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Discussion Starter #1
I want to thank you all for your support. It turns out Zoey has Valley Fever. The Dr. said it was a moderate case but she will be on the anti-fungal meds for 6 months. She had another bad siezure last Tues. but nothing since. She is still on all the other meds the Dr. prescribed and I'll need to take her back in 2 months for blood work. It has been a rollercoster ride of a week but I am glad we have found the cause of the seizures and can get her well again. Thank you again for being a tremundous group of people!
 

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Is this something common to dogs in your part of the country? Glad you have a diagnosis- please keep us posted, and good luck with this!
 

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I am glad to hear that you were able to find out what was wrong with Zoey. Hope she makes a full recovery over the coming months. Please keep us posted on how she is doing. Any pictures of your girl?
 

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Do you have any info on Valley Fever? I've never heard of it. I live next door to you in NM and wonder if this is something else I should be watchful for?

Lots of drool for Zoey = hope the drugs knock it out of her system.
 

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Do you have any info on Valley Fever? I've never heard of it. I live next door to you in NM and wonder if this is something else I should be watchful for?[/b]
Yes it affects humans as well

valley fever

Valley Fever Project Contains a map of the area effected by it, Southern New Mexico not Northern sections

Valley Fever in Dogs
Dogs primarily contract Valley Fever in the low desert regions of Arizona, New Mexico and
southwestern Texas and the central deserts of California. Dogs accompanying people traveling
through these areas or wintering in these warm climates have about the same chance as their
owners of being infected. ...



Symptoms
The most common early symptoms of primary pulmonary Valley Fever
in dogs are:
• coughing
• fever
• weight loss
• lack of appetite
• lack of energy
Some or all of these symptoms may be present as a result of infection in the lungs. As
the infection progresses, dogs can develop a severe pneumonia that is visible on x-rays.
Sometimes the coughing is caused by pressure of swollen lymph nodes near the heart pressing on
the dog’s windpipe and irritating it. These dogs sound like they have bronchitis.
Additional symptoms develop when the infection spreads outside the lungs
and causes systemic or disseminated disease. This form of Valley Fever is almost
always more serious than when it is only in the lungs. Signs of disseminated
Valley Fever can include:
• lameness or swelling of limbs
• back or neck pain
• seizures and other manifestations of central nervous system swelling
• soft swellings under the skin that resemble abscesses
• swollen lymph nodes under the chin, in front of the shoulder blades, or behind
the stifles
• non-healing skin ulcerations or draining tracts that ooze fluid
• eye inflammation with pain or cloudiness[/b]
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I will keep you all posted. Valley fever is very common here - in both humans and animals. The only symptom she had was the siezures. She is doing better each day but is a little loopy on the meds.
 

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Thanks for the info! I hope none of the 2 or 4-leggers here ever catch it. Sounds very unpleasnat.

Lots of healing drool for Zoey - I bet she'll feel much better when it's gone.
 

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Valley fever can be nasty stuff. I was tested for it many years ago during my first year of college (I went to NAU). For me, it turned out to be epstein barr/mono), but I have known two-leggers who have had it.

I hope he gets to feeling better REAL soon!

Janice and little Ruby
 
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