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Hi.I am looking for someone who breeds bassets in the areas of Ohio, Virginia, Pennsylvania and Delaware. I am not looking for show quality just pet quality that is AKC certified. please help. Thanks
 

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FWIW Akc does not cerrify dogs it registers them the purpose of a registry is to to imply some quality standard but rather simply insure the dogs are pure bred. In this case of most registries and AKC is no exception in this they take the reports of the breed as being accurate so the strength of the registry is only as strong as the worst breeders in it. The Akc can require DNA verification and testing in some instance to prove and perentage and a invaldiate registration based on this.

As for finding a responsible breed one option is is the BHCA breeder directory however it does tend to be dated. Another method is to attend a local dog show with AKC sponsorship. While I realize that you are not looking for a "show quality dog" any breeding rare produces a litter of all show quality dogs so breeders of show quality dogs also have pet quality ones as well. They all general pay more attention to heath and genetic issues when selecting breeding pairs than the average breeder and often the cost is less as well.

If you are looking for a performance dog ie field trial hunt etc than attending that type of show will yield better results then a confirmation show. To find local confirmation shows or field trials that are AKC sanctioned see Event and Awards Search
 

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RE: previous post on thread

Hello. I have checked the BHCA and I found some breeders but they want about $1200 for basset, and these are people who are breeding show quality dogs and happen to have pet quality. I am trying to find JUST pet quality. I know the purpose of AKC and know all about it. I am happy with getting a basset with vet certificate and AKC papers. I'm not going to breed the dog, just have it as a pet. Can anyone help with breeders at a reasonable price within the above states?? Thanks
 

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You can find breeders on the BHCA site selling for less a lot less if you try. You also have to keep in mind you general get what you pay for. With an akc show breeder there is genetic testing etc which if you search this site there are many heart wrenching storiest about bassets with genetic conditions, glaucoma, epilepsy, and bleeding disorders,

If your not hung up on a pup you can check with the local rescues as well The adoption fee is generally around 250 but does vary,

check here some are and some are not AKC registered.

FWIW a vet certificate is worthless. you;d be much better off with a reasonable return policy, and each state often has rules regarding health quarantees in regard to dog sales.
 

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What Mikey said exactly. I found R & S's breeder through the BHCA website. I called just about everyone listed in the state of Florida. 90% of the people I contacted were more than happy to chat with me, answers any questions I had. I did have my heart set on a puppy & a female but wasn't have great luck. I keep hearing the same persons named again & again. I contacted her, she didn't have any puppies. But we continued to chat and she told me about a brother & sister, one year old that she had. She asked me just about as many questions as I asked her! At first the idea didn't thrill me that they weren't puppies. But after talking for awhile I realized I could miss the chance of getting 2 dogs that were fully housetrained & obedience trained. She invited me to her place and the rest is history. It was a perfect match. I started off definitely wanting a puppy. SO GLAD I got my R & S instead! She gave the me the best gift by parting with those 2!
 

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Hello. I have checked the BHCA and I found some breeders but they want about $1200 for basset, and these are people who are breeding show quality dogs and happen to have pet quality. I am trying to find JUST pet quality. I know the purpose of AKC and know all about it. I am happy with getting a basset with vet certificate and AKC papers. I'm not going to breed the dog, just have it as a pet. Can anyone help with breeders at a reasonable price within the above states?? Thanks
Actually that 1200 dollars price is quite reasonable for the pet quality offered by well respected breeders.
I just got a puppy from one respected breeder... and I cannot tell you what a great experience it was. The puppy is very healthy, very well behaved, social, confident, and mentally stable for his age, and best of all, he is already potty trained -he whimpers when he want to relieve himself and signal you to open the door for him instead of just doing it there.
There are many positive instances when we walked him to the park. Couple of aggressive dogs and misbehaving dogs were there and try to provoke my puppy. But, he ignored all of them and stay calm. In the end, the aggressive dogs became calm as well.

And, since the breeder isn't really in the making money business, she gave me tons of stuff (toys, 1 huge bag of puppy foods, ear cleaning solution, crate pad, leash, bowls, tooth paste, chewing toys, play toys, toothbrush, etc) for free. At the end of the day, it seemed to me that she did not get any profit from that 1500 dollars I gave her.
She told me that since she own a pet supply and boutique store, i will always get 25% off of anything bought from her store, free pet sitter service, and free grooming services. She truly loves her dogs. I would recommend her to you.. But, she is in California and I don't think she will be ok with shipping her puppies.

I really recommend getting one from the breeder. They breed their puppy for the best standard as far as looks, genetics, and behaviors.

If you think that price is too expensive, I think you should consider adopting a rescue basset.
Please do not buy from puppy mills.. My roommate got her dog for 150 dollars in front of home depot.. and she ended up spending about 25,000 dollars to correct her dog's health problem (glaucoma, skin condition, ear infection, allergies, etc).

I think if you really want a puppy, it is better to spend a bit more than to spend tons of money at later stage.
 

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I'm a breeder -- listed on the BHCA web site. I breed for conformation and charge a high price for my pet quality pups. Having a litter is expensive -- the x-rays/ultrasounds to confirm pregnancy, puppy check-ups and shots, worming -- not to mention the food they eat! We plan our breedings carefully, keeping the breed standard in mind. We socialize our puppies, climbing into that whelping box from the time they're very small, holding and handling them, teaching them that people are a good thing, not to be feared or mistrusted. We place them in homes we believe will be good ones, where these pups will be cared for and loved. And we will always take one of our pups back, no matter how old they are (I know breeders who have taken back 8 and 9-year-old dogs whose owners couldn't take care of them any more). I've only got one brood bitch, she had pups in Oct. and won't be bred again for at least another year. Of her seven pups, four are going to be shown (one of them by me). I found wonderful homes in New York for two of the pups, and I still have one that I'm trying to sell. She's seven months old and deserves her own couch, but I won't let her go unless I feel the home is truly a good one: fenced yard, vet care as necessary, an understanding of the hound persona, etc., etc. I'm charging a lot, but the time and effort I've put into this litter makes them worth every penny. It's a heavy responsibility to have puppies, to place them in good homes; it's something I take very seriously. I'm not doing this for the money. In fact, I'm not even going to break even on this litter, and it was a totally uncomplicated pregnancy and delivery. But I'm doing this to better the breed.

So -- keep this in mind when comparing the price of puppies. And remember that you do get what you pay for.....
 

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We just went through the whole finding a breeder thing, looking for a reasonably priced, good quality, not for show pups. we ended up driving from florida to TN and are very happy with our pups. Appalachian Big Foot Basset Hounds

A couple others that looked good and we considered are. in NC longearedhounds - Home of the Hushpuppy Dogs! in VA Huckleberry Mountain Bassets - AKC Lemon & White and Tri-Color Bassets. Although we have no experience with either of those.

We went with Appalachian Bassets after talking to Angie, she seemed very nice and doing her best to take proper care of her dogs, and her prices were reasonable. Also two of her adults (one male and one female) were rescued from Puppy mills that were mistreating them.

When we picked the two we wanted from her pics, do to scheduling we were unable to pick them up at 8 weeks, and didn't get up there until they were 11 weeks old. Angie did not ask for a penny more for her trouble.

here is a thread with a pic of our two babies at 4 months.. Zatarra is the black blanket tri, and Mercedes is the red and white. www.basset.net/boards/general-basset-hound-discussion/12466-whos-couch-do-you-think.html
 

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I'd also have to say $1200 isn't bad for a puppy from a reputable breeder. No reputable breeder has a litter just to produce pet quality puppies. The whole purpose in breeding is to better the breed whether it be in terms of conformation, temperament, hunting ability or other health-wise. A good breeder is going to do the tests that are recommended because they have taken the time to show their dogs in the ring to know that they are of the quality that should be bred. They pour over pedigrees for hours on end to try and find the perfect match and they meet these prospective studs to see if they have the traits that they need to improve in their dogs. Breeding is an expensive and sometimes heartbreaking hobby that few people make money at if they do it right. I can tell you we learned the hard way the difference between buying through a reputable breeder and the others who call themselves breeders. If you are curious you can go to my website and read my story as I won't rehash it here. Sufice it to say we lost our first girl from a so called breeder at a very young age and since then have gotten a (show) puppy from a reputable breeder and while the intial cost for our show girl may have been significantly higher she is everything we hoped for and more and she is worth every penny. She is the most well grounded, even tempered dog I have ever met and has been the healthiest dog we have ever owned as well so while she may have costed us more to start with... she's saved us more than the other two combined in the short 4 years that we've owned her. She is worth every penny we paid for her and more.
 

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I'd also have to say $1200 isn't bad for a puppy from a reputable breeder. No reputable breeder has a litter just to produce pet quality puppies. The whole purpose in breeding is to better the breed whether it be in terms of conformation, temperament, hunting ability or other health-wise. A good breeder is going to do the tests that are recommended because they have taken the time to show their dogs in the ring to know that they are of the quality that should be bred. They pour over pedigrees for hours on end to try and find the perfect match and they meet these prospective studs to see if they have the traits that they need to improve in their dogs. Breeding is an expensive and sometimes heartbreaking hobby that few people make money at if they do it right. I can tell you we learned the hard way the difference between buying through a reputable breeder and the others who call themselves breeders. If you are curious you can go to my website and read my story as I won't rehash it here. Sufice it to say we lost our first girl from a so called breeder at a very young age and since then have gotten a (show) puppy from a reputable breeder and while the intial cost for our show girl may have been significantly higher she is everything we hoped for and more and she is worth every penny. She is the most well grounded, even tempered dog I have ever met and has been the healthiest dog we have ever owned as well so while she may have costed us more to start with... she's saved us more than the other two combined in the short 4 years that we've owned her. She is worth every penny we paid for her and more.
You are making sweeping generalizations about breeders just because they do not show which are not necessarily true. I do know a bit about showing, breeding and being a serious breeder. I use to show and breed beagles, (to much work, I do not show or breed anymore) and my sister has been showing and breeding labs now for over 20 years.

There is definitely a space in between puppy mill and serious show breeder, if you do not like it that is your prerogative, but to say they have no purpose is bit too self-righteous for my taste.

And I won't even get into how, depending on the tastes of certain "serious breeding groups" show quality dog are actually bred away from the original qualities that made them the breed they are.
 

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Well you have your opinion and I have mine. That is why they are called opinions and everyone is entitled to one.
 

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Well you have your opinion and I have mine. That is why they are called opinions and everyone is entitled to one.
True that, but it might help if you stated your opinions as opinions, not as if they were facts.

By your definition of a reputable breeders, not one dog I've ever owned was from a reputable breeder. And I had one sweet 13in show quality beagle many years ago.
 

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Finding a breeder challenge

Finding a "reputable" affordable breeder is not easy. While I have made a vow not to make a quick/unethical purchase from a puppy mill. I'm not feeling like it's necessary for me to spend thousands of dollars on a pet that I have no intention of putting in a show ring. There has to be something in between that is acceptable but I have to tell you................that is hard to find!

I have faith that there is a basset out there somewhere just for me..........my basset quest has become quite an adventure. Meeting lots of interesting people and wonderful bassets along the way!

One thing is for sure, I'm storing up lots of love and when I finally bring my new basset home, she will be cherished and cared for like my child.
My heart and home is open..............I'm still searching.
 

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True that, but it might help if you stated your opinions as opinions, not as if they were facts.

By your definition of a reputable breeders, not one dog I've ever owned was from a reputable breeder. And I had one sweet 13in show quality beagle many years ago.
You are right my definition of a reputable breeder is high. However I feel that there are far too many dogs out there in shelters and rescues for it to be done any other way. I was duped into buying from someone who didn't fit those standards the first time, someone who just produced pets and we lost that first dog to cancer at 3 1/2 and felt the heartbreak that goes along with it so yes I feel very strongly in my view that you either do it right or you don't do it at all. I try every day to keep others from making that same mistake I made, to try and save them the pain and agony of losing one so young.
 

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You are right my definition of a reputable breeder is high. However I feel that there are far too many dogs out there in shelters and rescues for it to be done any other way. I was duped into buying from someone who didn't fit those standards the first time, someone who just produced pets and we lost that first dog to cancer at 3 1/2 and felt the heartbreak that goes along with it so yes I feel very strongly in my view that you either do it right or you don't do it at all. I try every day to keep others from making that same mistake I made, to try and save them the pain and agony of losing one so young.

While I agree that there are far too many dogs in shelters, I don't see where that has anything to do with what standards one considers to be required for a breeder to be reputable. And you sort of defeat your own argument by stating that helping to find a reputable breeder is to try and save people from the pain of losing a dog young. Fact is pure bred dog, do the the in breeding, even in reputable lines, to get the "Best quality dog" have many more health issues and shorter life expectancies than mixed breed dogs. Dogs That Changed the World - Selective Breeding Problems - Genetics | Nature
 

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While I agree that there are far too many dogs in shelters, I don't see where that has anything to do with what standards one considers to be required for a breeder to be reputable. And you sort of defeat your own argument by stating that helping to find a reputable breeder is to try and save people from the pain of losing a dog young. Fact is pure bred dog, do the the in breeding, even in reputable lines, to get the "Best quality dog" have many more health issues and shorter life expectancies than mixed breed dogs. Dogs That Changed the World - Selective Breeding Problems - Genetics | Nature
The problem is all this hubbub about hybrid vigor has absolutely no way of being proven, show me the statistics of where they have run long term studies on any line of hybrids so that they can truly be compared with some of the well bred purebreds and then maybe I'll buy it but till then it's just heresay.

My breeders dogs routinely live to the ages of 15 and 16 and she practices some line breeding and some outcrossing, tell me how many bassets do you know of that are living much longer than that? She has years of experience in the breed and knows what she is doing and with all of her years of experience knows what sort of health and temperament issue reside in any line that she has produced. Tell me how many of these designer breed dogs who can say that, who know their pedigrees backwards and forwards and know what sort of issues they need to be striving to rid the breed of? I bet you I can count them on one hand.

Yes there are some breeders who have bred dogs to have such exagerated features so as to cause many problems. However line breeding and inbreeding are very helpful tools in the hands of someone who knows what they are doing and can help to rid the breed of many of it's health issues. This also goes along with testing, trailing and competing in various venues and knowing what your lines strengths and weaknesses are.
 

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". . . Steven N. Austad, PhD, a professor and researcher on aging at the Department of Cellular and Structural Biology at the University of Texas Health Science Center in San Antonio, says besides looking at small dogs, people looking for the longest-lived dogs also should look at mixed breed dogs and females.
"Female dogs tend to live a bit longer, although it's not as pronounced as it is with humans," Austad says.
Many purebred dogs come with a laundry list of health issues, which can cut into their life spans. Some are specific just to one breed, others can be a problem in many breeds.
"Mutts haven't gone through the inbreeding, so they should live longer, or at least be healthier than your purebred dogs," Austad says. . . "

Perhaps if people still bred dogs for just for their original purposes, mostly hunting and working, it might be different. But most pure bred dogs today are bred for an on paper standard, which is correct only in the eyes of the of the kennel club executives that wrote it, not even necessarily in the eyes of the rest of the members of the club.

There seems to be a fair amount of contention just in the basset organizations as to whether the current conformation standard is correct or if the trend toward bigger, bulkier, and floppier has reduced their ability to do what they were first bred for. I perfer smaller lighter bassets myself, even though I no longer hunt. And don't see how breeding for bigger is a good thing, as it is statistically show that smaller dogs also live longer.
 

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". . . Steven N. Austad, PhD, a professor and researcher on aging at the Department of Cellular and Structural Biology at the University of Texas Health Science Center in San Antonio, says besides looking at small dogs, people looking for the longest-lived dogs also should look at mixed breed dogs and females.
"Female dogs tend to live a bit longer, although it's not as pronounced as it is with humans," Austad says.
Many purebred dogs come with a laundry list of health issues, which can cut into their life spans. Some are specific just to one breed, others can be a problem in many breeds.
"Mutts haven't gone through the inbreeding, so they should live longer, or at least be healthier than your purebred dogs," Austad says. . . "

Perhaps if people still bred dogs for just for their original purposes, mostly hunting and working, it might be different. But most pure bred dogs today are bred for an on paper standard, which is correct only in the eyes of the of the kennel club executives that wrote it, not even necessarily in the eyes of the rest of the members of the club.

There seems to be a fair amount of contention just in the basset organizations as to whether the current conformation standard is correct or if the trend toward bigger, bulkier, and floppier has reduced their ability to do what they were first bred for. I perfer smaller lighter bassets myself, even though I no longer hunt. And don't see how breeding for bigger is a good thing, as it is statistically show that smaller dogs also live longer.
Hmm... once again you have shown no statistical proof of this hybred vigor. Your quote clearly states that these mutts "SHOULD LIVE LONGER". I can tell you I've seen many mutts with just as many health issues as any other dog. And as for smaller dogs living longer statistically ... well smaller breeds yes I'll give you that one but there is no such statistic that says smaller bassets live longer than larger ones. Do I believe that the bassets should be kept in decent condition and in proper weight, ABSOLUTELY and yes I have seen many bassets in the ring who could stand to lose a few pounds, one of them being my girl, but I'm talking a pound or two in her case. However I can show you several 60 lb. bassets (in perfect weight) who are fine examples of the standard who have lived to 15 and 16 years old.

Here's one who died not long ago at 15 1/2.

This is Kenni years ago while she was being shown:


I believe this picture of Kenni is from last summer:


This is picture of her was taken recently before she died:
 

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And as for smaller dogs living longer statistically ... well smaller breeds yes I'll give you that one but there is no such statistic that says smaller bassets live longer than larger ones.
One, I never said smaller bassets out live larger ones. When I said smaller dogs, I meant breeds.

And as far as statistical evidence, you can't show my any that says mutts don't live longer either. There isn't any.

But in my experience as someone that bred dogs, and has family members that breed, (my father bred hunting dogs, my kid sister has been a reputable professional breeder for over 20 years, actually rated in the top 10 in the nation by AKC a few years back), and as someone who has owned and been around many dogs both mutts and pure bred for many years, the empirical evidence to me is overwhelming. We have had many mutts live near or over 20 years, not so with pure bred dogs.
 

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One, I never said smaller bassets out live larger ones. When I said smaller dogs, I meant breeds.

And as far as statistical evidence, you can't show my any that says mutts don't live longer either. There isn't any.

But in my experience as someone that bred dogs, and has family members that breed, (my father bred hunting dogs, my kid sister has been a reputable professional breeder for over 20 years, actually rated in the top 10 in the nation by AKC a few years back), and as someone who has owned and been around many dogs both mutts and pure bred for many years, the empirical evidence to me is overwhelming. We have had many mutts live near or over 20 years, not so with pure bred dogs.
So you've just made my point for me. We're going to have to agree to disagree here as I will still go for a well bred dog who's pedigree and health history I can research over a mutt any day. No pedigree evidence or health history you are going to be able to find in any database on a mutt. That's all I'm saying...
 
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