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I'm a first time basset owner. Lucy is 6 months and I am absolutely in love with this baby dog. However, she is unlike any breed I've owned. First, the stereotype of hounds being lazy is just plain wrong! She does parkour all over my house! She's fast and can jump up on almost anything. She plays outside, has lots of toys and gets lots of attention. But have mercy, this is the most hyper dog I've ever had. Is this typical for the breed? It's like having a toddler again, seriously. And stubborn. An elephant may be stubborn, but Lucy has an immovable iron will. She cares not about pleasing me with her obedience. This concerns me because I'm afraid she will get hurt if she doesn't mind me. But... when she lays with me on the couch and I dig my fingers in that squishy skin while she licks my face...it just doesn't get any better. I'm hoping with maturity and patience these things will get better. Looking for some encouragement Signed, a tired dog mom

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typical of a basset puppy
 

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I'm a first time basset owner. Lucy is 6 months and I am absolutely in love with this baby dog. However, she is unlike any breed I've owned. First, the stereotype of hounds being lazy is just plain wrong! She does parkour all over my house! She's fast and can jump up on almost anything. She plays outside, has lots of toys and gets lots of attention. But have mercy, this is the most hyper dog I've ever had. Is this typical for the breed? It's like having a toddler again, seriously. And stubborn. An elephant may be stubborn, but Lucy has an immovable iron will. She cares not about pleasing me with her obedience. This concerns me because I'm afraid she will get hurt if she doesn't mind me. But... when she lays with me on the couch and I dig my fingers in that squishy skin while she licks my face...it just doesn't get any better. I'm hoping with maturity and patience these things will get better. Looking for some encouragement Signed, a tired dog mom

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I've gone through the same experience (and expectations, thought they were going to be low energy). Had no idea how active bassets are. I got a pair of basset brothers so they rumble with each other a lot (I was hoping they'd focus attention/energy on each other as opposed to one picking on a cat, well, cats can take care of themselves as it turns out). Still do to this day and they are almost 4 years old.

A neighbor of my parents have a basset who after talking with my folks revealed that it took about 7-8 years for his basset to get less hyper.

I was also naive enough to not realize how much of a hunting dog bassets are. I take them out to my cabin in WV on weekends (plenty of woods) and they will spend 5-6 hours at a time tracking/chasing rabbits. You can't keep them from running the woods. Their tails also are in severe wag mode when they are on a rabbit scent. A typical weekend will involve over 20 miles of tracks laid down by my boys. I stay at the cabin and watch them over a GPS tracking device.

Once the weekend is over, it takes them a couple days to get back to their usual bouncy energy level. Walking them around a block a couple times also helps a lot.

Best advice, walk your dog early and often!
 

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I've gone through the same experience (and expectations, thought they were going to be low energy). Had no idea how active bassets are. I got a pair of basset brothers so they rumble with each other a lot (I was hoping they'd focus attention/energy on each other as opposed to one picking on a cat, well, cats can take care of themselves as it turns out). Still do to this day and they are almost 4 years old.

A neighbor of my parents have a basset who after talking with my folks revealed that it took about 7-8 years for his basset to get less hyper.

I was also naive enough to not realize how much of a hunting dog bassets are. I take them out to my cabin in WV on weekends (plenty of woods) and they will spend 5-6 hours at a time tracking/chasing rabbits. You can't keep them from running the woods. Their tails also are in severe wag mode when they are on a rabbit scent. A typical weekend will involve over 20 miles of tracks laid down by my boys. I stay at the cabin and watch them over a GPS tracking device.

Once the weekend is over, it takes them a couple days to get back to their usual bouncy energy level. Walking them around a block a couple times also helps a lot.

Best advice, walk your dog early and often!
Thanks so much for sharing. I believe you are right, I underestimated the power of that hunting instinct. She is happiest outside tracking for sure. Well except for eating! So, do your boys come back on their own? I'd be afraid Lucy wouldn't on her own. We thought about taking her brother too, but we're afraid it would be too much potty training two. Now I think she'd love a playmate because our older dog wants nothing to do with her.

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IMHO raising littermates together is a mistake the bond too much to each other and not others including humans in the household unless you spend a lot of time doing things individually with the dogs.

about wandering off, If you are actively engages with them they stick around. if not they are gone. and chasing an animal it depends on the animal, rabbits circle deer on the other hand run straight for miles. You Might want to check out the AHBA world hunt video I recently posted in the performance forum

http://www.basset.net/boards/basset-hound-performance-events/53921-ahba-world-hunt-video-go-pro.html
 

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Thanks so much for sharing. I believe you are right, I underestimated the power of that hunting instinct. She is happiest outside tracking for sure. Well except for eating! So, do your boys come back on their own? I'd be afraid Lucy wouldn't on her own. We thought about taking her brother too, but we're afraid it would be too much potty training two. Now I think she'd love a playmate because our older dog wants nothing to do with her.

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Their noses have gotten them lost before. I believe they follow a trail until some point they lift their heads and have no idea where they are. One made it back in 12 hours, the other over 24 hours. Scared the hell out of me, I thought I lost at least one of them.

After that, I bought the Astro 320 GPS tracking system. They've gotten lost again after that incident, but this time I knew where they were and were able to go retrieve them. I have a rather long story of climbing a steep hill in the woods for 500ft vertical at 2am to get them. They were ecstatic to see me. Until 1/3 of the way back to the car, they caught a rabbit scent and ran off. I gave up for the night since they still showed up on my gps unit, got them the next morning at around 9am, they were sitting on the side of a road (all dirt roads in my weekend area) waiting to be rescued (about a mile and a half away).

Now - they know the woods quite well. They haven't gotten lost in probably well over a year, but I still keep the GPS trackers on them. I like knowing where they are and can tally up how many miles they've run in a weekend (often over 20 miles). Downside is the system is expensive, and the boys are rough on equipment. I've had to replace the collar units three times to date, and they cost $250 each (receiver unit extra too).

Oh, and the thing I'm most sorry about (then again, I didn't know how energetic bassets were), we had a 16 year old black lab when we got them. She didn't want anything to do with the bassets, and got upset when the bassets were play fighting with each other (she would walk in the middle of the battle to break them up, she didn't get that they were just rough housing). Bassets adored the old dog, but she just didn't have the energy or patience to deal with them and the lab ended up with a lot more hassle then she deserved during her final year on this planet. If I had gotten just one puppy though, all of the attention would have been turned on the older dog and that would have gone worse.
 

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IMHO raising littermates together is a mistake the bond too much to each other and not others including humans in the household unless you spend a lot of time doing things individually with the dogs.

about wandering off, If you are actively engages with them they stick around. if not they are gone. and chasing an animal it depends on the animal, rabbits circle deer on the other hand run straight for miles.
None of this rings true with me. I have a pair of brothers, and yes, they are definitely bonded. They keep together when running in the woods and play with each other. Great way for bassets to expend energy - on each other. They play rough and I'd rather have that heavy energy land on each other.

When I'm home, I always have at least one dog on the couch snuggled up against me. Last night, one in my lap, the other snuggled up against me. They usually fall asleep on me and it's difficult to get up with a 60lb weight in your lap.

When I dog sit another dog, these guys play with the other dog. They gang up on that dog, but that dog takes it in stride.

I also disagree with if you actively engage they will stick with you. I've tried that. First wiff of a rabbit trail and their attention on you plummets to 0%. Their hunting instinct kicks in and they are off.

Oh, and too bad this site makes it difficult to post images, I'd love to show the GPS map of the tracks they've laid down. There isn't a straight line anywhere on it unless they happen to be coming home and come down the dirt road. Rabbits don't run straight, so my bassets don't run straight.

I know all dogs have different personalities/traits, my experience with my bassets differs from your post. Might have to do with the environment, at a city townhouse during the week and WV cabin on weekends.
 

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"She cares not about pleasing me with her obedience. "


absolutely I always laugh at trainers that say a dog should work to please you. Obviously they are not going to be able to train a whole lot of breeds with that attitude.

see"https://suzanneclothier.com/article/hard-to-train/"

if you change your approach and pay the dog for work, Training a basset hounds is relatively easy.

10 year old basset hound

2. yeAR OLD BASSET
 

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Their noses have gotten them lost before. I believe they follow a trail until some point they lift their heads and have no idea where they are. One made it back in 12 hours, the other over 24 hours. Scared the hell out of me, I thought I lost at least one of them.

After that, I bought the Astro 320 GPS tracking system. They've gotten lost again after that incident, but this time I knew where they were and were able to go retrieve them. I have a rather long story of climbing a steep hill in the woods for 500ft vertical at 2am to get them. They were ecstatic to see me. Until 1/3 of the way back to the car, they caught a rabbit scent and ran off. I gave up for the night since they still showed up on my gps unit, got them the next morning at around 9am, they were sitting on the side of a road (all dirt roads in my weekend area) waiting to be rescued (about a mile and a half away).

Now - they know the woods quite well. They haven't gotten lost in probably well over a year, but I still keep the GPS trackers on them. I like knowing where they are and can tally up how many miles they've run in a weekend (often over 20 miles). Downside is the system is expensive, and the boys are rough on equipment. I've had to replace the collar units three times to date, and they cost $250 each (receiver unit extra too).

Oh, and the thing I'm most sorry about (then again, I didn't know how energetic bassets were), we had a 16 year old black lab when we got them. She didn't want anything to do with the bassets, and got upset when the bassets were play fighting with each other (she would walk in the middle of the battle to break them up, she didn't get that they were just rough housing). Bassets adored the old dog, but she just didn't have the energy or patience to deal with them and the lab ended up with a lot more hassle then she deserved during her final year on this planet. If I had gotten just one puppy though, all of the attention would have been turned on the older dog and that would have gone worse.
We had a 15 year old greyhound that died a week after we got the basset, and she followed her everywhere nipping and barking. I felt bad too that she didn't have much peace that last week of her life. Also have a Shih-Pom she's a grouchy 6 year old and refuses to make friends with the basset. Quite a story about you going to rescue them, the things we do for our dogs! Going to look into some GPS options and maybe we can let her loose a bit more.

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"She cares not about pleasing me with her obedience. "


absolutely I always laugh at trainers that say a dog should work to please you. Obviously they are not going to be able to train a whole lot of breeds with that attitude.

see"https://suzanneclothier.com/article/hard-to-train/"

if you change your approach and pay the dog for work, Training a basset hounds is relatively easy.

10 year old basset hound
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N_u-zWEJY8Q&t=11s

2. yeAR OLD BASSET
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R91dNFscUDA&index=12&list=UUqQstZ3glHEG6JfGSCrnPdA
I agree food is the currency she understands! We've done good with basic commands, but stop or come here sheesh forget it She looks at me like nah I'm not feelin it.

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I agree food is the currency she understands! We've done good with basic commands, but stop or come here sheesh forget it She looks at me like nah I'm not feelin it.

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My boys are bad when it comes to seeing other dogs. They act atrociously, barking and straining at the leash.

So, I kept a pocket full of dog treats. Each time they acted that way, I called to them and when I finally got their attention, gave them a treat. Sounded pretty counter-intuitive to me, but worth a shot.

It took a while, each time I'd eventually got their attention during an episode and fed them a treat. Now, when one of my bassets (Cletus) sees a dog, he comes up to me for a treat about half the time (right away, no barking), the other half of the time he responds to "come here" and then gets his treat. The result is he is no longer acting atrociously with other dogs around and he's getting more to the point of not barking, but coming up to me slobbering for some treat.

The other basset (Buford) - he's no longer interested in the treats I bought, he'd rather act aggressive and bark at the other dog. I have to try a new treat for him. It started working at first, but after a while he actually shrugged off the treat.
 

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Quite a story about you going to rescue them, the things we do for our dogs! Going to look into some GPS options and maybe we can let her loose a bit more.

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The story is a long one, one that started around 10pm. By the time I got to them around 2am and they ran off on me, that was the point where I said screw it and called it a night.

I researched options like attaching cell phones to harnesses, other GPS options, etc. I live pretty remotely so not much signal, didn't want to pay for two cell phone bills a month, etc. I also didn't want to end up paying for a cheap unit that worked like crap. Complete setup set me back $900 up front. But, it works well, even with all the hills and trees (advertised range 9 miles, but they admit flat surface no foliage). I've seen it work as far as a couple miles (they don't go that far away anymore) and I still have dead zone around 250 yards away.

Got more stories about the unit that would take some time to tell.

Oh, they also sell collars with Geo-fencing, so not only does it track where the dog is, it'll beep and shock the dog if they get into an area you don't want them in (say, near a major highway, or in my case, a neighbor's yard who happened to have chickens. Yeah, there was a sad chicken incident with my buttheads).
 

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The story is a long one, one that started around 10pm. By the time I got to them around 2am and they ran off on me, that was the point where I said screw it and called it a night.

I researched options like attaching cell phones to harnesses, other GPS options, etc. I live pretty remotely so not much signal, didn't want to pay for two cell phone bills a month, etc. I also didn't want to end up paying for a cheap unit that worked like crap. Complete setup set me back $900 up front. But, it works well, even with all the hills and trees (advertised range 9 miles, but they admit flat surface no foliage). I've seen it work as far as a couple miles (they don't go that far away anymore) and I still have dead zone around 250 yards away.

Got more stories about the unit that would take some time to tell.

Oh, they also sell collars with Geo-fencing, so not only does it track where the dog is, it'll beep and shock the dog if they get into an area you don't want them in (say, near a major highway, or in my case, a neighbor's yard who happened to have chickens. Yeah, there was a sad chicken incident with my buttheads).
Ted your stories are killing me . The geo fencing I'm interested in. I'll look around the internet. Buford and Cletus I love it. They sound like quite a pair!

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". I've tried that. First wiff of a rabbit trail and their attention on you plummets to 0%. "

aS IT IS SUPPOSE to be rabbits circles they are never that far away and should be easy to follow because they are supposed to be opening when running. and they comeback after running if you are engaged with them.



Split chasing rabbit and coming back together








Example of how hard we find it to get dogs back after running a rabbit
https://www.facebook.com/Mtefts/videos/1846592562052662/?t=25


You would be hard press not to be able to follow a basset on rabbit. If however they are running deer or fox which is illegal in most state, you have an issue because they run straight and for miles which I mentioned clearly above. We have astro 320 with d50 collar as well for un-enclosed areas when running rabbit but not because of rabbit but because they are not fully trash broke ie running deer or other off game.

" I have a pair of brothers, and yes, they are definitely bonded"
rest my case. We have group of adult consisting of 3 different sets of sisters and it is very clicky with the sister more bonded to each other than the other even though they are all raised together and a conscious effort was made to spit the sibling up and combine and integrate them individually with the other dogs. Raising littermates creates problems that can easily be avoided. If considering littermates Two dogs of nearly the same age different litters is a far superior choice. When we have puppies we will not sell littermates together to same owner.

Actual If you only had I dog not two it would have learned to play at a level acceptable to the lab. By having two especial this was not required by either and they just don't learn the samed dog v dog skills as they would have if not kept together. hence the reason I mentioned before very hard to impossible to have a cohesive integration of dogs when there are littermates in the group.
 

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Just to butt in here - as breeders, we usually ran on at least 2 from our occasional litters (only done for the next generation) and have had NO problems getting them to listen to 'she who must be listened to' or else :D . However with novice owners, it's not normally a good idea to sell to litter-mates to the same new owner, simply because they normally don't realise quite what they are taking on!

Further, I had a friend with two litter brothers and they were a nightmare when at home. Out on their exercise, they worked brilliantly as a pair, but not so at home when if one sat up, the other was up on his feet growling and snarling. And it wasn't always the same one either. For that reason I was leary of ever considering keeping two males of the same age, let alone brothers. Fwiw.
 

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Just to butt in here - as breeders, we usually ran on at least 2 from our occasional litters (only done for the next generation) and have had NO problems getting them to listen to 'she who must be listened to' or else :D . However with novice owners, it's not normally a good idea to sell to litter-mates to the same new owner, simply because they normally don't realise quite what they are taking on!

Further, I had a friend with two litter brothers and they were a nightmare when at home. Out on their exercise, they worked brilliantly as a pair, but not so at home when if one sat up, the other was up on his feet growling and snarling. And it wasn't always the same one either. For that reason I was leary of ever considering keeping two males of the same age, let alone brothers. Fwiw.
FranksMum, were they just obedient by nature or how did you train them? I am pretty concerned that she would be heading towards a dangerous situation and not stop when told. She will sometimes come when I say "treat", that's how I'm working it with her right now.

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FranksMum, were they just obedient by nature or how did you train them?
Obedient by nature? - heck no :D:eek: . BUT I have to say once there were numbers, with oldies who were pretty obedient (if you can use that word coupled with a Basset and not a Border Collie!) the youngsters tended to stick with them and maybe pick up as much training from them as from me as individuals. I did have to take them to Ringcraft and of course there was some degree of training needed. Eg. the time, towards the end of a walk, they were trotting along with me when suddenly a herd of deer jumped out of a ditch (I'd not seen them), pretty much in front of us. I managed to stop all but our singleton bitch, by then 9 months, who took off after them like a bat out of hell. Baying her head off. She was NOT for stopping. I took the others home, leaving hubby to follow in the direction she gone - she was at least 3 fields over by then. On the way back the local gamekeeper drove by and I flagged him down to let him know we had a loose one. He wasn't unknown to take a pop at loose dogs if they got near his chick pens (pheasants). He said he had nothing out in that direction, no traps. Heck, I'd not considered that! End of the story, by the time I'd put the others home and set off to help in the search, my husband was coming down the lane with Canuck on a lead, grinning from ear to ear and still sound. Hells bells - running like that at 9 months!!! After that she was on a lead for a few months before I let her off, bringing her back to me and letting her go again (so she didn't see coming back as automatically 'going on the lead'). Eventually she was safe to let off.

So no, no automatic obedience. Mine had to be corrected early days.
 

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Obedient by nature? - heck no :D:eek: . BUT I have to say once there were numbers, with oldies who were pretty obedient (if you can use that word coupled with a Basset and not a Border Collie!) the youngsters tended to stick with them and maybe pick up as much training from them as from me as individuals. I did have to take them to Ringcraft and of course there was some degree of training needed. Eg. the time, towards the end of a walk, they were trotting along with me when suddenly a herd of deer jumped out of a ditch (I'd not seen them), pretty much in front of us. I managed to stop all but our singleton bitch, by then 9 months, who took off after them like a bat out of hell. Baying her head off. She was NOT for stopping. I took the others home, leading hubby to follow in the direction she gone - she was at least 3 fields over by then. On the way back the local gamekeeper drove by and I flagged him down to let him know we had a loose one. He wasn't unknown to take a pop at loose dogs if they got near his chick pens (pheasants). He said he had nothing out in that direction, no traps. Heck, I'd not considered that! End of the story, by the time I'd put the others home and set off to help in the search, my husband was coming down the lane with Canuck on a lead, grinning from ear to ear and still sound. Hells bells - running like that at 9 months!!! After that she was on a lead for a few months before I let her off, bringing her back to me and letting her go again (so she didn't see coming back as automatically 'going on the lead'). Eventually she was safe to let off.

So no, no automatic obedience. Mine had to be corrected early days.
glad that ended well! No way I would take Lucy out without a lead at this point. Hopefully it will come with time. Interesting breed are bassets! Hard not to love that spunky personality.

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We start working on their off lead Skill very early when they are little tike they will follow you where ever you go





 
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