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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Murray has been a therapy dog for over 5 years now, and has always had a twice monthly commitment at our local nursing home. In December he was diagnosed with discoid lupus, which causes the tissue on his nose to break down and periodically develop sores. I won't take him into a hospital with an open sore, so have had to give up our commitment.

So we're going to shift gears and do more educational programs.

On Monday we visited a local highschool with 4 other therapy teams. The high school seniors we visited spend 1/2 of their day at a regional teaching hospital - they all want to become doctors, and the doctor who mentors them wanted us to talk about the role of pet therapy in patient care. It was a fun presentation with a great group of young people.

When one door closes.....
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
Sounds like a good transition and I wish Murray the best. I hope the lupus doesn't get too painful.
Thanks for your concern about Murray- here's a quote from my post in December about discoid lupus- it's basically an auto-immune skin disorder which requires lifelong treatment: topical Tacrolimus, vitamin E supplements, and no direct exposure to sunlight on his nose ( I made him a little 'nose bonnet' that ties around his muzzle and neck as a sunshield so he can enjoy the sun this summer- he's not thrilled with it, but he's such a laid back guy that he puts up with it )

Quote from December post:

"DLE is considered a benign and milder variant of SLE, and the lesions are confined to the skin. DLE is the second most common immune-mediate skin disease in the dog, and one of the most common skin disorders affecting the face.
Discoid Lupus is also the most common skin disorders that are exacerbated by sunlight (UV-radiation).
Discoid Lupus may have a waxing and waning course and therefore there may be times when medication is unnecessary.

Quite often DLE begins with loss of pigmentation of the planum nasale (nose) or on the lips. For example, a normally black nose may acquire partly slate-blue, grey or pink colour. The typical moist and cobblestone surface of the nose becomes dry and smooth and the depigmented lesions progresses into destruction of the tissue.
Prognosis for Discoid Lupus is usually good, although treatment must usually be continued for life.
 
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