Basset Hounds Forum banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi everyone! Sorry for the long first post, but here it goes: My wife and I adopted a 2yr old male basset this past Saturday. He has a rather lengthy history for such a young dog. We believe he came from a breader as he appears to be a purebread. He had come from an owner that couldn't afford to feed him, rescued and adopted to a family but was given immediately back because he growled at the father of the new owners, put in a foster home for 2 days and then we adopted him. He was very skinny when they rescued him, but they were able to get him to gain weight and now is only a couple lbs underweight.

My wife who rescued a basset in the past had been wanting to adopt one forever, and we just fell inlove with him. We walked him around with no issues, took him to her fathers house on the way home, seemed very friendly and well behaved.

We took him home, very well behaved, no complaints. However we made the mistake of inviting friends over that night, and there were three guys over 6'-0" and 225lbs over the house, and we all entered the room at the same time while he was sitting on my wife's lap. He started growling and continued until we left the room. I was worried about this, but kept my distance and didn't go near him until everyone else had gone home and he was fine and greeted me with a wagging tail and fell asleep on my lap.

The next day I tried to introduce him to my brother and he started loudly growling and barking at him. He wouldn't calm down until my brother left. Since then he has also growled at strangers, including my aunt, while out for a walk. I assume he is just being protective of us, and I don't want him to correct him right away as he is probably still getting used to our house, but is there anyway to correct this behavior ourselves or through a trainer?

Also P.S. my wife's cousins family, including their 1 yr old daughter and 2 yr old Alaskan Malamute and he had no issues with them. In fact he loved playing with the baby and dog.

Once again sorry for the long post. Thank you so much if you managed to read it all!!


Sent from my iPhone using PG Free
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,903 Posts
I assume he is just being protective of us
that would be an incorrect assumption. The problem is the dog was not porperly socialized as a pup to adult humans. I have such a dog though it has more of a problem with females than Males. Also she did not growl but rather bit first because as we learned she was punished for growling. The punishment was quite effect she no longer growled but it did not change her underlying emotional state which cause the growling. You are wise not to punishes the behavior. While it can work occassional the fall out from such an approach is often worse than the problem. To some extent you are alway going to have this problem with this dog and stranger. force new people on the dog is only going to exacerbate the situation. You can work on overcomeing such fears by changing the assoiciations the dog has with strangers, The is when strangers are around I get good things. but this must be done at a threashold distance in which the dog is not anxious, growling etc or instead of greating a new association you end up rewarding the unwanted behavior of growling etc. her are some links and refference material to get you started but seeking the help and advice of a profession than can acutual observeb the behavior is never a bad idea.

Puppy Socialisation and Habituation (Part 1) Why is it Necessary
One in five of the dogs that Dr Valerie O’Farrell (1986) studied while conducting research at Edinburgh (Royal Dick) University Veterinary School had a behavioural problem to a lesser or greater extent. A similar, but larger, American study fixed the figure at one in four. In one year my practice treated 773 dogs - 79 of them, that’s 10 percent, had problems of fearfulness towards people or the environment due to a lack of early socialisation or habituation and a further 4.5. percent were inept at relating to other dogs, again due to a lack of early socialisation. The problem is immeasurably greater than these figures suggest.


AVSAB Position Statement
The Use of Punishment for Behavior Modification in Animals

 
AVSAB’s position is that punishment1 (e.g. choke chains, pinch collars, and electronic
collars) should not be used as a first-line or early-use treatment for behavior problems. This is due to the potential adverse effects which include but are not limited to: inhibition of learning, increased fear-related and aggressive behaviors, and injury to animals and people interacting with animals

...
Punishment can suppress aggressive and fearful behavior when used effectively, but it may not change the underlying cause of the behavior. For instance, if the animal behaves aggressively due to fear, then the use of force to stop the fearful reactions will make the animal more fearful while at the same time suppressing or masking the outward signs of fear; (e.g., a threat display/growling). As a result, if the animal faces a situation where it is extremely fearful, it may suddenly act with heightened aggression and with fewer warning signs. In other words, it may now attack more aggressively or with no warning, making it much more dangerous.

...

Adverse Effects of Punishment
...

ishment cancausesomeindividualstobecomeextremelyfearful, andthisfearcangeneralizetoothercontexts. Some punishments may not cause physical harm and may not seem severe, but they can cause the animal to become fearful, and this fear may generalize to other contexts. For instance, some dogs on which the citronella or electronic collar are used with a preceding tone may react fearfully to alarm clocks, smoke detectors, or egg timers.
6. Punishment canfacilitateorevencauseaggressivebehavior. Punishment has been shown to increase the likelihood of aggressive behavior in many species. Animals in which the punishment does not immediately suppress the behavior may escalate in their efforts to avoid the punishment to the point where they become aggressive. Those who already show aggressive behavior may exhibit more intense and injurious aggressive behaviors.
7. Punishment cansuppressbehaviors, includingthosebehaviorsthat warnthat abitemayoccur. When used effectively, punishment can suppress the behavior of fearful or aggressive animals, but it may not change the association underlying the behavior. Thus, it may not address the underlying problem. For instance, if the animal is aggressive due to fear, then the use of force to stop the fearful reactions will make the dog more fearful while at the same time suppressing or masking the outward signs of fear. Once it can no longer suppress its fear, the animal may suddenly act with heightened aggression and with fewer warning signs of impending aggression. In other words, it may now attack with no warning.
8. Punishment canleadtoabadassociation. Regardless of the strength of the punishment, punishment can cause animals to develop a negative association with the person implementing it or the environment in which the punishment is used. For instance, when punishment is used for training dogs to come when called, the dogs may learn to come at a trot or walk (or cower while approaching) rather than returning to the owners at a fast run as if they enjoy returning to their owners. Or when punishment is used during obedience competition training or agility training for competitions, dogs may perform the exercises with lack of enthusiasm. This negative association is particularly clear when the dog immediately becomes energetic once the exercise is over and it is allowed to play. Pets are not the only ones who can develop a negative association from this process. Owners may develop a negative association, too. When owners use punishment, they are often angry, thus the expression of force is reinforcing to them because it temporarily decreases their anger. They may develop a habit of frequently becoming angry with their pet because it "misbehaves" in spite of their punishment. This may damage the bond with their pet.

CAUTIOUS CANINE - HOW TO HELP DOGS CONQUER THEIR FEARS, 2ND EDITION


CLICK TO CALM - HEALING THE AGGRESSIVE DOG

Desensitization & Counter Conditioning

Understanding Calming Signals in Dogs

ON TALKING TERMS WITH DOGS - CALMING SIGNALS, 2ND EDITION
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
792 Posts
Congratulation Francis's on your new addtion - I love my rescue Lucy - I hope to always have one as part of our family. Can't wait for photos!

Jen~
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top