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Hi
I've got a 9 month old Basset - Lottie. Last weekend she started to limp on her right front leg. I piut it down to a sprain as it wasn't hot and no obvious sign of injury. She was still bouncing around and it didn't seem to be causing her concern. It went away after a few days rest.
Today she is limping on her left rear leg. She doesn't want to put weight on it, but she is a bit subdued today. This is now concerning me and I was wondering if this is Pano. I know Pano affects large breed puppies and was wondering if anyone has had Pano affect their puppy?
 

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I wish I could help you but none of my pups has ever had this issue. Hopefully someone with more experience will chime in. But I have heard of people with bassets that have had pano so it maybe what it is. If it continues i would take her to the vet then you would know for sure.
 

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Many vets do not realize the prevelence of the problem in basset and look to surger for elbow inconguites etc for a condition that in the end is self resolving. It easily can be Pano., x-ray may be able to confirm this with typical mottling but it does not alway show up. On of the better diagnostic tools is to queeze the long bones in the leg she is limping on in the middle to look for any indicaion of pain. The middle of the bone not the joint is where the pain in Pano originate and this is not typical of anything else. Not advocating self diagnostic but Pano is often misdiagnosed in the breed for something more serious.

Pano in basset
Paneosteitis Sometimes referred to as "growing pains" or "pano", occurs as a rotating lameness, usually in puppies up to 18 months. Many veterinarians are not aware that this is prevalent in basset hounds and will sometimes misdiagnose it, often with costly and unneeded surgery options. Pano IS prevalent in basset hounds as we've seen many, many of our members' hounds diagnosed with this over the years.
The following is from the Basset Hound Faq by Judy Trenck:
Paneosteitis is an elusive ailment occasionally seen in young Bassets. It is also known as wandering or transient lameness. Attacks are usually brought on by stress and aggravated by activity, and up to now, the cause and the cure are unknown. This mysterious disease causes sudden lameness, but its greatest potential danger may lie in false diagnosis, resulting in unnecessary surgery. A puppy will typically outgrow it by the age of two with no long term problems. It can be quite minor, or so bad that the dog will not put any weight on the leg. Symptoms may be confused with "elbow displasia", "hip displasia", "patellar luxation" and other more serious disorders. The most definite way to diagnose paneosteitis is radiographically. Even with this, signs can be quite minimal and easily missed. As to treatment, no cure was found in experimental tests and the only helpful thing found was relief for pain (aspirin, cortisone, etc.) However, using these, the dog tends to exercise more and thereby aggravate the condition. Note again: A GREAT MANY VETS ARE UNAWARE OF THIS DISEASE IN THE BASSET .
In diagnosing the cause of a Basset's lameness, a radiograph of the forelimbs may indicate a condition called elbow incongruity. (Elbow incongruity is a poor fit between the 3 bones which comprise the elbow joint.) Studies to date indicate that elbow incongruity is normal in the Basset and is not the cause of the lameness. It is also suspected that many of the previously mentioned unnecessary (panosteitis) surgeries have been performed on Basset Pups just because radiographs that were taken showed elbow incongruity.
The one argument against pano is the sex of the dog Pano affect males by a 4 to 1 margin also the speed of the transistion. Ussually the time frame for pano on a single limb is 2 to three weeks
Pano from Textbook of Small Animal Orthopaedics
Canine panosteitis is a disease that affects only large or giant breeds, most often the German shepherd, although it has been reported in the bassett hound, Scottish terrier, Great Dane, St. Bernard, Doberman pinscher, German shorthaired pointer, Irish setter, Airedale, golden retriever, Labrador retriever, Samoyed, and miniature schnauzer.(1,4,9,10,12,14,17) Males are affected more commonly than females(1,5,10) (reported range 67%(6) to 84%(10)). The disease cycle in the long bones of males is more predictable and repeatable. The female usually has her first episode in association with her first estrus.(20)

...The initial presenting complaint is usually an acute onset of lameness persisting for 2 to 14 days(1,4,20) with no current history of trauma. The disease begins in the bones of the forelegs, with the ulna being affected most often (42%), followed by the radius (25%), humerus (14%), femur (11%), and tibia (8%). The severity of these attacks becomes reduced and the interval between successive episodes increased with advancing age.(22) The degree of lameness usually increases during the first few days of an attack, remaining unaffected by either rest or exercise.(5) Periods of lameness are often accompanied by anorexia and lethargy. There may be a spontaneous regression of signs within 3 to 4 days with or without therapy,(22,23) however, more commonly the lameness is noted to shift from one limb to another every 2 to 3 weeks,(2,9,23) with occasional lapses of one month between episodes.4 In general, the pattern is from front limb to hind limb to recur again in the forelimb.(20) Recurrence of the disease in a previously affected bone is seemingly rare;(2,22) however, in chronic cases the repeated occurrence of lesions can be found in the radius, followed by the ulna, with fewer repeats in the humerus and femur. The length of the cycle of disease is 90 days, but in some cases it extends to 160 to 190 days
 

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I think my pup Virga had this at one point. She was limping but it didn't seem to be in her joints because the vet manipulated all her joints VERY strenuously with no sound from her. He put her on strict crate rest with anti-inflammatory meds and said if she's still limping by the middle of next week to bring her back in. But after the crate rest she wasn't limping anymore! Now if she starts limping on one foot, I'll put her in the crate for the rest of the day so she can rest and she seems fine! Good luck with it and if it persists I'd take her in just to double check. But take surgery suggestions with a grain of salt.
 
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