Basset Hounds Forum banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi Everybody,
We've had Beauregarde for a month now and love him so much. He's so sweet. We couldn't figure out why he ended up in a shelter to begin with. Now we know. Bo is an escape artist and I don't know what to do. We have a chain link fence around our backyard (old). As soon as I turn my back, he pushes underneath it and scoots out. I can't tell you how many times I've had to go get him in the neighborhood. He comes right back wagging his tail, like he has no idea what he did wrong. We've tried barracading the bottom of the fence with cinderblocks but he just finds another vunerable place to get low and push through.

He loves being outside and takes a long time walking around before he's ready to go potty. Right now, I have to sit outside with him and watch his every move. I just don't have time to sit outside for a half an hour several times a day. He won't poop while on the leash with me. He has to have backyard privacy, I guess. Has anyone had a problem like this? What did you do? We don't want to lose him.
Thanks,
Deb
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
360 Posts
Mine was like this in the beginning too. I got him from a shelter. I don't know if that has anything to do with it ...or if it's the naughty nature of the Basset Hound. They are adventuresome :lol: It was difficult in the beginning but I will tell you that it gets better, without a doubt. I can't say my Belvedere won't take off if he sees a squirrel or kitty crossing his path but he never tries to get out of the backyard.

I'd say just work on securing areas of your fence a bit at a time. Perhaps line the bottom of it with bricks or stones that will discourage him from pushing or digging out. As you've found out, they are single-minded when it comes to these things ...and then there's the social aspect of this. They want to go visiting! So take him often and make sure everyone in the neighborhood has been introduced to him. They will be on the look-out and will bring him back if he gets out. That was my first order of business when our little guy was in that phase. Keep his collar on him, with a clear address and phone number as well.

Work on getting a secure area for him. That's the best advice I can give. This is what they do :D

PS ...Both of mine require privacy to do their business. It rarely will happen on our leash walks. They have a chosen area of the backyard, which is out of view of any window or door.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
289 Posts
How about putting him on a stationary leash a few feet short of the fence? I have a feeling sooner or later he'll learn to go to the bathroom.

It's kind of funny; an anal retentive Basset.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
106 Posts
Securing the bottom of the fence to galvanized pipe stringers connected from post to post would keep him from lifting the chain link.

He doesn't dig, does he?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
245 Posts
.........has anyone else had problems like this"?---------you better believe it!
.......what did I do"?-----------pulled my hair out and ran all over the place looking for him only to see the Hound Face and tail wagging when he decided to come home for a cool drink of water a snack and then a good long nap.
Oh they know exactly what they are doing and having his 'privacy'---that is a hoot.
They have nothing to do but run us nuts worrying about them. I wish I could help but to say just don't give up and love him.
don
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,319 Posts
We used the wire stuff and secured the bottom of the fence into the ground as described above. We also bought an old railroad tie and put it around the base- that seemed to work the best
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,494 Posts
I think Dozer-Digger had a post on keeping her dogs out of the garden using an electric fence made for dogs. Type in "electric fence" in the Search area and it should bring up a picture. Maybe one strand of this along the bottom of the chain link might work for your escape artist.
Also we have placed the longer sturdy tent stakes (metal shaped like a V)at intervals of our chain link fence to keep the neighbors Lab from coming into our back yard when she was a puppy. She was pushing under to join our Basset and we knew it was a matter of time before he would follow her back out. Just hook the hook of the stake to the bottom of the chain link and hammer into the ground. You might have to use several between each section. We got our at Menards which is like a Home Depot or Lowes.
Good luck!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,244 Posts
When I was a kid I had 2 dogs that were escape artists. My family used electric fence. My dogs only had to run into it a few times before they learned to stay away from it. Then we didn't even have to turn it on.

~Heather
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
511 Posts
The electric fence is working great. In fact, I worked in the garden today, and I removed a section to drive my tractor in. They both did not want to cross the area where the fence was.
Dozer still stops to bark at it once in a while.

If you buy one, make sure it's for pets, and not for livestock/cattle.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
714 Posts
I like the idea of railroad ties aroung the bottom of the fence, that should work. I generally think they look good too. Much better than cinder blocks, for sure.
I don't have an electric fence, but I've heard mixed results with them. Apparently, some dogs think the brief shock is worth it to go adventuring.

Before I got Dudley I had to re-do my whole fence. It's split-rail with coated mesh wire stapled to the inside. I read somewhere (quite possibly here) what to do.

When putting up the new wire mesh, I first dug a trench about 6 inches deep along the entire fence line. Then when I was rolling out the new wire mesh and stapling it to the split rail, I had the bottom of the wire extended well below ground.

Even though I ended up with non-digging hounds I'm still glad I did it this way. If they had been diggers, it should have kept them in.
Since I now have a neglected/borderline mistreated Pit Bull next door, the fence serves to keep him out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
118 Posts
Deb, I'll bet this is easier than it seems. If you ask at your local home center, there is probably some type of spikes they sell specially made for holding a fence down. Or, try a fence company. They likely have something you can buy or get installed. Money well spent. Unfortunatley a wandering basset doesnt always make it home safely so a good fence is so important.

The pooping part had me cracking up!! Not sure what to tell ya there! :rolleyes:
Lisa
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top