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Dexter is 3.5 years old and it seems like that is all he does anymore! It's over the simplest of things too -- things he knows will happen and that he doesn't need to whine for.

1) Every morning when my alarm goes off, the 5 minutes it takes me to turn the alarm off and put on some clothes, he's whining.

2) Every day when I get home until I take him out for a walk, he's whining (and he doesn't have to use the bathroom -- he gets taken out a few times during the day).

3) If I put food in his bowl then start filling his water bowl up, he'll whine until I'm done.


I'm at my wit's end with it. What can be done? I've tried using the "QUIET" command, I've even just stopped everything I'm doing when he starts whining to see if he picks up that it doesn't get him what he wants -- but neither has worked.

Any suggestions? The whining just makes me not want to do the things that I was going to do!
 

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He's just excited and that's his way of saying so. All those activities are high points in his doggy day. Try to think of it as him talking to you and saying, "Yippee! You're getting up (or we're going for a walk, or you're giving me FOOD!!!)" He's not doing it to be a bad dog or whining the way a kid does, to be petulant.
 
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I finally came to that conclusion with Belvedere ...it's his way of being excited. He doesn't whine for food when we're eating and he doesn't do it to get us to do something. It's only after we start. He's impatient and anxious to get moving.

Some of these things we just can't control.
 

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Yep, I've got a whiner too. And yes, it can get very aggrivating but it is just what he does, like the others have said, when he is happy/excited. Sometimes, particularly in the morning, the only option I have is to put him in a room on his own while I get ready/wake up. No, he's not happy and I don't particularly like doing it, but sometimes it just has to be or the whining will, frankly, drive me mad and I rather do love the little chap.
 
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I got one too! I guess I don't hear Maggie whine that much because I'm so used to noise with a 4 yr old and almost 2yr kids. But when I do notice it is when we are eatting dinner. Our dogs aren't allowed in the kitchen when we eat(otherwise my children wouldn't eat due to sharing) so they sit at the kitchen opening. I guess she is mad so she whines the whole time. And it will test your patience, I know. And she'll whine when she needs out or water or food. Or sometimes I think to make sure her squeaker(the nick name for the whinning) works.

My best advice is just learn to tune it out. After 6.5 years with Maggie I'm learning to do it. But some days it is harder than others. Good luck and if you find anything that works let me know...
 

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Guess I'm not alone.

The whining when they need to go out is perfectly understandable and I don't mind it at all -- even though we have set times throughout the day, if you gotta go you gotta go.

It's the whining when I know he's just doing it because he thinks it will get me to do one thing or another. The morning thing is the most frustrating because it's not even him whining to go to the bathroom -- its him whining just to bet let out of my room (I wake up, brush my teeth, let the dog into the living room, shower, then let him out). He's already whining by the time I'm walking to the bathroom to brush my teeth.
 
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It is my understanding the Bassets are generally pretty vocal dogs, my Copper is both whiney and barky. I dont mind the whining at all in fact I am beginning to teach him to make some sounds that resemble words. He whines when I am feeding him or when he knows its time for a walk. I can understand how it kind of stresses you out, I can say for me, that I love Copper so much that the whining sometimes makes me feel like I can't do things for him fast enough, but I just try to keep calm and talk him through it. Which is sort of the same thing I have done with my sometimes impatient 2yr old, and I think mostly it just helps me to keep me calm.
Anyways.... look on the bright side, it could be incessant barking.
 
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Jasmine's whining has definitely picked up in the past coupe of months. She seems to do it whenever she wants attention. Everyone finds it quite amusing at first, but it can drive you nuts after a while. If only she weren't so cute... =)
 

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Ditto to what everyone is saying.

Cooter will get up on the couch in the evenings and whine and whine and whine. Were rubbing him and petting him and he's still whining. Drives me batty!!!
 
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Huck has been very whiney (sp?) lately also. People I've talked to say to just ignore it. I tell them easier said than done. Usually he just wants attention - not like I'm not home with him all day 24/7 as it is. I have also found that he is beginning to need more "alone time" with me than in the past. Every time we start to play (just him & me) Grace comes charging in to get in on the romp. He immediately quits playing, lays down with his head on his paws and whines! It's actually kinda funny but I have started putting Grace away at least once a day so Huck & I can have our own special "bonding/play" time. Boy, I just re-read that and ya' know - it sounds kinda pathetic, don't you think? :eek:

[ March 31, 2006, 05:24 PM: Message edited by: Lynne & Huck ]
 
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Francis is 7 years old and he was once a very whiny dog. I put up with it for a while but once my brother remarked that he couldn't handle the whining when Franny stayed over their house I knew it was time to put a stop to it. At first I walked away and shut the door whenever he started in but after that got old I finally resorted to the dreaded water-spray bottle.
Every time he started whining I said, "Quiet, Francis." If he started in again I just spritzed him dead in the face saying quietly yet forcefully, "Quiet, Francis" It took about 5 to 6 sprays but now he only does it if I've been a jerk and haven't noticed that he really needs to do his business. I taught my brother the "Quiet, Francis" in a sort of business-like way and it's worked for him also.
The water bottle has always been our treatment of last resort and it's always worked.
And to those who may think I'm a meanie, all I can say is "wait 'til I can post a picture of the new step stool I made so Franny can get up on MY bed more easily" It's padded and has cushioned "side rails" so he won't fall off the sides. Heck, except for the blindness, I'd love to live his life!

[ March 31, 2006, 06:11 PM: Message edited by: Beverly Anne Cawley ]
 
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Bev- you are by no means alone in being a "meanie" as I've found the squirt bottle the most effective training tool we have. Works like a charm. In fact most times I only need to show it to Huck and he'll stop what he's doing and slink into the other room (complete with the most disgusting dirty looks of course). Now with our Lab, Grace, she tries to eat the water as it comes out of the spray bottle! Oh well, 50/50 is not bad.
 

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"Cooter will get up on the couch in the evenings and whine and whine and whine. Were rubbing him and petting him and he's still whining."


Umm maybe thats because you are rewarding the behavior. Dog whines he gets petted quess what dog then becomes more likely to whine not less. By petting you are not servicing a need but reinforcing the whining behavior.
 

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Here's the point whining has been very successful for the dog it gets him what he wants. Think of it from the dog prespective he does not know you are going to do it anyway.

With an entranched behavior the punishment is less effective especially if it is not consitently metered out. General speaking humans are more tolerant of such behavior early in the day and less at night. So in general what happen if the human ignores the behavior eary in the day they are actually inadverently rewarding the behavior because the dog eventual gets what he wanted. Later in the day the dog is punished and becomes confused. Such inconsistency is not likely to help the situation

The Second problem is know as an Extinction Burt With entrenched behavior if they are ignored and sometime even punished they do not end with a wimper but go out with a bang. The dog will become even more adement louder, longer etc in trying to make what once worked work again. If you reward this behavior you just tregthen the idea if at first you do not succeed it was because you did not try long enough or hard enough.


The easiest solution is to reward the behavior. The reward must be delivered consitently just as in training any new behavior. The reward also must be something the dog does not want, i.e. a trip to the crate. An example would be any time the dog whines yipee he gets to go in his crate. The reward must come as soon as the dog starts not 5 minutes in. Soon the dog learn hey mom and dad are pretty stupid they think whining mean I want to go in my crate. The dog stops whining pretty quickly. The basic premise is more fleshed out in the following articles You Won the Prize! and
Puppy Mouthing
I must say I have a different take on the notion of negative punishments. To begin with I don't call them that and think the semantics of them is a problem because of the attitude it creates. I do not want to take anything away from the dog as a punishment so that they will decrease the chance of the behavior happening. I Reward the dog. Just not with the Reward they would prefer.

...If a good friend wants to get you to go golfing every weekend and you hate golf you could tell them how boring it is and keep debating the point forever.

Or you could enthusiastically head to the course wearing the most outrageous outfit you can put together at Goodwill. Hit the ball in the opposite direction because it is so much fun watching everyone's expression (besides you were never much of a conformist) Talk constantly. Hug them and scream with joy at every stroke they make and express your amazement at their skills. Then tell them what a wonderful time you have golfing with them and can't wait to do it again. I bet your friend won't be available for another round for months.
The thing is it does not address the need of the dog to whine in the first place. As is often the case end one obnoxious behavior another obnoxious behavior often even worse than the first takes it place.

While not the case for every dog but often the obnxious behavior born out of excitment is cause for lack of a better term a lack of self control.
Examples include pulling on lead, rushing through doorways, jumping up while greeting. they can be addressed individually but if addressed comprhensively you can develop the dogs self control TEACHING SELF CONTROL
 

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"Works like a charm. In fact most times I only need to show it to Huck and he'll stop what he's doing and slink into the other room (complete with the most disgusting dirty looks of course). Now with our Lab, Grace, she tries to eat the water as it comes out of the spray bottle! Oh well, 50/50 is "

Who'd a thunk it a dog bred to water retrieve does not find water adversive :roll:

I have never found water spray very effective at extinqushing or ending a particular behavior. That is the number of incidents a dog does a particular unwanted behavior remains relative the same. What the water bottle does do is disrupt the behavior. It is good for stoping the behavior once it begin not at preventing it. Thereby rather than being punishing or and adversive it is a disruptive stimulus.

As such it ends annoying habit once started which in of itself is enough for most is enough. Second by ending the habit it allows those who chose to the to engage the dog in a more appropriate behavior and reward the dog for such. This alows for a more permenant change in behavior and less likelihood the bad behavior will reoccur espeicial if the new trained behavior is incompatable with it.
 
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Louie is a major whiner!! He not only whines when he wants something...we tell him "speak"!! and he whines! LOL

He also squeals like a little pig too!!
 
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I once read that squirting a dog in the face isn't the way to go as you can miss and hit the eyes.
 

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Henrietta is the champion on whining. She could whine like a princess 24 hours, sometimes she even whines in her sleep, I swear!! :D
 

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I just got a 10 week old puppy. She whines INCESSANTLY! I know that she's whining a lot because she just got a new home and is anxious to have left her family but there is NOTHING we can do to get her to stop! If we leave her to walk around alone she whines, take her outside she whines, play with her she whines, giver her food she whines, if we put her in the crate she goes crazy and will NOT stop whining/barking, if we get mad at her she whines, and if we pet her she whines more! Also, when she whines she is wagging her tail and seems happy. I'm hoping she will get used to her new surroundings and the whining will stop. We can't figure out what is causing her to whine so we have no idea how to get her to quit. Any ideas?!
 
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