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As my husband and I continue to count down the days until our new puppy is born (Oct. 9thish) we have had to take part in the age old debate. Male dog over female dog. We have no intention of breeding, this is just going to be a companion dog. I have two males cats and I prefer them over any female cat my family has ever owned. Any suggestions or obvious differences between the two genders when it comes to a basset?
 

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Hi and welcome to the board. I have two bassets, one of each, Ben and Lucy. I have to say that in my experience they are two totally different personalities. I don't know if my experiece is typical of all Bassets or not, but Ben is happy go lucky, always happy, tail always wagging, just a really happy guy. Lucy is happy, but very fickle. Her tail is only up and wagging when she has something that she shouldn't or something that Ben wants. Then she marches around the house as if to say Nah, Nah, Nah, I've got something that you don't. :p Ben was definately easier to house train, and you should take that into consideration. I don't know where you are located, but it isn't easy to train a basset in inclement weather. They like to think that they will melt in the rain and snow! :lol: The boys will usually be a little bigger than the girls if that is something that you are concerned about. When we went to look at the litters after they were born, I tried to go in with the mindset of finding the right puppy for our family, not too concerned with whether it was a boy or a girl. Good luck in your decision. We look forward to seeing those sweet baby pictures! Martha
 

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Generally I think you will find the females much smarter than their male counterparts, and quite a bit more independent. The males seem to need more attention.

They are both bassets though. Can't go wrong with either of them.
 

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I have to agree with what has been said so far. I am Mom to Sadie (ATB) & Spencer. Sadie was way smarter than Spencer. He is just a big ol silly guy. He has always been more playful than Sadie. She was serious and calm, even as a young dog. She did have her playful, silly moments, but they were on her terms! She was much more stubborn than Spencer ever was, but Spencer was much easier to housetrain. He was reliable at 6 mos, while Sadie was 9 mos before I could trust her not to potty in the house. I agree with mg - can't go wrong with either. Sadie & Spencer were like night & day, but I love them both!
 

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As a rule, with the bassets I've had through my house, the girls tend to be a bit more "Just so" dogs. They have rules, and firm opinions on how life should go. They are Princesses. The boys are as said above a bit more goofy and happy-go-lucky. I always joke that the only words my boyz actually say are "huh?" and "What?" and "Sure! Let's do it!" :rolleyes:
 

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I too agree with what the previous posters have said. Stickers my female is definitely smarter than her littermate, brother, Rusty. She is also more independent and sometimes aloof. He is a happy guy always, tail wagging, loves the world and everyone in it. She is a little more discreet and selective. But to me it wouldn't matter whether I had a male or female. ALL Bassets should be appreciated for who they are. WONDERFUL companions!!!
 

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We have had only neutered males. Both have been wonderful, loving, great companions, happy-go-lucky dispositions, goofy clowns that have us laughing, and both were very smart. Males are usually larger and weigh more than the females. Bubba was very large boned and weighed 65 pounds and was not overweight. Bogie is leaner, smaller boned, and weighs 45 pounds. Good luck in your pick of the litter, and I'm sure you will fall in love with either a male or female.
 

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I have a 7 year old neutered male named Francis and he is really a very, very smart dog. He was a pain in the neck to housebreak, though. He was into marking his territory BIG TIME and he humped anything that didn't get away fast enough but both problems were solved once he was neutered. He really figures things out remarkably well, though. Whatever gender you get, it will be a basset and they're all great!
 

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I've had just females - but it's been a big difference between them.
I think it's more individual - it's hard to imaging that all males are
dumber than all females. :blink:

Since I'm male.... :p

--------------------
<span style="color:#009900">The one that drools rules, :p
Steinar - daddy and foodslave to Emma and Doris!

http://www.basset-hound.net.tf</span>
 

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I've had quite a lot of bassets through my house, too. If there's trouble, it's usually started by a female. They seem to be more territorial. Not that I don't love them as much as the males, they just seem to have more issues.
 

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Lucy is happy, but very fickle. Her tail is only up and wagging when she has something that she shouldn't or something that Ben wants. [/b]
If there's trouble, it's usually started by a female...Not that I don't love them as much as the males, they just seem to have more issues.[/b]

Shocking :rolleyes: :D
 

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I agree that my female is much more opinionated and definately has her own set of house rules she lives by. My male is much more easy going but he is either much smarter or just more motivated than she is. He is the one who figures out how to get things off of the counter, how to escape and so forth.
 

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I only have one male basset and a female beagle/sharpei mix. I have also had many cats. Right now we have two dogs and 4 cats an equal amount of each. However it does seem that the boys are definately mommas boys both dog and cats. It has always seemed that the females preferred my husband. We had our female dog first and I have always wanted a basset and thought since stella tended to be dominant that we would get a male to hopefully ease any competition. Well not so! Duncan has become MR. bossy pants he is sooo obsessed with what stella is doing. But he is happy go lucky, loves everyone, has even helped our stella be more relaxed by example.
 

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Our basset puppy was just born on Thursday the 28th and now Im counting down the days till we get to bring him home....I dont know whether or not your planning on spaying or neutering but we went with a male because I dont plan on neutering him. We have a friend who breeds Bassets and would like to use our male to breed with their female when hes older. I was against getting a female because in my experiance with any female animal they tend to be more whiney. And thats something that just gets to me, I couldnt stand to hear my own daughters cry (I still cant and my youngest is a cry-baby..lol) Im a softie when it comes to things like that. So there is something to consider when deciding. Also males, Ive noticed, seem to be a bit easier to train with simple commands and house breaking. This is my first basset and Ive been reading that this breed in general takes a while to house train but Im hoping for the best. Good luck picking out your puppy and maybe youll just have to wait till they are born and go see them and pick out the one that pulls you right at the heart and it will just be meant to be!!!!

~Tyler David and Bruno~
 

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As my husband and I continue to count down the days until our new puppy is born (Oct. 9thish) we have had to take part in the age old debate. Male dog over female dog. We have no intention of breeding, this is just going to be a companion dog. I have two males cats and I prefer them over any female cat my family has ever owned. Any suggestions or obvious differences between the two genders when it comes to a basset?
 

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I have two bassets, they are brother and sister from the same litter. The basset hound is a pack dog and we felt that it wasn't right to keep just one dog. They have never ever howled, or even cried as pups because they had each other. This is something to think about if you're purchasing a basset and especially if you're going to leave your dog along while at work. Bassetts need company! Both dogs are very different in nature and temperament. Our male dog, Rufus, is slightly bigger. He is more trainable and wants to please. He is also more intelligent and biddable. On the lead he constantly looks back to see what you want and walks to heel. He is also closer to my wife and kids. He gets on with me, but is my wife's dog.

My female, Molly, is stubborn and will not walk to heel no matter how hard I have tried to teach. On the lead she pulls once she catches a sent, or just sits down and tries to pull her ears out of her collar, if she doesn't want to do what you are doing. Rufus actually tries to hold her back and help us when out walking by pulling her back, or noising her to get into line.

Both dogs are very gentle, but Molly is the more aggressive out of the two. She will bark and growl at an unannounced stranger, while Rufus will peep from behind my legs, or just watch from a distance. Their is a protective streak in Molly, I don't know if this is a female thing. She also cleans Rufus's eyes and snout regularly. He never licks us, but she will occasionally give an affectionate kiss. Molly is more playful and still thinks she is a pup. She loves to play and her tail is like an out of control helicopter. Both dogs don't play fetch very well. All they want to do is what they do best, sniff.

Molly is the Alfa between the two dogs and I have had to enforce my authority with her for my male dog's sake. When feeding the dogs I have to make them both sit and wait for me to give them their food, otherwise sometimes Molly would not allow my male to eat. She also claimed her spot in front of our open fire and on the dog bed. When he comes near she growls at him and he comes to us to tell on her. Again we have to protect Rufus if she growls and move her to allow him some time in front of the fire. Molly is the one who sents out on walks and not our male (both dogs are sterilised) and she humps Rufus, which is also dominant behaviour.

Molly is my dog. They are both Velcro dogs, but Molly is stuck to me like glue. She makes it clear that she likes me and wants to be with me over the rest of the family. I don't know if this is s female thing also.

Her coat us much softer than my male dog's. I groom both my dogs and they both trust me to clean their ears, teeth and cut their nails, but Rufus is more trusting than my female when it comes to having his nails done.

I often say that if I were able to fuse the two dogs together into one I would have the perfect dog. If I were ever going to purchase another basset hound, I don't know what gender that I would choose.

Regardless of gender, I think that bassets make wonderful family dogs. They are very gentle with kids and love their humans. They are a very soft breed and don't take well to scolding. They do need to be enforced who is the boss, but should never be shouted at, hit, or like any dog mistreated. It takes a lot of patience to own a basset.

Bassets love: sniffing, food, their home comfort and people, in that order. I love my dogs, they are my two friends and their is nothing in the world like their welcome when you come home, or just come down the stairs in the morning, or just go out of the room.
 

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as a single dog I think males do better than females , they tend to be goofier, and more laid back. but laid back is not always a posiitive trait as it can certain be a bit of aloofness. Males ten to be harder to train than females. there tend to be a broader range of personality both good in bad in males. Females are more consistent. Females predominate the sporting venues field work, obedience, agility, scent work and the like. but very often the very best are males.
 

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For me, once adult I find the male hounds are more 'needy' (sound familiar?) than the females. We have usually kept back two puppies from our litters but I've never noticed reliance on each other (because it's always been me first and each other second) but when down to our final two of our home-breds, we had a male and a female. I'd always hoped (if that's the word) that he'd go before she did but it didn't work out that way. We lost her about a year before him and after she died, it became clear how much he relied on her in times of angst (not that as members of a small pack each depended on the other). He'd never lived as a sole hound and when out particularly, would freak (become very defensive, hackles up) if another strange dog as much as looked at him. It wasn't long before we bought him a companion even if he wasn't especially impressed with her - Whippet puppies and the zoomies had him rushing for the safety of his chair.

Once we lost that boy, being left with our Whippet, I fast discovered that there's nothing like a Basset - and a Whippet certainly isn't that. I'd decided on the breed because I felt I needed something taller and lighter. So in came Frankie at 4 months because I wanted the relatively closer relationship from a Basset male, as opposed to a female Not that the bitches weren't affectionate, but there was just that more independent streak in my girls. But it's never a good idea to generalise - I definitely had girls who needed me, and males that didn't as much.

We started with 2 males, a year apart in age, and ended (it seems) with a male Basset.
 
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