedigree and not just the dogs in the pedigree but the sibling and off spring of those dogs as well. This is information that is only actively collected by show breeders.
This goes for the entire host of genetic health issues from allergies to hypothyrodism and epilepsy etc. Without out definative diagnostic test the only alternative is the knowledge of prblems or lack of problem in a particular lines This is not obtained simply by knowing the dogs in the pedgree but the all the dog in the line. It is one reason unlike for profit breeder show breeder keep in contact with owners of dogs they produced it is the only way to collect the needed data to make intelligent breeding decisions that include heath. Everyone else is simply blindly throwing darts at the board hoping to miss a catatrophy.

see;
The Ins and Outs of Pedigree Analysis, Genetic Diversity, and Genetic Disease Control




Responsible Breeding Management of Genetic Disease




Breeding Strategies for the Management of Genetic Disorders


Breeding Healthier Dogs
Pedigree Analysis​


If there is no genetic test for carriers, then relative risk assessments can be used for genetic counseling. These are the risk figures that can be created for a specific animal to be affected (or a carrier) after examining the pedigree and knowing the genetic or phenotypic status of multiple family members. The technique involves a careful examination of the pedigrees of the proposed mates, called pedigree analysis. It involves the breeder (or genetic counselor) drawing a dog's pedigree not just with ancestral names but also with health information about each ancestor (if available.) Ideally this would include family members not included in a typical pedigree (such as littermates to individuals found in the pedigree.) If the breeder knows most of the health history of the dogs in the pedigree, then a picture of how a particular health characteristic is passed from generation to generation can begin to be formed.​

Managing Polygenic Disease: Canine Hip Dysplasia as an Example


Pedigree Analysis, and How Breeding Decisions Affect Genes

The Effects of Genetic Testing: Constructive or Destructive?

and educate yourself on the currently only effective means of combating genetic disease on dog populations for most genetic disease.
You will find statements like
German shepards bred by "good breeders" are so baddly formed they have huge back/hip/whatnot problems. Were those traits caused by so called "bad backyard breeders" who were not showing but just picking good looking happy puppies? No...they were caused in great part by show people who cared more about the ring than the long term effects
are absurb. While there have be some exageration that have occured in the show ring that do effect health these in general are simply overstated One need to keep in mind the vast majority of breeder is the US are not show/reputable breeder to place problems with the hughely popular breed like GSD and Labs at their feet is totally absurd. Especially when they make a up a tiny percentage of the breeder of these breeds. It is not without conincidence that in general the breed with fewer genetic health issues are the less popular breeds. That is because the percentage of breeders that truely care and do something about the issue is much higher. than those simply in it for profit. Quite simple there is no money to be made for limiting genetic disease from one breeding program it only cost money and a lot of time.

noted updated with more links since you post below
 
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