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I'm sure you all have your own horror stories about trying to clip your basset's nails. It takes 2 of us to get Hilda's nails trimmed and we both wind up sweaty and crabby afterward. When we got Thor (D.O.B. 10/07/06), we had lofty ideas about training him to tolerate nail clippings by frequently handling his feet and nails, clipping them frequently from the start, giving him treats afterward, etc. Our plan is already going out the window. He whines and tries to pull his feet away. At this rate, he'll be worse than Hilda. I didn't think that was possible. Does any one have any good advice we can use while he's still young?

Thanks
 

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We groom our dogs on a grooming table. I can't take credit for their good behavior as far as tolerating grooming. The breeder started that with them. I think it helps having them on a table. You can reach them better and they seem to be more submissive. Maybe that's why the Vet always lifts them on her table :blink: :blink: Seriously, that might help and if maybe your Husband can pet them and try to soothe them while you do the dirty work, they'll associate nail clipping with affection and end with a big praise and a treat! Maybe that way the whole experience will take on a positive feeling for them. Also, I always play with my dogs toes, tail, touch their mouths, ears, everything almost daily. This way they're kind of immuned to almost any touch. Good Luck!
 

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I do Lightning's when he's asleep. You could take out his spleen without anesthesia if he's asleep. Stomps, on the other hand, won't let me touch his feet. I very happily pay a professional $5 to take care of it for me. He doesn't even bat an eye at her.
 

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I dremel my dogs' nails, and I too use a grooming table. Edith is good, but Charlie never has been and never will be. I wind up in a lather by the time I'm finished with him because it's a battle of wills that neither of us is willing to lose! I just brought home my third basset, and her breeder assures me she's fine with having nails done. I just hope that's true!
 
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I dremel my dogs' nails, and I too use a grooming table. Edith is good, but Charlie never has been and never will be. I wind up in a lather by the time I'm finished with him because it's a battle of wills that neither of us is willing to lose! I just brought home my third basset, and her breeder assures me she's fine with having nails done. I just hope that's true![/b]

Yes, I agree that the grooming table works best. And also, starting with the hind feet, for some reason works better, too.
By the time they get to real objection, you are already half done. By the way, what does "dremel" mean? What frustrates me the most in cutting nails, is that not only are they so thick, but I can never be sure where the vein starts. Because one of my bassets yelps at the very site of the clippers, I can never be sure if I really am in the danger zone.
 

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You need the services of my daughter's friend, who works for us part time and for a dog groomers the other days. She is great. She comes to our house, does both dogs' toenails and I happily pay her a bit more than the going rate for not having to drag them to the vet's or to a groomers. Elmer is extremely touchy about this feet, ever since he had a bad experience with toenail cutting that we won't discuss here because it makes me angry :angry: Over time, Cari has gotten him so he doesn't put up much of a fuss, even though we are both sweating and covered in fur when we are done.

I think that a lot of people just cut them too short and that's where the dogs become afraid. Don't try to cut too much at once. Really watch for the vein. Get a flashlight and hold it up to the nail and mark it with a marker, then cut off small amounts just to that point. Easier said than done, I know.

Good luck!
 

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Emma wasn't too pleased first time I tried clipping her nails,
but I didn't gave up. I hold her in my armpit and succeded
in clipping them, being careful not taking too much.
I think she realised it wasn't a way to murder her, and most
important - that I wouldn't give up no matter how she protested.
No she just stands still on the floor while I do them, and Doris
has accepted it too after she looked at Emma. As a matter,
she came running and laid down on her back reaching me her
paws. :blink:
 

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My method is now to to make many small cuts, not cut one big chunk. Cut a little from the top, then a little from the side, other side... until I kind of cut so little I shave across it making it straight. I still have to hold him & talk to him nicely and I tell him "just a little bit..." as we go. Kinda like if you cut your fingernails using maybe 10-20 little cuts rather than a big chop.

If they're long to begin with you need to start only cutting a small amount total. You just can't go from long to short right away, gotta do it in stages. Wait a week and cut again until you eventually get to a good nail length. This will build trust too, so they know they may not like it but at least it's not painful.

I took José to Petsmart twice but truthfully he was so terrified of that place, I just don't think they used any TLC or even cared. Never again!

BTW, I cut Josés nail since he was a two months old. He didn't mind when he was a puppy but he sure doesn't like it now.
 

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My husband clips the nails while I distract them with cheese. I don't just give them the cheese, I smash pieces of it down on a plate so they have to work at it and it really does help to distract them.
 

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My husband clips the nails while I distract them with cheese. I don't just give them the cheese, I smash pieces of it down on a plate so they have to work at it and it really does help to distract them.
[/quote
Not your good china, I'm sure! :p he he he! My husband was joking around last night when we were out with friends about how the dogs like to "be the prewash cycle for the dishwasher". Even though I don't really let them, I was sure that everyone was thinking to themselves that they didnt want to eat my dish at the next potluck! :lol:
 

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I'm sure you all have your own horror stories about trying to clip your basset's nails. It takes 2 of us to get Hilda's nails trimmed and we both wind up sweaty and crabby afterward. When we got Thor (D.O.B. 10/07/06), we had lofty ideas about training him to tolerate nail clippings by frequently handling his feet and nails, clipping them frequently from the start, giving him treats afterward, etc. Our plan is already going out the window. He whines and tries to pull his feet away. At this rate, he'll be worse than Hilda. I didn't think that was possible. Does any one have any good advice we can use while he's still young?

Thanks[/b]

At my vet's office, they have a 'Wellness Plan' that you can do that includes all their shots with a few perks such as free nail clippings and day care if we need to drop her off during the day while the 'bug' man comes! lol It's a wonderful package...my other dog, Jeffery (a basset mix of some sort) has to be muzzled because he hates nail clippings so much!
 

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When my pups are in their "puppy sleep" (the sleep you just can't wake a dog from), is when I attempt the paw biting maching aka nail clipper. On the days I don't clip them and they are asleep I walk up to them and for 10-15 min I will play with their paws, Pull and squeeze gently on the nail and generally just bug them until they ignore me. Now, I can walk up to them when they are asleep and they really just kind of give me an, "aw mom!" moan and take it... ;)
 

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If they don't totally panic, I believe it is best just to force them to do it. If one quits when they wriggle/whine/gnaws your hand et cetera, they for sure won't be any calmer the next time around. And it might be an idea to cut them often, something that will keep both the dog and yourself in practice. (most Basset Hound claws needs to be clipped often anyway)

Mr. Runcible has never had any objection to me clipping his claws, although it is not his favorite thing. Sometimes he fall asleep during the whole procedure.
 
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