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Discussion Starter #1
We haven't posted in a while but, I'm in need of advice. We think one of our bassets had a siezure tonight. She made a noise between a howl and cry of pain. My husband went down stairs to see what was wrong and found her convusling on the chair. Her legs were going like she was struggling to get up and struggling to breathe. He put her on the floor and checked to she if she was choaking. He kept his fingers in her mouth and after a minute she swallowed hard and started breathing normal ( a little fast but steady). It took her a minute and she blinked and started to wag her tail. She is a little restless now but ok. We are taking her to the vet in the morning unless she does it again. Has this happened to anyone else? We are very scared and trying not to think the worst. Can anyone help?
 

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I had one do that once, midnight on a public holiday, I did get the vet then and there. He had bllods done, all was OK and he never did it again....no idea what it was
 

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Her legs were going like she was struggling to get up and struggling to breathe. He put her on the floor and checked to she if she was choaking. He kept his fingers in her mouth and after a minute she swallowed hard and started breathing normal ( a little fast but steady). It took her a minute and she blinked and started to wag her tail.[/b]
First it is a very bad idea to put you fingers in the mouth of a siezing dog. 1 the do not and will not swollow their tugues. A siezure cause muscle to contract. If the muscle of the jaw were to contract it could induce very serious injury to the hand.

I will not say its common but a single siezure episode is not a big deal. repeated siezure even over a long time span are. But their are a number of anticonvulsants that often are very effective at controling siezure in dogs if it becomes necessary. Their are certain medical condition that can lead to siezures on of the more common one in older dogs hypothyroidism. A toxin is another posible cause of a single siezure
Substances that cause Seizures
 

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Murray had one seizure about a year ago, and has never had another. I hope this is a once and done situation for you too! Please let us know how it goes-
 

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Gibbs did this to us a bit ago (I guess it was during my Christmas break). We took him to the vet and they ran all kinds of tests and found NOTHING! The vet said that she too had a dog that used to do it without any tests showing the cause. Hopefully this will be a one time thing for yours too. I have to mirror Mikey T when I say that you should not put your hands in the mouth (unless you're willing to loose a few fingers). Just like when humans seizure the best thing you can do is move things away from them so as they will not hurt themselves during the seizure. They will work themselves out of it, though I know it is very scary to watch. I grew up with a kid that had seizures daily so I know how hard it is to watch and do nothing. I totally brokedown and freaked out when Gibbs did it. Good luck in finding out whats going on, and keep us posted.

~Heather
 

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Update - Zoey did it again late last night and we took her to the emergency vet. They said she did have siezures and went though the many causes. They are running some blood and kept her overnight just in case she did it again. We are taking her to the regular vet this morning -if we can get in. We will keep you posted. Thank you for your advise.
 

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Lots of drool for Zoey! I hope they find the cause and get her treated/regulated ASAP.
 

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Sending lots healing drool for Zoey. I hope they will quickly find the cause of the seizures, and she'll be back to normal very soon. Do keep us posted.
 

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Another Update- She hasn't had any more siezures so far and the Dr. has given us meds to control the siezures. The first panel of blood work came back fine but the next panel is indicating that there is some sort if infection. She had been making a retching sound when she would get up from her naps (she stopped doing it after the first seizure) and the DR. said one of her tonsals was inflamed. We are still waiting for the Valley Fever and Tick Fever results to come back. The Dr. prescribed some strong but general antibiotcs to start her on until we find out. I have mixed feelings about the results so far. On one hand I am happy that we are finding that it is an infection because we can treat it and resolve it. On the other hand I'm afraid we won't find out what is causing it and she will have to be on the meds for good. I just want her to be happy and healthy. Thank you all for your support. I'll keep you posted.
 

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One of the potential adverse reactions to vaccinations is seizures -- has your dog recently been vaccinated?

Significant calcium deficiency can cause seizure-like episodes, have you had a blood test to check calcium and phosphorous levels? High phosphorous foods (meat, eggs, nuts) bind with calcium, as do high oxalate foods (oatmeal) and may deplete your dog's levels to a point where it will cause problems. Poison will also cause seizures.

You might want to do an online search for "canine hypocalcemia" or just "hypocalcemia". This link http://www.lowchensaustralia.com/breeding/eclampsia.htm will take you to an article on this subject in which it states that the signs of low calcium levels (hyocalcemia) are: "Muscle tremors, restlessness, panting, incoordination, grand mal seizures and fever as high as 106."

Further, the above articles thats a one of the possible causes: Poor Nutrition - "Home brewed" diets usually are at fault. The owner innocently may be adding too much unbalanced meat to the bitch's diet, thinking the extra protein is beneficial. What's really happening is the calcium to phosphorus ratio is out of balance because the amount of useful calcium in the food is actually reduced! The ideal contains a ratio of calcium to phosphorus of 1.2 to 1. (Many organ meats such as liver have a ratio of calcium to phosphorus of 1 to 15!! Liver is great for dogs but if it comprises a large part of the diet, the calcium/phosphorus ratio of the diet will be improper.)

If you have chickens, you should be aware that their droppings are extremely high in phosphorous and can cause a problem if your dog eats too many of them. If the droppings are charging your dog's blood with phosphorous, it's going to drain him/her of calcium in order to maintain proper pH balance and cause muscle twitching, etc...

Check this link HPA | Phosphorous | FAQs on phosphorous from the Health Protection Agency, especially this quote: "It has been used as a rat and rodent poison.."

Check this site Eclampsia (Puerperal Tetany, Milk Fever, Hypocalcemia) in Dogs "Eclampsia, also called milk fever or puerperal tetany, is an acute, life-threatening disease caused by low blood calcium levels (hypocalcemia) in dogs ...."

One of our dogs developed severe seizures after the second of his puppy rabies shots -- his head shook so hard we thought his eyes would pop out, it was terrifying. After this seizure activity triggered by the vaccine, he became prone to them from other triggers. Whenever he ate too many high phosphorous foods (or chicken droppings), he would seize. Giving him 1/2 a quart of plain organic yogurt would calm his seizures within 15 minutes, when they were food-related.

Personally, I would have a complete blood count done to check for mineral levels if you don't think vaccines or something your dog is eating is causing the seizures. PLUS, I would consult a Homeopathic/Holistic veterinarian for an alternative treatment.

Kris L. Christine
Founder, Co-Trustee
THE RABIES CHALLENGE FUND

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The 2003 American Animal Hospital Association's Canine Vaccine Guidelines are accessible online at http://www.leerburg.com/special_report.htm .

The 2006 American Animal Hospital Association's Canine Vaccine Guidelines are downloadable in PDF format at http://www.aahanet.org/PublicDocumen...s06Revised.pdf .
 
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