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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
I'd say your hound is simply a red/white. The trouble is this colour thing is it's really only 'obvious' when the hound is a young puppy - in terms of what he'd be registered as. Your hound is darker than a lemon/white would be, but he doesn't have the dark facial markings a mahogany and white would have, as an adult. The last two photos look more red, than the first two too.

Similarly with tricolours, some can 'fade' to the point that when older, they have lost most, if not all the black. Case in point, coming back to the UK on a visit, I went to a show and specifically went to find the famous at the time record holder for the breed, Ch. Lodway Lancer of Islwyn. I thought he was a tricolour. Imagine my confusion when he looked more red/white than tri!!

My definite lemon/white boy, years ago, developed a glorious orangy red/white as an adult when he'd been virtually white with tan-ish splodges early days. Towards the end of his life, he went back to being almost all white.

Many lines of tricolours 'fade' when adult, unless they are 'dark tricolours' in which case even then, they do retain their black, but often their faces go grey.

Confusing eh. It's much easier at the end of the day to call three-coloured hounds tricolour, and two colour hounds, bicolour :D:eek:

ps If you compare the puppies in the litter I linked to here, with those Mikey and Miriam have posted here, you'll see the difference between the mahogany/white and the lemon/white.
 

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but he doesn't have the dark facial markings a mahogany and white would have, as an adult
Not actual true as black facial marking are the result of a black mask gene a tri or mahogany may or may or may not have. Red can have the black mask gene ass well but because the e/e gene prevent black hairs it would never show genetically. There are mahoganies that a mist named as reds all the time because it can be next to impossible to tell withoth genetic testing or knowing that mahoganies do not occur in the line. Mahogany is a dominate coat color trait.

Basset Hound Coat Color DNA Study
.The EM allele produces a melanistic (black) mask on the face that covers the muzzle and can extend up around the eyes and onto the ears. This pattern is most easily seen on Mahogany dogs, though any Basset Hound pattern may express the EM allele, except for "red and white" or "lemon and white" due to e/e.

"BB, below, was submitted for this study as a Red & White Basset Hound. Testing revealed that she is, in fact, ay/at Mahogany. No black hairs are apparent in her coat from the photograph. This could lead to confusion as, if she were bred to a black-and-tan male, she would produce approximately 50% "red" puppies (actually Mahogany) and it could be assumed that the male were carrying the e allele of MC1R, which may not be true in reality.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
"Mahogany is a dominate coat color trait."

In line with the same with tricolours. We had a male who came from mainly lemon/white bloodlines (Wingjays). He was a blanket tricolour. Back of him too were a couple of black blankets. Given his background, I always hoped for more lemon/whites (well at least one, a bitch). As it was, he only threw one (male) and although he was behind all our subsequent litters, we never had another.
 

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Mahogany is on the same gene as tri and dominate to tri.

Red &white is on the E gene and is recessive require e/e E gene is also the location of black mask. Em = black mask E= black hairs no mask e=no black

From coat color link above

The E locus has 4 alleles: EM, EG, E, and e.

The EM, E and e alleles are present in the Basset Hound breed. The E allele allows for the production of both red and black pigments, so is present with the majority of color patterns in Basset Hounds.

The Red and Lemon colors are caused by the e allele of MC1R. This is a recessive allele, so red and lemon dogs are homozygous e/e. Lemon dogs are lighter in color than Red dogs. The genetic mechanism that dilutes phaeomelanin in this instance is unknown. Absolutely no black hairs will be present on either Red or Lemon dogs.

A Locus (ASIP)
There are 4 alleles of ASIP: ay, aw, at, and a.

Basset Hounds have two of these alleles: ay and at.

Tricolor, Black Tri, Black & White

These three color terms all refer to patterns caused by the at allele of ASIP. This allele produces a pattern of black pigment over the body of the dog, with tan colored points on the legs, cheeks, eyebrows, chest, and beneath the tail. Note that white markings can obscure tan points. Ticking on white patches will indicate if the underlaying region has black or red pigment.

Black Tri and Black & White are the same pattern, though the two names are often used interchangeably within the breed. Genetically, we would classify both of these patterns as "black-and-tan".

Mahogany Basset Hounds are red, often with a few black hairs on the body or face. The overall color of Mahogany dogs tends to appear darker in color than what is seen in Red or Lemon dogs, though this is not a foolproof way of distinguishing Mahogany from Red. It is likely a result of black tipped hairs spread over the body in Mahogany dogs.

Mahogany is caused by the ay allele of ASIP, which is dominant to at.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Mahogany is on the same gene as tri and dominate to tri.

Red &white is on the E gene and is recessive require e/e E gene is also the location of black mask. Em = black mask E= black hairs no mask e=no black

From coat color link above

The E locus has 4 alleles: EM, EG, E, and e.

The EM, E and e alleles are present in the Basset Hound breed. The E allele allows for the production of both red and black pigments, so is present with the majority of color patterns in Basset Hounds.

The Red and Lemon colors are caused by the e allele of MC1R. This is a recessive allele, so red and lemon dogs are homozygous e/e. Lemon dogs are lighter in color than Red dogs. The genetic mechanism that dilutes phaeomelanin in this instance is unknown. Absolutely no black hairs will be present on either Red or Lemon dogs.

A Locus (ASIP)
There are 4 alleles of ASIP: ay, aw, at, and a.

Basset Hounds have two of these alleles: ay and at.

Tricolor, Black Tri, Black & White

These three color terms all refer to patterns caused by the at allele of ASIP. This allele produces a pattern of black pigment over the body of the dog, with tan colored points on the legs, cheeks, eyebrows, chest, and beneath the tail. Note that white markings can obscure tan points. Ticking on white patches will indicate if the underlaying region has black or red pigment.

Black Tri and Black & White are the same pattern, though the two names are often used interchangeably within the breed. Genetically, we would classify both of these patterns as "black-and-tan".

Mahogany Basset Hounds are red, often with a few black hairs on the body or face. The overall color of Mahogany dogs tends to appear darker in color than what is seen in Red or Lemon dogs, though this is not a foolproof way of distinguishing Mahogany from Red. It is likely a result of black tipped hairs spread over the body in Mahogany dogs.

Mahogany is caused by the ay allele of ASIP, which is dominant to at.
:rolleyes: Fun innit.
 

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there are many breeder that claim they have had Red and White mated to a red and white and through tri's it is impossible cant happen. Only way it can happen is if 1. there was a mixed breeding that is two sires, or One of the Red and Whites was actual a mahogany. It not that easy to tell sometimes with out an actual genetic test

If t he dog has a black mask it is mahagony and not a red and white. buy mahagany's are often describe as red and white until something shows up laeer like an unexpected tri.

I find R&W and lemon an white to be in the eye of the beholder because there s a large variety to the amount of dilution that occurs. just exactly where that deviding line is in nt clear and a doubt that even discover of the dilution gene is going to resolve the issue because it manifest itself in degrees it not absolute.

The same thing as well for longer coats and double coats, it is likely the result of more than a single gene
 

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Discussion Starter #9
It does help to know a bit about the PEDIGREES involved too - for eg. I know exactly how mahoganies came into the UK - only comparatively recently via a bitch imported from Australia. This might be more difficult in the USA because not only do you also have an Australian influence, but some long ago, came in from Russia.
 
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