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Not eating much today, vomited once this evening earlier...he perks up and runs around the yard with the neighbors dog, but when he comes in he goes to bed and he is shivering...
 

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The vet said shivering could be a sign of pain- Jake shivered horribly with a bad bout of pano once. Poor baby-Give him extra love from us- Wendy
 
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I called the vet and he advised me giving him an adult aspirin...he is asleep now and the shivers have subsided a bit...The doc told me the same that the shivers could be that he hurt himself running outside...
My poor baby..I got so scared...After loosing my Dad a month ago, I couldn't bear to have my doggy sick too.
 

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It is hard when they are unwell. Jake was sick a couple nights ago. He threw up twice but was very agitated- lots of gas in his tummy. I sat up with him until 3 am when he finally settled down- I was terrified of bloat. I've made numerous trips to the ER vet- probably several that could have waited until morning :( I hope your houndie is feeling better soon!
 
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Bogie had been shivering with his round of Panosteitis last week. The vet said when dogs are in pain they often shiver. He would romp outside showing no signs of pain or limping until he came inside and got still. I guess the adrenalin kicks in when they are having fun. Thankfully he is doing great now, no shivers, no limping or holding up a paw when standing. He finished his "Metacam" yesterday and we are greatful he is off that. So the meds, no romping, lots of leash time to keep him still in the house, and lots of extra hugs have done their magic.
Good luck with Louie and hope he's his perky self soon.
 

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Hope Louie's feeling better, when Daisy Jayne had pano she would shiver real hard in surges--she'd relax a moment, then shiver real hard for a moment, then relax again--as I remember, this was usually at night. She'd lay around and sleep a lot in any warm cozy spot she could find during these spells, with a few short periods of energy, but really wasn't very playful. Pano seems to hit every dog a little differently.... Keeping her warm and relaxed seemed to help her, lots of cuddles and lots of love.

It's hard to see them suffer, pano can be so uncomfortable, but I hope he feels better *real* soon.

Hugs for you and Louie! Keep us posted!
Barb
 

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My Scarlet shivered when she had a fever when she had mastitis. I guess it could have been from the pain as well. A trip to the vet may be a good idea.

CTG
 
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He laid really low today and this afternoon when I got home from work, he went to the neighbors to play with his best friend, Reilly, and he ate dinner there and a whole bowl of water...

He just came in and was barking at the cat...so I guess all is back to normal...

Never heard of Pano...what is that??
 
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CMFairygodmother: Here is some information on "Panosteitis".

Panosteitis, or Pano as it is commonly called, is a disease which affects the long bones in growing young dogs, mostly of the larger breeds, but occasionally is seen in some smaller breeds as well. German Shepherds are one of the breeds who are often presented with lameness and limb pain between 5 and 18 months of age, and many veterinarians diagnose Pano as it's cause.

The first signs of Pano are often a slight lameness in one leg, progressing to a severe limp and possibly non-use of the affected leg. It may last for days to weeks, and may seem to resolve then recur in the same leg, or another one. Some dogs can exhibit lameness in more than one, or even all legs at the same time. Often Pano shows up in a foreleg first. Bouts of lameness can come and go, seemingly for months. Some dogs suffer from Pano off and on until they are nearing 2 years of age or even beyond. I believe a case has been documented in a 5 year old dog, but that is unusual. Most cases start near the end of rapid growth, about 5 to 6 months of age, and are cleared up by 12 to 18 months of age. Males seem to be more affected than females, but both sexes can exhibit signs.

Radiographic signs, those seen on an x-ray, can be elusive when diagnosing Pano. The bones most affected are the radius and ulna (the foreleg), the humerus (upper arm), the femur (thigh) and the tibia (lower rear leg). Pano is an inflammation of the bone itself, the cortex (outer shell) becomes less distinct and foggy, and the interior of the bone seems to increase in density. Pano lesions are not always seen on an X-ray even though the dog may be showing clinical signs of lameness and pain."
 
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Thank you for that! It sure explains alot, while I didn't see him limp, it appeared he was not well...

Sometimes he comes up to my bed at night and cries...I just tell him to get in his bed, and back he goes...I wonder if he is looking for some comfort?

I do wish he could talk sometimes!
 
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