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Hi, I brought Ben, my 8 1/2 month old Basset to the vet's yesterday for x-rays of his back legs. He started limping about 2 weeks ago and after a week on Rimadyl with no improvement, the vet suggested the x-rays. Upon first look at the x-rays my vet diagnosed luxating patellas, the left leg more so than the right. The Dr. wanted to look at the x-rays again this morning and will be calling me later today with his final diagnosis. He explained to me that this condition can be corrected with surgery, and that there are different kinds of surgery depending on the severity of the condition. I feel so bad for my dog, he just sits down when his legs won't work. We went from a hyper 8 month old to a total couch potato. He doesn't seem to be in any pain, doesn't yelp or cry, just won't move. His limping is the worst when he wakes up from a nap, but after he is moving for a while, you can barely tell that there is a limp. I am sorry that this is so long, has any one else been through this with their Basset? Did you go forward with the surgery? From what I have read, the sooner the problem is corrected, the better the outcome. Thanks, Martha
 

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I've not heard of this condition. Perhaps someone else has and can offer some advice. Cooter had pano as a young pup, and his condition sounds alot like your Ben's. His limp would come and go, and it was always worst when his got up from sleeping. Pano can be detected in X-Rays though, I'm sure your vet would know this. Rimadyl did help Cooter though, and pups just grow out of the pano. I'm sorry for your Ben, and hope all goes well!
 

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Unfortunately
luxating patella's
are not that uncommon in bassets.
In certain breeds that have extremely short legs such as the Basset Hound or Dachshund, patellar luxation is thought to be secondary to the abnormal shape of the femur and tibia. The curvatures of the bones in these breeds work in conjunction with the forces of the quadriceps muscles to displace the patella to the inside. Please do not misunderstand - not all members of these breeds are affected with patellar luxation, only a small portion.
Given the age of the hound and the fact that it is a male I would want to rule out Pano as the cause before going to a surgical option. Regardless of your vets recomendations I would strongly recommend a second opinion from a vet that specialize in orthopaedics

That said if the cause of the limping is Luxating Petella, billateral (effecting both legs) is more common that just a single leg. There is thought to be a strong genetic component to this condition so if you know the Breeder they should be informed. Surgery done early has a very good prognoses of success. It is far better to get the problem corrected early before any arthitis develops. I know a couple bassets currently competing in agility that had surgery done on both knees for this condition so the prognose after surgery is usually good. The simple explanation of found on web sites that the cause of Patellar Luxations is caused by a too shallow groove that the knee cap sits in is an over simplication of the problem though it is true in some cases. Often the cause is multifacited and may require quite extensive surgery to correct. From Cyber-Bibliotecha
When patellar luxations are present early in life, the major muscle groups of the thigh pull toward the inside of the leg, putting abnormal pressure on the knee joint cartilage. The result is a bowlegged stance and an abnormal pull on the patella (fig.1). Therefore, the statement \"patellar luxation is an anatomic malformation not merely of the knee but of the entire pelvic limb\"? accurately describes the complexity of a seemingly simple luxation. Thus, a number of anatomic pelvic limb deformities can lead to or result from the structural manifestation of medial patellar luxation. These include bowed legs, coxofemoral (hip) joint abnormalities, and outward rotation of the limb.
...Because there is great individual variation in the pathologic deformities seen, a graded classification of medial patellar luxation (Putnam 1968) has been formulated as a basis for recommending which type of surgical repair is most appropriate for each individual.

...The most commonly accepted surgical procedures include...
1) Deepening the trochlear groove.
2) Tightening the tissues around the joint.
3) De-rotating the femur or tibia.
4) Repositioning the patellar ligament attachment to the tibia.
The post op can be a real hardship trying to keep a young pup quite and confined without driving it or yourself insane. It is a real test of patience.

links
from the Text book of small animal orthopaedics
Patellar Luxation - Chapter 81

CANINE PANOSTEITIS - CHAPTER 49

Orange Villa Veterinary Medial luxating patella
 

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Here's a link to a fairly recent discussion of patellar luxation, and here's a reply from that thread, with a list of webpages discussing this condition.

Lateral patellar luxation is a condition where the patella (knee cap) can be moved out of position to the side of the knee, away from the midline. I have also heard what your vet told you; that patellar luxation, while surprisingly common in bassets, is not often symptomatic. If it's not symptomatic, it probably won't require treatment, but best to follow your vet's advice on this.

Having said all this, one of my bassets had symptomatic patellar luxation which required surgical repair, so there are occasional cases in bassets that *do* require treatment.

Here are some links discussing patellar luxation.

Medial and lateral patellar luxation
What is patellar luxation?
Patellar Luxation
 

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I posted in August about our Abby (who would have been 8 months then also) and was diagnosed with lateral patellar dislocation which sounds very similar. She was also said to have hip dysplasia. Well after the vets (we went to 2) had put the fear of god into us, they decided to qualify what they had just told us.

She didn't have hip dysplasia, but she was a prime candidate.
Her lateral patellar dislocation is really not as bad as it could be and, unless she does some really stupid things, she could never really notice it. This is just as well because Abby is really an active dog and loves chasing balls. The vet said that as long as she doesn't jump too much she should be fine.

Anyway, I hope that you will also discover that it may not be quite as bad as you first thought. Keeping my fingers crossed for you.

It frightened
 
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Thanks for all of the information. We still don't know what the problem is, but we are going to the University of Minnesota vets on December 17th. My vet thinks that pano is only in German Shephard dogs, and I don't know enough about it to sound intelligent enough to discuss it. I am waiting to hear back from Ben's breeder if any other puppies in his litter are affected with anything, so at least I can be headed in the right direction. Would it be smart to try and find a vet that deals a lot with Bassets? Is there such a thing? I am so glad that Ben doesn't seem to be in any pain, he sits until the back legs will go. Although this morning while he was waiting for me to get ready, he was laying on his side holding his top back leg up from his body. Is it his hips? The vet thought they might look a little displastic, nothing severe. It is so hard to try and figure out what is wrong when they can't talk. We are raising 4 kids, and while that isn't easy, this ranks right up there ont he stress meter. Any suggestions or ideas are appreciated. Thanks, Martha and Ben
 

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Perhaps a basset-friendly vet would be better. I've seen on the Dailydrool site a list of vets, perhaps one is close to your area. Bassets DO get pano! I can vouch for that, although my vet was surprised that I knew about it. We wish you the best in finding the problem and healing it. Hope your Ben is better soon!
 
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Well, I talked to my Breeder, Nancy, yesterday and she said yes, Bassets get Pano, especially her "big boys". Ben is 9 months, about 48 pounds, but his Dad, Ulysses, looks HUGE in the pictures we have seen of him. She still has 4 of Ben's littermates and one of them is limping now, too. She said that she just gives them aspirin until they get over it. The best part is that she gave me the name of a vet who is also a Basset breeder who is 15 minutes away from my house :) We have an appointment on Monday morning. I am so glad I asked you all for advise. Hopefully this vet will be able to determine exactly what is wrong with Ben's back legs before we go to the University Orthopedists in 2 weeks. Thanks again for everyone's help and suggestions. I will keep you posted. Oh, the breeder also suggested that I should switch to this more "Basset smart" vet, I think that might be a good idea. :)
 
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