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Flash is a year old and we walk around our 5 acre property every night for some exercise and exploring and our 10 yr old lab comes with us. The lab comes when he's called and knows where he can and cannot go and is not on a leash.

Flash will tug and pull and try to run when we first go out and then he'll get the leash in his mouth and start tugging on it and spinning around. The last couple of nights he has started jumping at my hand trying to bite the leash, it's almost like he's telling me to let go of it so he can run. I've tried stopping when he pulls and not starting to walk again until he relaxes or sits, but as soon as we start walking again he's right back to pulling on it. It only lasts for about 10-15 minutes and then I think he's worn himself out and he walks really well with me for the last 15-20 minutes.

I let him off the leash the first two nights and both times he ended up on the neighbors property and would not come back when called. I had to chase him down and bribe him with treats. The neighbors don't care but if he heads the other direction he'll encounter a fairly busy road and I can't take that chance, so he doesn't get let off the leash anymore.

So, in summary......I let him off the leash at first & now I won't. He sees the other dog is not leashed and wants to be "free" too. Any tips to help me correct his behavior before it gets worse would be appreciated.
 

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1. the management solution if he is tugging on the les with his mouth etc because he is hyper is to engage him first in a game like tug of war with a toy or even the leash ( yes there are leashes made specifically for tugging) be for attempting to walk


Tug of War

Dog owners have been admonished for decades to never play tug of war with their dogs because of the risk of it increasing aggression and/or dominance in the dog. Even many dog resource people such as breeders, trainers and veterinarians caution against this game. This is partly a failure to discriminate between agonistic behavior (conflict resolution & defensive aggression) and predatory behavior. Also, many people have issues about witnessing intensity. Intensity is not aggression, however. [/LEFT]
Played with rules, tug-of-war is a tremendous predatory energy burner and good exercise for both dog and owner. It serves as a barometer of the kind of control you have over the dog, most importantly over his jaws. The game doesn't make the dog a predator: he already is one. The game is an outlet. It’s intense, increases dog focus and confidence and plugs into something very deep inside them. The big payoff is in lowered incidence of behavior problems due to understimulation and a potent motivator for snappy obedience. There is a maxim in training: control the games, control the dog. It's also extremely efficient in terms of space and time requirements.
Tugging leashes

2. Equipment Don't know what equipment you are using but you may need more help from it to limit pulling. Head halters and no-pull harness general work well to limit pulling Keep in mind a dogs natural instinct is to resist pressure So if a traditional harness puts pressure on the chest when the dog pull it just cause the dog to pull harder the same is often true for flat buckle collars as well.

A Case for GLs

Sporn no-pull halter

sensi-ble harness Insturction for use

3. A dog never pulls on a leash that is not attached to a human, It takes two to pull. If you move at a pace the dog is more comfortable will the pulling ceases

4.
Flash will tug and pull and try to run ...would not come back when called. I had to chase him down and bribe him with treats
Flash like most dogs his age is lacking in self control. Self control can be taught and is one of the few areas I find that dogs actual generalize quite well.


see my last post in the mood swings thread for links on training exercises to improve impulse control.


the most important link for you is
The Overstimulated Hyper Dog

It will explain how a hyper dog is incapable of actually learning. So for the most part trying to teach Flash to walk well on leas when the Golden is running around free, and flash is over excited about the walk in the first place is not going to happen, and onkly lead to fustration on your part. You need to teach flash first to walk well and properly on leash in a low distraction environment. Once he is capable of working in a low distraction setting you can then increase distractions gradually. But youcan not expect a dog to do what you want him to do without training him what it is you want. And this need to start in a low distraction environment. Trying to teach Flash to walk calmly on a loose lease in a highly stimulating environment is setting him up for failure. Teach him first to walk on a loose leash in the living room etc. If this means he must forgo walks around the property with the Golden for now so be it. There are other ways for him to get exercise.


would not come back when called
some other useful links

DEPOSITS INTO THE PERFECT RECALL ACCOUNT

DISTRACTIONS FOR YOUR RECALL

LIST OF REINFORCERS


I had to chase him down
For most dogs the game of chase is highly rewarding therefore engaging in it just makes it more likely the dog will engage in it again. Most dog if you move toward them will move away however if you move away from them especial if it appears you have something they may want the dog will come toward you. Moving away from the dog is generally more productive than moving toward it.
 

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If I were you, I would keep my Basset on the leash, especially if within sight of a road or where traffic goes along, or you'd never forgive yourself if Flash got knocked down and injured as happened to someone else on here quite recently.

I'm a lifelong owner of Bassets, always have two or mostly three at different ages at a time including several rehomes and none of them could be safely let off leads apart from an enclosed park, beach or fenced/gated field because as soon as they get the whiff of rabbits, pheasants etc (as we've always lived in the country) my Bassets, and most I know/have known, just take off following the scent and suddenly develop 'deafness' and only come back when they feel like it!!!
 

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none of them could be safely let off leads apart from an enclosed park, beach or fenced/gated field
While every dog is different the nature of how basset hunt make them better candidates for off leash endeavers than other scent hound. Bassets in general work closer to humand and check back in and move with the human compared to other scent hounds, The last four basset I have owned I can and have trusted off leash provided the area was rural and remote enough to do so safely given the distant they would travel. That is not the case with the harrier or a number of beagles.

While there is a risk to off leash walking there is also a risk to on leash walking and/or not walking at all with the dogs. Whether or not this can be done safely and in what circumstances need to be done a dog by dog basis.
 
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