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Poor Molly... wishing you a speedy recovery. hope your tummy feels better soon. i can relate to being scared because my person is clumsy and sometimes drops things from the counter, esp in the kitchen. and i run away because i don't want to have things falling on my head, except raindrops.
--your pal Worm

ps. re: "thundershirts" how interesting they make this. there is a good movie w/Claire Danes about Temple Grandin, a woman w/fairly severe autism who eventually got a PhD against the odds. she actually made a "thundershirt" contraption for herself, after finding that it relieved her anxiety too. there is a lot of evidence for this type of body compression helping w/anxiety. in the first minute of this preview, you can see the wooden contraption:

 

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Molly McFreckles,
Glad you get to come home today!
And re: your Addison's, did you know that JFK also had Addison's?
Jfk Addison's Disease | John F. Kennedy's Addison's disease was probably caused by rare autoimmune disease - Los Angeles Times

You are in good company! AND you have a Momma who will keep a really close eye on you so i think you are in good hands too.

--Worm McFreckles (I do believe I'm from the McFreckles lineage too..)

ps. below is a blurb on Addison's in people, dunno how different it is in dogs. But people can live a healthy & normal life, it says, which is good : ) also, i believe stress makes it worse (and wonder if her current crisis was triggered by the stress from the storm? with that much stress, the cortisol gets depleted fast, resulting in the Addisonian crisis). so wonder if stress management is going to be important for Molly? if so, i would look into that "thundershirt" invention earlier in this post. I don't know about the actual product itself but the concept of helping w/anxiety, stress, and calming down using compression has a lot of evidence behind it. in our puppy playgroup, the trainer puts a lifejacket on a puppy when it needs a timeout, because of the same concept of its calming effect. ok-- that's my 2 cents and thought of the day fer ya, Molly... !

Disclaimer: please remember the medication and dosage below are for HUMANS not dogs...

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With proper medication, patients can expect to live a healthy and normal life (yay!)

A person with adrenal insufficiency should always carry identification stating their condition in case of an emergency. The card should alert emergency personnel about the need to inject 100 mg of cortisol if its bearer is found severely injured or unable to answer questions. The card should also include the doctor's name and telephone number and the name and telephone number of the nearest relative to be notified. When traveling, a needle, syringe, and an injectable form of cortisol should be carried for emergencies. A person with Addison's disease also should know how to increase medication during periods of stress or mild upper respiratory infections. Immediate medical attention is needed when severe infections, vomiting, or diarrhea occur, as these conditions can precipitate an Addisonian crisis. A patient who is vomiting may require injections of hydrocortisone, since oral hydrocortisone supplements cannot be adequately metabolised.
 

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Molly McFreckles,

so glad you are feeling better now. and I bet your brother Winston is too. you are on some strong meds. are you eating now?

you're welcome. since your ma is a smart historian, i bet you she tells you lotsa stories...! hee hee. JFK McFreckles, i'm just picturing that, since you both have something in common. i do think the tag is a good idea, so everyone will know.

i like your pic-- you are too purty for words...

--Worm McFreckles
 

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Hello Ms. McFreckles,

thank you for the compliment-- i think i may be in "wub" :wub: with you, well a crush for sure.

if you see JFK McFreckles' house, please be sure to take lotsa pictures and tell us all about it! hee hee, my person has a l'il bro and she says, yeah, l'il bros can be like that, esp when ur growing up... later u learn to arrpeciate them more.

i don't think i like your vet very much either if she said you are fat. you do not look fat to me. BUT.... since we are on my favorite topic of FOOD (Estha has me pegged), i will tell you the story of CARROTS & ME:

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CARROTS & ME. By Worm McF.
Our family friend (of the hound variety) got overweight & his vet put him on a carrot-as-treats only diet, too. He did well and lost weight and loooves carrots. So my person wanted to feed me carrots, too. but i spit them out, like this :p
My person was sad: how am i going to get Worm to eat his carrotz? Well, first came chicken and beef and turkey baby food. (because i was having upset tummy i was only eating baby food and kibble) i licked it all up 'cause it's meaty and tasty. Then came carrot baby food, which sometimes got mixed in w/the meat baby food, or it was mixed with chicken. YUMMY!! I guess i musta started to like carrot flavor more. Then came boiled carrots, which were boiled with chicken and celery. Yum, yum. all nice and mooshy. Then one day, my person gave me raw carrots (the 'baby' ones, peeled) and chomp chomp i went. now, they are one of my fav foods! AND i don't have to fight with the other dogs at the dog park for carrots. most of them don't like them. so they give the carrots to ME, ME, ME!!

I hope you try and get to like carrots someday, Molly. They are really great and refreshing. and crunchy. i get a few every night for bedtime snack and to clean my teeth. let us know how everything goes.
--Worm
 
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