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Sometimes I think about putting my dogs on roller skates so I can pull them behind me a bit more easily.
That would be hilarious! I put some aqua boots on Doppler (they were only four dollars on clearance from Petsmart) and he did not enjoy them.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
My vote for "Basset Movers" would be the furniture slider discs. I just have to figure out an attachment method.
 

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Hilarious! But sad at the same time...it can't be good that she drags him on the asphalt and concrete...or on anything for that matter!
 

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Yeah, haha. In the full episode he fixes the problem. She used to carry him up and down the stairs as well! He never really walked anywhere. LOL
 

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Arry, how did the dog whisperer fix this problem? I couldn't find a full length video for this. Porter sometimes has a similar problem, not nearly as bad but he would refuse to walk and just sit there on the sidewalk.
 

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Sometimes I think about putting my dogs on roller skates so I can pull them behind me a bit more easily.
So glad I'm not the only one seen trying to drag my basset down the road. I'm always reminding him that "this is a walk, not a smell." Roller skates might do the trick!
 

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I think this is only something a basset owner can fully understand. people always looks at me funny when they see me pulling the dog or when we are just standing on the sidewalk and not going anywhere. they have no idea how difficult walking a basset can be. My Porter only wants to go in one direction and most of the time its not the direction I want to go.
 

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A car crawler would work too, and if you put a dog bed on it they probably wouldn't care so long as you didn't hit the bumps too hard. Shock absorbers would help that a bit. Of course at that point you might as well buy a wagon and be done with it.
 

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I can't remember how he fixed it. I'll look it up on Netflix tonight, it is available to instantly stream on there, if you have it. It is season 2. The first 1/2 is about actress Denise Richards' spoiled dogs. :rolleyes:
 

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Most bassets typical reaction to stress is negative. Not in the sense of being bad but in the sense of not doing anything. Hence the flat basset failure to move ect. In most cases it is a stress reaction. pulling on the leash etc creates more stress and even more negative reaction. Avoid creating the stress and power struggle and the behavior goes away. Rewarding the dog while it is moving forward with food/praise etc creates a dog dog that is more willing to continue. over time the value of the rewards is transfered to walking on leash and it becomes a reward onto itself. It is basical how all the obstacle training in agility work. At some point just doing the obstacle becomes rewarding itself through value transfer.


The closet I have had to deal with this because I over time create a dog that loves to walk was Toughy when he was a puppy would have a similar reaction to walking outside, but this stress was related to being fearful outside. He would not want to leave the house but would run when headed back. Working on desensitiving him to being outside solved the problem.

Stress in working dogs
No amount of rest and recovery will spare a dog from stress if your very interactions with it are based on punitive methods of training and handling. Your very presence will be a stressor even if the dog is pleased to see you or looks to be happy and playful. Because punishment is such an ineffective tool for training it often leaves the subject confused. Confusion in itself is stressful, as is being subjected to painful or fearful events. If you are the creator of such events then it stands to reason that you yourself will be viewed with a degree of fear and confusion by the dog. The best way to reduce your dogs stress is to adopt a training and handling approach based on positive reinforcement. Your relationship with your dog is perhaps the single most important factor in how content your dog is and how well he can learn and work.
Canine Stress

How To Recognize Stress In Your Dog
Stress is characterized as “positive” (manifesting itself in increased activity) and “negative” (manifesting itself in decreased activity). Picture yourself returning home after a hard day at work. You are welcomed by a mess on your new, white rug. What is your response? Do you explode, scream at your dog, your children and then storm through the house slamming doors? Or, do you look at the mess in horror, shake your head in resignation, feel drained of energy, ignore the dog and the children and then go to your room? In the first example, your body was energized by the chemicals released into the bloodstream. In the second example, your body was debilitated.

Dogs react in a similar manner, and stress triggers either the fight or flight response. Positive stress manifests itself in hyperactivity, such as running around, bouncing up and down or jumping on you, whining, barking, mouthing, getting in front of you or anticipating commands. You may think your dog is just being silly and tiresome, but for the dog, those are coping behaviors. Negative stress manifests itself by lethargy, such as freezing, slinking behind you, running away or responding slowly to a command. In new situations, he seems tired and wants to lie down, or sluggish and disinterested. These are not signs of relaxation, but are the coping behaviors for negative stress.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
We are having fun talking about our shared experiences with stubborn hounds, but as funny as parts of the above video are, it brings back scary memories of Mr. Buddylee's neck problems 6 years ago. That's when we made sure he never goes out for a walk without wearing a harness to distribute the tugging pressure. Pulling dogs by the neck is not healthy for any dog! Maybe a skate board would work?
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Hilarious! But sad at the same time...it can't be good that she drags him on the asphalt and concrete...or on anything for that matter!
This may be a repeat reply: Buddylee had a major neck problem about 6 years ago, and thank goodness it healed without major surgery. From that time on, we have used a harness to distribute tugging pressure. So the video, at the beginning, was fun to watch, but then brought back awful memories. Another solution for quick walks could be a skate board (not really).
 

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Ugh...and my pea brain didn't even think of the stress on the poor dog's neck! I was just thinking about the bumps, bruises and scrapes on the poor pup!!

I'm glad Buddylee was able to heal without major surgery!

I mostly use a regular collar when I walk Annie but sometimes will use the anti-pull harness instead. Either way I have never had to pull Annie along, she is a very good walking partner (aside from the stopping and sniffing every 6 steps and occasional "oops I missed a smell back there" u-turns every once in a while).
 

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I don't even bother with a regular collar. Porter knows how to wiggle out of it. He is on a harness and I still have to drag him once in a while. People always think he is an old dog and that he is tired. He is only 4! I think he is just lazy...:)
 

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I use a regular harness, and it's so much easier to walk him.

I tried a no-pull harness last week, and he was able to get out of it and run off, so back to the regular harness!
 

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Virga's harness is getting too small so we're looking into getting a no pull harness. I think we're going with the Sporn harness. From what I've read I think I like that one the best.
 
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