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Discussion Starter #1
Mattie is currently on a diet, and I was wonder what is some low fat dog treats that we could give her while she is losing weight??? We are still giving her MilkBones and I know they are not the best thing in the world to be given her, we cut down on how many she gets but would like ideas on better options to give her. Thanks for any suggestions or ideas!!
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks!! I will try those things! I know she likes grapes, but I will give the vegts and fruit a try! I am also going to try to mix a little can pumkin in her food to see how she likes that too.
 

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Grapes are toxic to dogs, granted it often takes a lot to have any effect but I'd steer clear of them regardless. Green beans are what my vet suggested as they are very low fat but filling.

These are what I give our dogs: Wholesome Hearts

They smell delicious, like gingerbread cookies.
 

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I like bacon... *urp*
but for keeping up the girlish figure... didn't someone here say something about a dehydrator... and making sweet potato chips?
 

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low fat dog treats[/url]

Somethings to keep in mind is fat is a better energy source for dogs than charbohydrates, So most low fat treats that substute carbs for protein and fat are not helpful. Ussual the easier thing to do is simply feed less, and use the kibble you would normal feed the dog as treats as well

In theory, the cause of canine obesity is very simple. As Marty Becker, DVM and co-author of "Fitness Unleashed: A Dog and Owner's Guide to Losing Weight and Gaining Health Together," says, it's "too much food in the bowl, and not enough miles on the feet." Dogs used to have work to do and got plenty of exercise. "Now," he says, "they're born retired."

To make this work, you actually have to stick to the plan, and strictly control your dog's food intake. And that doesn't mean the eyeball method. It doesn't mean guesstimations. And it definitely doesn't mean following the recommendations on the sack of kibble; they are almost always too generous to support weight loss. No, it means measuring cups and food scales. And it means counting everything your dog eats, not just meals.

Best Weight Loss Dog Food
Most weight loss dog foods on the market are high in fiber and carbohydrates with low levels of fat and moderate amounts of protein. The high fiber levels are supposed to make your dog feel full on fewer calories, making it easier to stick to the diet. But do they?
Studies have demonstrated that neither soluble, nor insoluble fiber at levels up to 16% of dry matter have any effect on satiety in dogs.
One study did show an appetite suppressant effect when 21% of the diet consisted of fiber, but fiber levels this high might have the potential to interfere with nutrient absorption. The risk is probaly compounded when high amounts of fiber are combined with reduced calorie and fat levels, as is usually the case in weight loss dog foods.
The typical weight loss dog food provides 45-55% carbohydrate, 18-28% protein, and less than 10% fat.
Fat levels are often in the 6-8% range, which can result in dry skin and poor coat condition in addition to difficulty absorbing fat soluble vitamins.
Low fat content also tends to mean reduced palatability,

...
While fiber content typically does not promote satiety in dogs, high protein/low carbohydrate diets have been shown to make dogs feel full on less food. A meat-based, high protein, low carbohydrate weight loss formula also has the added advantage of being extremely palatable to dogs, particularly when combined with a moderate amount of fat.
The importance of satiety and palatability should not be underestimated given that the owner's perception that their dog is miserable on the diet and constantly hungry is the main reason most canine weight loss efforts fail.
As crucial as these factors are, the advantages of high protein/low carb weight loss dog foods go beyond satiety and palatability. One problem with traditional weight loss dog foods is that dogs don't just lose body fat on them; they also lose significant amounts of muscle tissue.
Loss of lean muscle mass is undesirable for a host of reasons, not least of which is the fact that it results in a lower metabolic rate, making it more difficult to maintain an ideal body weight.
Several studies have demonstrated that dogs losing weight on a high protein/low carb diet retain a substantially greater percentage of their lean muscle mass.
While traditional high fiber/carbohydrate weight loss diets can result in significant weight loss when calorie intake is severely restricted, high protein/low carb dog foods have the advantage that they require only minimal caloric restriction to produce substantial weight loss.
One study (see Reference) compared overweight dogs losing weight on a exsperimental diet providing 52% protein and 22% carbohydrate to a control group of the same breed losing weight on a traditional high carbohydrate diet supplying 28% protein and 43% carbohydrate (note that the high carb diet in this study was actually somewhat higher in protein and lower in carbs than most traditional weight loss dog foods).
Both groups had approximately the same percentage of body fat at baseline, and energy intake was reduced to 85% of maintenance calories.
After twelve weeks, the high protein group had lost over twice as much as weight as the high carbohydrate control group (10.9% of body weight vs. 4.4%). The difference was even more pronounced when looking solely at the percentage of fat mass lost: 37.7% for the high protein group vs. 6.1% for the high carb group.
The two groups initially lost weight at nearly the same pace, but the high carb group's weight loss slowed after week two and hit a plateau after the first month, while the high protein group continued losing weight steadily throughout the entire twelve week period.
Both the high carb and the high protein diet used in this study were low in fat, providing 10-11% fat and 8-9% fat respectively. Other clinical trials comparing high protein/low carbohydrate diets to traditional high carb diets have also studied only diets with low fat levels. Unfortunately I am not aware of any commercial weight loss dog foods that provide nutrient values comparable to the diet that proved so effective in the above study.
Fat is not the enemy in weight loss diet for dogs carbs are.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks MikeyT for the infomation.
I knew that Mattie should be a high fiber low Carb diet. We are measuring her food by measuring cup. I am not one to eye ball it. She is not liking being on a no can diet, which I know is the best thing ever for her. I should never have gave her can to being with cause it nothing but junk in the can food. But we did. Learning from that mistake. We have been taking her for walks, we have a huge field that she can walk in am sniff and roll around in all she wants know. The hardest part is.. it is not all that warm out yet and nobody including us wants to go out but we her sake we are. The biggest problem is I am having is figuring out what treats and bones are good for her to have. She loves MilkBones. LOVES THEM.. So I have been reading labels and trying to figure out what is best for her. As far as Green Beans and Carrots... she hates them. She makes a mess with them cause she chews and spits them out. I am going to try to mix some can pumpkin in her food tonight to see how that goes. I also a pig ear once in a while too..
It a learning as we go thing going on.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I like bacon... *urp*
but for keeping up the girlish figure... didn't someone here say something about a dehydrator... and making sweet potato chips?
Mattie likes Bacon too Esther but she is losing her girlish figure cause of it. LOL!! Sweet Potatoe chips actually sound good.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Grapes are toxic to dogs, granted it often takes a lot to have any effect but I'd steer clear of them regardless. Green beans are what my vet suggested as they are very low fat but filling.

These are what I give our dogs: Wholesome Hearts

They smell delicious, like gingerbread cookies.
Thanks Kirska, I will check into them. I didn't know about the grapes, but she only has 1 or 2 if I am having some. So I think she is good there but will keep that in mind next time I am having some!! Thanks for the suggested!!
 

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Worm wouldn't eat raw carrots at first. But he would eat them cooked when they were softer and mushier. Then after a couple months, I dropped a raw carrot on the ground one day and voila! he gobbled it up. Now he really enjoys crunching and munching on them. (don't get me wrong... he will take bacon or another meat product any day over carrots or veggies...) but he does look like he enjoys them.

One idea is to microwave or cook the carrots (I buy a bag of "baby" carrots that are ready to go...) and green beans (Worm also likes frozen peas and corn), so they are softer, and then ALSO mix them with some baby food, esp the kind with chicken or beef in them.... so there is a little meat gravy... then I'd wonder if your dog would change its mind about veggies....? just a thought...

Re: grapes:
I didn't know anything about grapes either. I grew up (awhile ago) feeding my old dog lots and lots of grapes without problems. There wasn't a warning about them back then. The warning has just come up in the past dozen years. They don't know how grapes result in kidney failure in dogs, exactly, or what's in/on them that causes it (ie. fungus? pesticide? bacteria? etc...)

I did look into it a bit, and found that although in many cases, a large quantity was ingested, in some cases, it was just a few (like 6 or 7 grapes, if memory serves). Also that in some dogs, they had eaten grapes before without problems, but that just that one incident, had an adverse reaction.

Overall, kidney failure from grapes is rare, and death is even more rare. But I did decide before I wouldn't be feeding Worm grapes anytime soon...

Anyways, here's more info in case you're interested:

Grape and raisin toxicity in dogs - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

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my humans cook sweet potatoes all the time--usually on the grill
(human side note: really easy on the grill and no mess like with the oven. also you can cook your bbq chicken or what have you at the same time. Mmmmmmm...).

But do they save any for ME Me ME? The queen of this establishment? Oh HECK no. Here Esther have a little doggie treat. Bah! Don't they knwo who I AM?

btw, my birthday is august 6th and I DANG well better be getting a tiara...
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Thanks Wworm... I am going to try to cook her some carrots and see if she likes them better. Start with carrots and go from there.
I think I will think twice before feeding Mattie Grapes too..
 

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When I lived in Florida, I would make chicken stock, low sodium, into ice cubes. It was great for when they came in from a walk on a hot day.
 

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Oh dear, thanks for the warning about grapes and raisins. Boomer has eaten both, not in large quantity, but I'll quit giving them to him.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
When I lived in Florida, I would make chicken stock, low sodium, into ice cubes. It was great for when they came in from a walk on a hot day.
That is a good idea, never thought about that. I will have to give that a go on a hot day here in VA this spring/summer.
 
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