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I am pretty worried :( about my Ace face. He is normally always wagging his tail, has it sticking up in the air and is always so full of life. The last couple of days, his tail has been done, almost between his legs. He will wag it some, but won't stick it up in the air. His tail used to go crazy and would always hit things when he wagged it. I'm worried. Is it broken, sprained or is this normal in Basset Hounds? He is still pretty young, just turned 3 about 2 weeks ago.

Thanks for any and all responses I get!
 

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Maybe he's just not feeling "right". Has his food or anything changed? Has he gotten into something he shouldn't have? I don't think a call or maybe a visit to the vet would be out of place here. Does he still seem like his normally happy self besides the tail?
 

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We had two different experiences with tail injuries. One time the tip of Lucy's tail got caught in the car door by one of my children. Oh they felt so terrible about the accident. No skin was broken but her tail had a crooked bend that straightened out in a few weeks. Another time she was rough housing with the boys and kind of fell backwards and her tail got bent the wrong way. It was sprained and she lost her wag. I was so upset to that she couldn't communicate with us by tail but thankfully it did heal within a few weeks.
 

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His eating habits haven't changed at all. He gets excited when we come in the door, but doesn't seem as excited as he used to. I don't know if it's b/c of his tail or what. My bf thinks I'm crazy, but I know there is something wrong with his tail
 

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Whenever I was worried about a health issue, I would, at the very least, call the VET. He (the VET) would recommend an office visit, the wait & see w/what to watch for symptom list. That would give me peace of mind that I was offering appropriate care. Because they can't talk and tell you what is bothering them, it's difficult to determine.
 

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He lets us touch/grip his tail with no problem. He doesn't act like it's hurting or bothering him at all. My bf says we should wait another day or two to see if it gets back to normal. I hate seeing his tail down, b/c it's always on the move. If it is sprained, will it heal and get back to normal?
 

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There is a condition commonly known as ''Swimmers Tail'' that can affect many breeds.
It often occurs after the dog has been in water but not always.The tail usually hangs down in an inverted U shape.
It is a painful condition but they normally recover after a few days.

One other thought is an anal gland problem.
 

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It sounds as if he is somewhat depressed which may mean he is not feeling well. Just to be safe a vet should give him an examination. Bassets are very stoic when it comes to pain. They are very good at not reacting to pain except in severe cases.
 

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There is a condition commonly known as ''Swimmers Tail'' that can affect many breeds
Other names include Limber tail, cold tail, dead tail etc. In gerneral It is now thought to be a muscle problem. The muscles in the tail are resticted by the spine and tighter ligmanent and skin. When they expand for to much heat or over excersion or sundenly constrict it can reduce blood flow creating damage and swelling. The tail usual sticks out horizontial from the butt 1 or two verterbrea to a couple of inches then point strain down close to the body. Often there is a lump swelling at this point on the tail and it is often quite painful. Most dog recover with rest and possibly anti-infamitories like nsaids. While not common I have had a female basset my only swimmer develop this once. Keep in mind many vets are not aware of this syndrome as it is generally a hunting dog problem.

here is more details

What is Limber Tail Syndrome?
The typical case consists of a young adult dog which acutely develops a flaccid tail. The tail either hangs down from the tail base, or is held horizontally for 3 or 4 inches and then drops down. With this low tail set, the dog is eliminated from competition. Palpation around the base of the tail may elicit a pain response. Owners of Labrador Retrievers have remarked that their dogs seem very uncomfortable and appear to be in pain during the acute stages. Treatment consists of rest, and dogs recover spontaneously. Complete recovery occurs within 2 weeks, often within a few days. About one third of dogs experience a recurrence later in training. Various ages of dogs can be affected, with ages ranging from 6 months to 9 years. Most frequent age of onset in Pointers is 2 years.
How to Identify Limber Tail Syndrome in a Dog

Getting a handle on Limber Tail

It wasn't something you learned about in veterinary school. Old timers called it cold water tail because episodes most often were associated with wet and cold weather."

...The three most common causes for limber tail are climate changes, especially exposure to wet, cold weather, underconditioning or overexertion, and being confined in a crate for long periods of time," Steiss says. Veterinarians tend to see limber tail in sporting dogs during certain seasons. It commonly is seen in retrievers and pointers as they start back into heavier training in the fall or in young dogs out for the first time that come down with limber tail from overuse of the tail muscles."
Though limber tail is rare in the dog population as a whole, it is common in hard-training pointing and retrieving dogs and has been reported in Labrador, Golden and Flat-Coated Retrievers, English Setters, English Pointers, Beagles and Foxhounds.¹ Males as well as females are affected

...-ray images of the tails showed no fractures or other abnormalities of the spine. "This combination of findings - elevated CK with a normal X-ray - suggested a problem that is muscular in nature, without involvement of the bony structures of the tail," Steiss says.
Other testing included thermography, a special heat-sensing camera that detects differences in an animal's body temperature. This identified one of the most striking abnormalities," Steiss says. "Dogs affected with limber tail showed significant 'cold zones' in their tails several inches from the tail base. Temperatures in the affected portion of the tail were 2 to 3 degrees Celsius cooler than normal. These cold zones likely represent local areas where swelling after the injury has caused a decrease in blood flow."
Electromyography (EMG) was used to assess the electrical impulses conducted by nerves passing through a select group of muscles. "Abnormal electrical activity was observed in the muscles of the base of the tail of dogs with limber tail," Steiss says. "Biopsies showed microscopic evidence of muscle damage. The muscle group most
severely affected was the intertransversarius ventralis caudalis. These are the muscles used in lateral flexion (side-to-side motion) or wagging of the tail."
"Based on this study, we concluded that limber tail syndrome is associated with damage to the tail muscles," Steiss says. Ultimately, the results of the tests suggested that limber tail appears to be linked to a general condition called ischemia, meaning a lack of blood flow, and in this case to the muscles of the tail," Steiss says.
"The tail muscles are located in a small space surrounding the tail bones, and the entire tail has an outer layer of dense connective tissue. Because bone and dense connective tissue are inflexible tissues, they cannot stretch to accommodate the swelling of the muscle," she explains. "From the pointer who completes a lengthy weekend hunt or field trial to the Labrador in a field trial or cold duck blind, each animal has an active tail and may experience injury to the tail muscles during or following exercise," she says.
"Because there is not room for the muscles to expand, they essentially become entrapped by a natural tourniquet, resulting in decreased blood flow. So, limber tail may be a type of compartment syndrome," Steiss says. "Without normal amounts of oxygen-rich blood, muscle cells start to degenerate. This causes.the pain and dysfunct
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I googled "cold/swimmer's tail and from what it said on the website, it sounds like that's what my Ace might have. We gave him a bath Sunday afternoon, and late Sunday night, early Monday morning is when I noticed his tail. This morning, he actually had it sticking half way up and was wagging it. Hopefully his tail will be back to normal by the weekend
 

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I had to change my user name due to some errors with the website....I am "Ace's mommy".....I am hoping when I get home from work that Ace's tail will be up at least half way again or even all the way up would be so much better
 

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I googled "cold/swimmer's tail and from what it said on the website, it sounds like that's what my Ace might have. We gave him a bath Sunday afternoon, and late Sunday night, early Monday morning is when I noticed his tail. This morning, he actually had it sticking half way up and was wagging it. Hopefully his tail will be back to normal by the weekend
Glad that he is getting better:)
 

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This morning, he actually had it sticking half way up and was wagging it. Hopefully his tail will be back to normal by the weekend
Yay! I hope he continues to get better! Good luck and healing drool from my two!
 

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Ruffus' mom

My Ruffus had this one day and I rushed him to the vet thinking his tail was broken. The vet asked me if he had a bath in the last day or two and I said yes. She called it "cold tail syndrome" and said it would pass in a day or two. She said it was more common in Labs.
Sounds like your dog has had it longer but my vet was right on the money for us. Ruffus lifted his tail the next day. It has happened since also.... always after a bath.

I have another Basset Lilly and her tail is never at attention like Ruffus. hope the tail thing passes for you too:)
 

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Ace's tail is still not 100% normal, but it's much better than it was last week. This morning he had it all the way up though, by the time I left it was half way down again. Hopefully it was just b/c he was jumping up onto the couch to get his morning nap in.
 

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We gave him a bath Sunday afternoon, and late Sunday night, early Monday morning is when I noticed his tail.
when giving a bath you want to use water close to the dogs body temp 100-102 warm niether hot nor cold.
 
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