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My nine and a half month old Basset, Ernest, started limping early this week. He's not in any pain and the lameness seems to have moved from his rear left leg to his front right leg. I've read on the net that this could be growing pains and nothing to be overly concerned about. Any advice?

Sally
 

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FWIW Pano is extremely painfull it must be remembered most dogs are stoic when it comes to pain.

Pano is just one of a number of cause of fore-limb limping in basset who also suffer at a higher percentage than the general population from a myriad elbow problem generically called Elbow dysplasia. Only way to be sure is a vet vist perferrably a orthopeadist with experience in basset hound and maybe a couple second opinions as well.

check out the BHCA- Health links on both
 

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Thanks for the info. I'm assuming its pano because it started in his left hind leg last Monday. He's not as mobile as usual which makes me think he is in some pain, so it's off to the vet.
 

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The vet is probably the best place to start... but if surgery is the recomendation I would strongly recommend either a second opinion or a referral to a surgeon with experience with bassets. Let us know how he does :)
 

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Hi, I'm new here. I also have a 9 mo. old basset. Daisy began limping the 2nd of October, just out of the blue--she was walking thru the living room and suddenly yelped and cried fit to bring the house down. I got on the floor and she curled up in my lap and cried. We checked the paw she was holding up and found no visible injury, there was nothing in the carpet to hurt her, like a tack or sandburr. Her brother began limping appx. a week or two before that. My boss owns her brother so we frequently compare notes. Flash and Daisy both went off their feed, were subdued, favoring one foot or the other, laying around a lot, and shivering at night. Flash's owner went to a vet who said it was pano and gave him some sort of pain relievers and he's really bounced back. I took my Daisy to a different vet for spaying and asked about the limping and he told us she was eating the wrong puppy chow and needed the kind he sells, naturally--Science Diet. Plus vitamin supplements. Ooooookaaay.... ;)

Well, we decided to give it a little more time because it frankly didn't make a lot of sense to us, and she is coming out of it, she still favors her right front paw a little, and she's playing rough again. I did change her food, but only because she stopped eating her old food after spaying. I was trying to tempt her to eat because her appetite really sloped off, and of course we wanted her to keep her strength up after the procedure. She's really going at her new food now, seems to really enjoy it and not having any intestinal problems from the change. I did not use the food the vet sells, tho it is a good brand; I switched her from Iams to Beneful.

So I honestly can't say it was the diet that made her limp or not. In my heart I really think it is pano, because I find it odd that she and her brother exhibited the same symptoms at the same time. We were concerned that it might be genetic, but I no longer think there's any problem--I think we have two very fast growing pups who just can't keep up with themselves. ;)

I hope your dog is doing better, too!

BarbR
 

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Ernest is better. I went to Petsmart and bought him some beef flavored chewable aspirin (the most expensive aspirin in the world, I imagine). The aspirin seemed to help. For a few days he did seem to be in such bad pain that I limited his movements, carrying him to the park for a brief visit with his dog friends. He also shivered and was off of his food.

Happily, at some point last week-end the limping completely stopped. I also switched to a puppy food for large breds as what I've read says that the high amounts of calcium in regular puppy foods may cause the bones to grow too fast which causes the problem.
 

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high amounts of calcium in regular puppy foods may cause the bones to grow too fast which causes the problem.


FWIW the difference in calcium level between regular puppy food and those designed for large breed is minimal. Studies on calcium level and orthopeadic problems have been done with high level of calcium level only obtained by supplimentaion. Also no studies link pano with high calcium level, HOD, OCD mostly are link to high calium levels and/or improper phosphate/calcium ratio but not pano which still there is no cure.

On other note on pano. It is not nearly as common in females as it is in males. Upwards of 80% of sufferers are male.
 

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Help here too.. Lucy just started limping last night and it seemed more pronounced this morning. Off to the vet.. who said it could be 3 things.. (mind you she hasn't fallen to my knowledge). Pano.. torn ACL or part of her knee (the triagle part) has separated from the long bones. There's a name for it but darned if I can remember. It's her right hind leg. He wanted to charge me $490 for 2 xrays (to compare left to right knee) $50 to sedate her, $54 for the exam.. need I say more. I left in tears with her receiving a shot of pain med and medicine for the week. He says if it's PANO she should be better by Monday. If not, we need to pay the $490 only to find out WHAT IS WRONG. Then the orthopedic doc for surgery. I love my baby, but I feel this is extreme.. Second opinion? I read a post here recommending that. I do not have $500 for a diagnosis.. all I'm doing is crying and trying to comfort my Lucy.
 

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Consider enforcing strict crate rest. The meds will mask her pain, and if she's allowed normal activity, she could worsen an underlying injury like a torn ACL.

I had a basset with patellar luxation (slipped kneecap). When the kneecap was out of position, she would tuck the leg up underneath her and refuse to put any weight on it. When the kneecap had popped back into position, she used the leg with no problem. Sometimes, dogs with this problem try kicking the leg out behind them, as if they're trying to pop the kneecap back into position.

A trial of conservative therapy (strict crate rest, anti-inflammatories) can be tried for some cases of torn ACL. OTOH, if the problem is patellar luxation, surgery is indicated to prevent arthritis.
 

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My Ernest is going to the vet today as well. He's limping and picking up his front paw. He's okay with us touching it, but its a bit worrisome.

He has puppy manners class today and I don't want him overexerting him.

Keep Ernest the puppy in your thoughts.

lala
 

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Vet thinks E. dd has pano as well.

He rejected his morning zuke, so he must not be feeling well.
 

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Jake had pano as a pup but finally outgrew (hopefully) around 18 months. When it flared we did the rest and a pain med/antii nflammatory the vet gave us. The episodes did not seem to last terribly long ( days to less than a week) but were very painful- in fact entailing a trip to the ER vet late one night because of pain.

Another basset we had several years ago had the same symptoms. We did do the xrays but the final outcome was the same. They suspected pano and we did the rest/medication routine for flares- He outgrew it as well. One vet called it pano- the other (more country and laid back) said "growing pains"

Good luck with all your limping babies. It is no fun when they hurt!
 

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so, the vet gave ernest deramaxx which seems like overkill for a 5 month puppy.

I'm really hesitant to start him on the road to this at his young age if something like buffered aspirin will work.

any thoughts?

lala
 

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Lady is on aspirin for her dysplasia and arthritis, and it seems to work as well as Rimadyl.

she was on Rimadyl, but seemed to be having some odd problems, so I switched her to aspirin, against my vet's wishes. then, Lady had a serious bout with a peculiar thing called Old Dog Vestibular Disease (or Syndrome). even though there's absolutely no evidence the Rimadyl caused the vestibular disorder, Rimadyl can cause vestibular and neurological problems, so now the vet won't even let me think of giving her anything but aspirin.

but Lady's a German Shepherd. i think German Shepherds have very very weird wiring and are always seeming to have weird stuff like this happen to them. bassets, IMO, are much sturdier neurologically and i've never heard of a basset having these kinds of problems with Deramaxx and the like.

i would talk to your vet. fortunately, Lady tolerates aspirin really well, but some dogs don't and i know many people whose dogs can't take it.

in addition, because it can thin blood, your vet will need to know if you switch to aspirin, as it could be a problem if there were ever need of emergency surgery or if she were ever seriously cut, etc.

it is, however, a viable option which, if you're uneasy about the Deramaxx, you should investigate.
 

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ernest deramaxx which seems like overkill for a 5 month puppy
deramax is actual safer for most dogs than buffered asprin. Dogs are much more suscepetable to gastric ulceration from nsaids than humans.

Warning Concerning Arthritis Medications -- All Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs Can Kill Notes by Bob Rogers, DVM, Critter Fixer Pet Hospital, Spring, TX

Rimadyl, Etogesic, Dermaxx, Metacam and Zubrin all belong to a class of drugs called non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). The action of these drugs is similar to aspirin, in that they inhibit inflammatory substances called prostaglandins (PGEs), which cause pain, inflammation, and fever. These drugs are safer than aspirin because they are more selective for the harmful prostaglandins -- COX 2 PGEs -- and spare certain prostaglandins -- COX 1 PGEs -- which are essential to protect the G.I. tract, kidneys and other organs.  

...Relief from pain by NSAIDs is an individual response. If your pet does not get adequate relief from pain and return to normal function with one NSAID, it is worth trying a different NSAID.  

Reactions to NSAIDs are comparable. If your pet has an adverse reaction to one NSAID, another NSAID should not be used. Another cClass of pain reliever drugs should be used.
 

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Very interesting MikeyT. I'm going to forward this thread to my TH.

Ernest seems to be limping less and that is heartening. I'm afraid that its going to spread to another appendage soon and we get to start all over again.

lala
 
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