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We had a rough morning this morning. I am trying to get my two kids (8 and 4) ready for school and me ready for work. Marshall and Molly are 17 weeks old and we still do not have this housebreaking thing down. I know it takes time, especially with them home alone during the day, so I am trying to be very patient, but today I need to vent.

Will they ever Learn??!! There I've said it. I love my hounds, but I really wish they would understand the house rules.

I took them out first thing and they did their business - at that point. I brought them back in and commenced getting ready. As the morning progressed I ended up with poo in my bathroom, poo in the living room, and pee in at least one other room. And of course they did not get reprimanded because I did not see them actually do it - except for the one and it was all over by that time.

I know "they" say that when a dog has an accident in the house it is because they are not being watched, but believe me I am trying. It's hard when I have so many other things to take care of with the kids and all. I didn't even get my makeup put on this morning until I got to work. I sat in the parking lot and put it on there.

Again, I know it takes time, and my working during the day slows down the process, but I will be so glad when this all works itself out. I know it is possible, because we have gone through this before.

So, how long did it take for you to housebreak your dear hound(s)???? :blink:
 

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I'd take their head and stick it in it and yell no; then put them outside.

And if they tired to eat it I'd yell NO more. :blink: :lol:
 

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I'd take their head and stick it in it and yell no; then put them outside.

And if they tired to eat it I'd yell NO more. :blink: :lol:[/b]
Um, not the best tactic.

Getting them on a rigid schedule might help, with lots of praise when they do the right thing.Try training them to ring a bell to go out- it's easier than it sounds and allows them to give you a clear signal that they need to go.

Bassets respond much better to positive reinforcement than to punishment.
 

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Olivia is almost 11 weeks, and I'm still housetraining her.

I have to constantly keep my eye on her. If I can't, she goes into the crate while I'm taking care of whatever I need to deal with. Even if it's for 5 mins., it'll save you a lot of aggravation.!

Just remember to take them out just before and right after being in the crate.
 

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I understand actually disciplining a dog( or anyone) nowadays is not politically correct, but with those problems I'd experiment a little.
 

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you can't let a basset out of your sight at that age. If you can't watch her, you should crate her.

My Venus is 2 and can't hold it very long after she rings the bell on the door to go outside. At that point I'm hurdling everything in the house to let her out.
 

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I understand actually disciplining a dog( or anyone) nowadays is not politically correct, but with those problems I'd experiment a little.[/b]
Using "NO" isn't the issue. The problem with "rubbing the nose in it" is the timing. They don't know it was them that made the mess on the floor in the first place. The most this will teach them is, whenever there is a pile of poo near them, you get mad.

Scold them with a "NO" if you catch them in the act, but immediately take them outside so you can praise them when they do it outside.

I remember someone once saying, when a pet owner finds a mess on the floor, they should rub their own noses in it, as it is their fault they let their dog do it in the first place. <_<
 

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Rubbing his nose in his mess is actually punishment and not reinforcement. The goal of reinforcement is to increase a behavior; negative reinforcement is achieved when something is withdrawn and the behavior increases. (ex: If you take your dog out of his crate because he is crying, it is more likely he will whine again next time because he knows you will eventually take him out of the crate. You are reinforcing his whining by withdrawing crate time). The goal of punishment is to decrease a behavior. So rubbing the dog's face in his mess is used to decrease his accidents, but from my expirence this is not as effective as other methods such as reinforcement, positive or negative.

I agree with those who suggest crating them when you can't watch them. It took us eight months to break Byron and he still does not run of the house when we are gone. I crate Byron at night, while I am in the shower, and even to get the mail. If I don't he always finds mischief to get into. Be patient; they are still very young.
 

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They don't know it was them that made the mess on the floor in the first place.[/b]
These dogs can open refrigerator doors, and scratch at a door to get you off the couch to answer it, while they sneak back and take your spot; but won't remember if they soiled the house? I don't believe it. My childhood dog would hang his head if he went near it.
 

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Regardless of whether you believe it's morally and/or functionally wrong, rubbing a BASSET'S nose in his own poo will not have a positive effect. Even if that were an effective training procedure, bassets, as a breed, are not the norm. Anything you want to achieve, you have to make the dog think it's in his own best interest. That's why praising them to the heavens, and supplementing with treats, when they pee or poo outside, then restricting their movement inside, seems to work best. You know those bracelets that say "WWJD" for What would Jesus do?" I'm going to make some that say "WWABD" for "What would a basset do?" Having bassets requires a whole different mindset.
 

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I don't know how that proves your point.

By "rubbing their nose in it" I don't mean putting feces on the dogs face. I mean getting them close to it, looking at it so they know what this is all about. Maybe each breed and dog is different, but I know it can work if the dog has access to going outside.
 

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Interesting discussion...I've taken pups, showed them the evidence, and told them how disappointed I was. But I doubt I'd do it with more than one pup, because I couldn't be sure who had done the deed. But then again, I sure as heck wouldn't be letting more than one (or any) unhousebroken pup(s) have free run of the house unsupervised... :lol: !!!
 

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:mellow: we have 3 bassets, when each came to us,we found that bassets are the most treet hungry dogs on earth,they will go pee or poop on comand,anytime and anywhere there could be a treet,2 are 6 years old and 1 is 9 never have they gone in the house and they are alone when we are at work,no crates, we have no dog door so they must hold it till one of us gets home,they know treets are coming,try it,it might keep the house neeter,and your saniety,
 

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Again, I know it takes time, and my working during the day slows down the process, but I will be so glad when this all works itself out. I know it is possible, because we have gone through this before.

So, how long did it take for you to housebreak your dear hound(s)???? :blink:
It varied from 2 weeks after we brought the pup home to about 6 months. We're talking about 90% accuracy, too, not 100%. It seemed to depend more on the house (easy access to outside, one convenient door) than any thing else. And I really do believe in the crate--it not only speeds up learning, it gives you a break! So far as rubbing the dogs nose in it, I read a really interesting comment recently about why it probably doesn't work, at least so far as pooping in the house goes. By and large, dogs love poop. Cat poop, goose poop, other dogs-- you name it. Bassets seem especially fond of it. So rubbing their noses in it is probably like rubbing their noses in a piece of cheese.....Just a thought.
[/quote] :rolleyes:
 

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Too much scolding is not very efficient on basset hounds. They are very sensitive dogs
that picks up the owners mood fast. I believe that to much yelling will make bassets harder
to house train. This because they are so aware of the owners mood, that they will try to hold
as long as possible just not to make the owner mad. When they have to go they will then try
to hide, for the same reason. With my bassets disapointment alone is enough punishment, no
additional scolding is necessary. I guess it really shows that I'm in a bad mood when I have
to wash poo and such like :p

(The strange thing is they are extremely sensitive when it comes to scolding, but doesn't care
much about praise)

For how long it takes. Mine was 90% at half a year, and 100% at perhaps a year, but when I
say 100% I mean 100%.

Good luck. With a little bit of patience you will prevail. I guess it must be harder with too pup though.
 

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...They don't know it was them that made the mess on the floor in the first place. The most this will teach them is, whenever there is a pile of poo near them, you get mad. ...[/b]

I don't know how that proves your point.

By "rubbing their nose in it" I don't mean putting feces on the dogs face. I mean getting them close to it, looking at it so they know what this is all about. Maybe each breed and dog is different, but I know it can work if the dog has access to going outside.[/b]

Rubbing the nose in it, getting them close to it, same thing. The dog doesn't know it was their mess that was made. If this was a tried and true technique, we'd find this technique in credible dog-training manuals.
 

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The crate is going to be your friend here. Just be sure they go out after they eat, and as soon as you have to turn your attention elsewhere, put them in their crate. Do they stay in their crate all day while you are gone? If so, I can understand your reluctance to keep them there all morning too.

The dog door we put in leading to a fenced in yard was the best thing we ever did.

Good luck. It does take a while, so dont expect too much.
 
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