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Hi. I just recently adopted a basset hound. This is the first time I have ever owned a basset. Max is generally a good dog. I really haven't had any problems. Except.....on walks. I live in a condo and I have plenty of yard it's just not fenced in. So for pottying we take small walks through the neighborhood. He really seems to enjoy it. But sometimes Max just stops. It doesnt matter where it is. He has even stopped in the middle of the road and won't budge. Cars have to go around him. It's not heavy or fast traffic,but dangerous for us both still. I take treats with me for praising good behavior,but now the treats are just a bribe to get out of the road or to get home. I have tried only staying in my yard area but he fights me on entering the grassy area and prefers to walk on the sidewalks. These aren't long walks it's really more like down the street. On a good day it takes us two minutes to walk it there and back. We use a harness instead of a collar hoping this would help the problem. And how am I to get him to move without hurting him? The neighbors look at me like I'm an animal abuser. I try pulling up on the leash and harness which brings his two front legs off the ground and his nails clawing the sidewalk or road. Since giving him treats to get him to go it has started happening more frequently. I don't know what to do. Does anyone have any tips or ideas of what to do?
Thanks
 

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Hello,

Welcome! So what you're experiencing is a phenomenon we like to call "flat basset". If you do a search on this forum you'll be relieve to see that many if not all of us have experienced a stubborn basset lying in the middle of the road. I know other folks have suggested no-pull harnesses in the past so if you do a search in this forum you should be able to find the post.

Good luck!
Arlene & Snoopy
 

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I take treats with me for praising good behavior,but now the treats are just a bribe to get out of the road or to get home. I have tried only staying in my yard area but he fights me on entering the grassy area and prefers to walk on the sidewalks. These aren't long walks it's really more like down the street. On a good day it takes us two minutes to walk it there and back. We use a harness instead of a collar hoping this would help the problem. And how am I to get him to move without hurting him?[/b]
A treat only becones a bribe if that is the way you chose to use it. Concentrate on using for good behavior. If the dog can go consitently for 2 minute the it time to have walks of a minute and 1/2 and avoid the behavior. Once this is happen then you can over time increase the length of the walks. Also work on a recall this is often the vest way to get the dog moving again. If the dog learns to associate "come" with good things it will get up and move withou you have to "bribe him" see

DEPOSITS INTO THE PERFECT RECALL ACCOUNT

DISTRACTIONS FOR YOUR RECALL

LIST OF REINFORCERS

Substrate preferrence can be a big problem in dogs. It is best to acclimate them to all kind of surface under their feet other wise the problem only gets worse when they are older.

A traditional harness actual was designed to cause the dog to pull harder not ussual what you want when training. I recomend a Sporn no pull harness for puppies because I think it is safer and more effective with puppies. I will admit however it work on the principal of causing pain to the dog when it pulls be it forging ahead or stoping dehind. If you have a problem with this then the Sensi-ble harness is another whay to go Ihave hear great thing but never used one. another approach is a head halter like a gental leader but I personally and not confortable using one on a puppy again because of the posible risk of injury.

Loose Leash Walking: The Total Picture

Targeting and Loose Leash Walking

Advice for Loose Leash Walking


Also keep in mind it takes two for a dog to pull on leash. you have the power to avoid it.

If you have not done so investigate puppy classesd there is nothing better than to have a hand on instructor to help you through the rough spots.,
 

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Since giving him treats to get him to go it has started happening more frequently[/b]
Let me quess, the only time the dog gets a treat is after it refused to move . Think about it ,you are rewarding the behavior you want to avoid. The solution is not to be so stingy with treats before the unwanted behavior occurs. The dog is walking nicely with you reach down or drop food to the dog. The secret is using food to rewarding the behavior you want not as a bride to get the behavior you want.

REWARDS, LURES & BRIBES'What is the difference between a reward, a lure and a bribe? Explanations & tips. "

Food On or Off the Body? Yes!
Another common error in using any form of positive reinforcement is using it as an interruption to undesirable behavior. Never interrupt undesirable behavior with positive reinforcement. Never interrupt undesirable behavior with positive reinforcement. YES, I am aware I repeated that statement. It's critical to remember the above.

I see many trainers/handlers jumping through all of the proverbial hoops rather than having their dogs do the jumping. Let me paint a scenario for you...[/b]
You Get What You Reinforce, Not What You (Necessarily) Want
Now, clicking a loose leash is not that complex, but, under the wrong circumstances, that is, in an environment full of distractions, the job could be made MUCH more complicated than it should. I must admit that I have never had to train a dog that has had a prolonged (years) and severe leash (lunging) problem, but I have trained a fair number of dogs to maintain a loose leash. I maximized my success by restricting the training environment and the options of the dog. I would not leave the restricted environment (say a barn first, then the company grounds, and then a meadow, etc.) until the behavior was very good. I would expand the environment and increase the behavioral criteria only when the dog's behavior said it was time.[/b]
SET YOUR DOG UP TO SUCCEED

WHAT ARE YOU PAYING ATTENTION TO?

SECRETS OF DOG TRAINING
REINFORCEMENT. Dogs do what works for them. They’re not all that different than humans in that regard. If your dog nudges your hand and you pet your dog, your dog will continue nudging your hand every time he wants attention. If your dog barks at you and you throw the ball, your dog will continue to bark at you to get you to throw the ball. In both of these examples, you have reinforced your dog’s behavior by responding just as your dog wanted you to. (And, just who is training who here?)

There are many things that can be reinforcers for your dog. Treats, petting, praise, attention, play, fetch, chasing squirrels, sniffing around on the ground, and so on. One nice thing about the “work” of dog training is that every moment you spend with your dog is a training opportunity. Your dog is constantly learning what you want and don’t want by what you reinforce. If you pay attention, you can much more quickly establish the behaviors you want and extinguish the behaviors you don’t want.[/b]

JUST REWARDS

Using Food in Training
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the tips. All the reading information is very useful as well. I will let you know how it goes.
 
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