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Hi everyone!! We are adopting a Basset puppy on 6/29/10... this will be our 1st basset and 1st indoor dog. I need help!!!! What food is best for a basset??? How do you house train them??? How often do you feed them??? any and all information will be greatly appreciated!!! Thanks!!!
 

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How do you house train them???
it is know different than any other dog however bassets are natorious slow in developing housetraining skill IMHO it is because they develope shincter control at a later date and have more accidents which dramatical hinders housetraining

see Housetraining Your Puppy

On tool many find effect in control and preventing accidents is a crate. This must be introduced in a way that is not upsetting to the pup

crate Training

The other often neglectic part of house training is training a signal for the dog to use to tell you it needs to go out that you will not ignore. The problem is most of the common signal dogs thing up on there own are intial ignored by the owner hence the dog will not use them again. So the dog and human never learn to comunicate this vital information. It is far easier to teach a signal to the dog then hope one happens magically

House Training: Ring My Bell!

One of the most common complaints is my puppy goes in the house right after coming in from outside, The answer for this is quite simple from the first housetraining link
Do not rely on a puppy to tell you when it's time to go out. That is expecting too much responsibility and communication at too early an age. It is up to you, the adult human, to know when he needs to go out. Watch his activity level and the clock.

A 12 wk puppy who is busy playing may need to urinate every 15-20 minutes, whereas a resting puppy might go for an hour, and a sleeping puppy can go 8 hours at night. Activity makes urine! Activity makes urine! Repeat this 10 times, slowly. This is a very important lesson for new puppy owners.
a similar problem is the puppy does not go when we take him out. This is often a learned behavior. Consider Puppy goes out does business and immeadiate comes in side,. For the dog that want to explore outside the soon learn they can extend their outside stay by sniff walking etc anything to avoid actually going to increase there outdoor time. The solution is to make the time you take them out to go specifical for that purpose. Go to one spot and remain there. No walking, play etc. Second reward the dog while going with food and praise, and with a walk, sniffing and normal outdoor activity after regardless of weather conditions, temp etc.
A variation on this theme Potty-Training Tip
 

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What food is best for a basset???
There is no one food that is best for a particular breed, it all comes down to what works for that dog. That said there are tendencies for lines to do better on some types of food than others that is were the breeders recommendation is most helpful. They will know what has and has not worked for their dogs. General it is a good idea to continue feed what the breeder has already started the dog on.


How often do you feed them???
How old. Young pups 3-4 times a day. From a Housetraining point of view it is best to feed a number of times that equals the number of bowel movements of the dog. That way the dog gets in the habit of eliminating after eating. This is part of the importance of a schedual in housetraing a schedule makes when the dog has to go predicable wich makes avoiding accidents possible. A the dog gets older The will start to skip meals I take this a s sign to reduce the number of feeding however I never feed less than twice a day. Smaller meals reduce the bloat potential of a dog. I also perfer a Large breed puppy food for puppies. It has reduce calcium and phosporus which is critcal to prevent bone growth/orthopeadic abnormailities. Contrary to what many thing Too much calcium causes bone growth problems far more often than too little, never suppliment with calcium, milk etc. For full grown adults I perfer a high protein/high fat diet It is not without risk but in active dogs there are numerous benefits, less injuries, better performance etc but again it is not ideal for evey dog.

The most inportant aspect of feed in not what but how much. The problem is there is no formula or rule of thumb on this. Because of the vastly different metabolic rates of individule dogs and the difference on caloric content of diffrent brands of food. there is a wide disparity in the amount one need to feed. The only way to do this is by judging the dog's/puppy's body condition. It is far better for a puppy to be a bit thin and a bit overweight. Also keep in mind that everyones image of a average basset is actual and overweight to obese dog.

see Dog Diet Do's and Don’t's
According to Dr. Tony Buffington, Professor of Clinical Nutrition, Ohio State University College of Veterinary Medicine, your puppy can be fed a regimen of specific caloric intake compared to his body condition score (BCS), using a simple one to five scale, from overly thin to obese. Using manufacturer feeding recommendations as an initial starting point, feed your puppy to a score of two and maintain this weight until he's fully grown. Feed whatever amount is necessary to maintain a BCS of two during the growth period, realizing that dogs have varying growth rates and activity levels. Once his adult stature is achieved, you may allow him to reach a score of three


2 = Thin - Ribs easily palpated and may be visible with no palpable fat. Tops of lumbar vertebrae visible. Pelvic bones less prominent. Obvious waist and abdominal tuck.
Body Condition Chart Puppy

understand Body Condition

Corpulent canine
People don't know how to determine the correct weight for their dogs. Dogs vary in height, bone structure, and muscularity, so there is no one correct weight for a dog of any given breed. The best way to determine whether a dog is overweight is to test 3 different parts of the body: the neck, the ribs, and the hips.


To check the neck, press your thumb and index finger deep into the side of the neck just ahead of the shoulder, and pinch them together. If your fingers are more than 1/2" apart, the dog is overweight. (Note: this is where old dogs tend to carry most of their excess fat, and they may actually be thin in other locations.)
To check the ribs, stand with your dog beside you, facing his butt. Place your thumb on the middle of his spine half way down the back and spread your fingers out over his last few ribs. Then run your fingers up and down along his skin. You should be able to feel the bumps of his ribs without pressing in.
To check the hips, run your hand over your dog's croup. You should be able to feel the bumps of his two pelvic bones without pressing down.


Some of you may be reading this and thinking, "I would never want my dog to be that skinny!" Think about the Olympic athletes. If you want your dog to be an athlete then it is only fair that you do what you can to help him achieve the body that he will need to perform and stay healthy and injury free for many years.
Also keep in mind even with all this information and a body chart in hand most owners of dogs underestimate how overweight there dog really is
Purina® Study Confirms Link Between Body Fat and Chronic Health Conditions
Other Purina research found that most owners couldn't accurately assess their dogs' body conditions. When owner and expert scores were compared, only 28 percent of owners characterized their pets as above ideal body condition, while 79 percent of the experts scored those same animals to be above ideal body condition.
 

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While the above questions are a good starting point they do not cover the most essential areas in creating a puppy that is easy to live with. This first requires that a puppy/dog is not going to do harm and secondly is well adjusted to living with humans and other animals.

For the first teaching bite Inhibition is essential
Bite Inhibition- How to teach it
Rather than "No bite," I strongly, strongly, strongly urge you to teach your puppy bite inhibition instead. Bite inhibition is a "soft mouth." It teaches the pup how to use his mouth gently. Does this mean that the pup will forever be mouthing you? No, not at all. Actually, regardless of the method used, puppies generally grow out of mouthing behavior after a few months.

So why should you teach bite inhibition? Because dogs have one defense: their teeth. Every dog can bite. If frightened enough or in pain or threatened, your dog *will* bite. That doesn't in any way make him a "bad" dog. It makes him a dog. It's your responsibility, therefore, to teach your dog that human skin is incredibly fragile. If you teach your dog bite inhibition that training will carry over even if he is later in a position where he feels forced to bite.
A story... Ian Dunbar tells a story of a bite incident he had to asses. A Golden Retriever therapy dog was leaving a nursing home and his tail was accidentally shut in a car door. The owner went to help, and the dog delivered four Level Four bites before she could react.

FYI, a standard scale has been developed to judge the severity of dog bites, based on damage inflicted. The scale is

...* Level Four: Single bite, deep puncture (up to one and a half times the depth of a single canine tooth), wound goes black within 24 hours.
* Level Five: Multiple bite attack or multiple attack incidents

Technically, the woman received a Level Five bite from a long-time therapy dog. Dr. Dunbar wasn't the least bit surprised by the bites. I mean, the dog got his tail shut in a car door! Of course he bit! What shocked Dr. DUnbar was that a dog with no bite inhibition was being used as a therapy dog.

"But he's never bitten before." Of course not. And barring an accident like that, he probably never would have. But an accident is just that. An accident. Unpredicted. What if it had happened in the nursing home?

The other critical aspect is habituation and socialization

Countdown to a Crackerjack Canine Companion

Puppy Socialisation and Habituation (Part 1) Why is it Necessary?

Puppy Socialisation and Habituation (Part 2) How to go about it

Position Paper on Puppy Socialization By American Society of Animal Behaviorist.
For this reason, the American Veterinary Society of Animal Behavior believes that it should be the standard of care for puppies to receive such socialization before they are fully vaccinated. Because the first three months are the period when sociability
outweighs fear, this is the primary window of opportunity for puppies to adapt to new people, animals, and experiences. Incomplete or improper socialization during this important time can increase the risk of behavioral problems later in life including fear, avoidance, and/or aggression. Behavioral problems are the greatest threat to the owner-dog bond. In fact, behavioral problems are the number one cause of relinquishment
to shelters.3 Behavioral issues, not infectious diseases, are the number one cause of death for dogs under three years of age.
 

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congrats on your new addition! you're going to have a wonderful time with your basset baby! lol all i have to say about my 6 month old basset is...he's lucky he's so cute because that's the only thing getting me through this first year.
 

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Welcome to the "family"! Get ready to ride the Basset roller coaster! This is the first basset we have owned, and it certainly is not the last (still trying to convince the hubby to get a "friend" for Snickers!) They are an amazing breed, and be prepared for tons of attention from others! Also get ready for lots of love, and frustration (sounds silly in the same sentence I know....)and most importantly don't lose your patience (believe me, been to the brink MANY times!)
Enjoy your new "furbaby"! Be sure to post some pics as well!
 

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Yay a basset baby! Not sure if my experience with a young pup was typical, but man-oh-man...I can't even tell you how many sleepless nights I had LOL. My biggest problem was that I didn't do any research prior to bringing home my baby dog. So you are starting out right IMO! Ask questions, talk to people, and be prepared to have the best friend ever!
 

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Personally, I think crate training is the way to go. It is working out so well for us! Bassets take longer to housebreak so be prepared. I also do the confining to one room in the house. She is doing great so I am starting to extend her "area" to two rooms. Good Luck, I can't wait to see pictures! Any ideas on names?
 

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I agree with the crate training. It worked for Lollypop very well. Now, when she is not on the couch, she has a place to go to feel safe, and she LIKES to go to bed there too!. As for house training, be very patient and very pro active. Lollypop was going almost every half hour or more for the first 3 months. It took her probably 3 months with us (5 months old) before she began letting us know when she had to go.

Make sure you clean the ears every week too!

You will love the hound! As stated before, they are VERY irritating sometimes because they are stubborn. Still, the amount of reciprocal affection is so rife it more than makes up for any frustration(s)l. I usually wind up laughing about whatever it is that frustrates me, sometimes one's only alternative

Of course, lots of ear and belly rubs!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
We are naming her Ruby!! As soon as we get her I will post pictures!!!!! Thanks for the advice!! I have been doing alot of research, but I am sure I will have lots more questions when we actually get her!!!:D
 
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