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This is how the kids decided to eat their lunch today. Laying down!!! It's so funny how they do the same exact thing, at the same exact time!!



 

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Love those pictures! Bassets are so funny with the things they do. They sure don't waste any un-necessary energy, even when eating.

Here is Bogie saving energy while he eats. He always sits with that funny little sit he has when he eats.


Aroooos from Bogie Carter!!!!
 
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Bogie is so cute!! I love that sit position. I noticed he has an elevated feeder. Maggie Mae had one too. I read recently that they can possibly contribute to bloat??? Anyone else here that???
 

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Factors That Make NO Difference

These measures, long been thought to reduce the risk of bloat, were found to have no effect:

-Restricting exercise before or after eating

-Restricting water intake before and/or after meals

-Feeding two or more meals per day

-Moistening dry kibble before feeding

Factors That DO Make A Difference

These four (4) factors ARE associated with an increased risk of bloat in large breed dogs:

-Raising the food dish more than doubled the risk for bloat.

-Speed of eating: Dogs rated by their owners as very fast eaters had a 38% increased risk of bloat.

-Age: The study found that risk increased by 20% with each year of age. Owners should be more alert to early signs of bloat as their dogs grow older.

-Family History: Having a first-degree relative (parent, sibling or offspring) that had bloated increased a dog's risk by 63%.

Conclusions

The Purdue research team concluded these are the things you can do to prevent bloat:


-The strongest recommendation to prevent GVD (bloat) should be to not breed a dog that has a first degree relative that has had bloat. This places a special responsibility on an owner to inform the breeder should their dog bloat.

{Factors That Make NO Difference

These measures, long been thought to reduce the risk of bloat, were found to have no effect:

-Restricting exercise before or after eating

-Restricting water intake before and/or after meals

-Feeding two or more meals per day

-Moistening dry kibble before feeding

Factors That DO Make A Difference

These four (4) factors ARE associated with an increased risk of bloat in large breed dogs:

-Raising the food dish more than doubled the risk for bloat.

-Speed of eating: Dogs rated by their owners as very fast eaters had a 38% increased risk of bloat.

-Age: The study found that risk increased by 20% with each year of age. Owners should be more alert to early signs of bloat as their dogs grow older.

-Family History: Having a first-degree relative (parent, sibling or offspring) that had bloated increased a dog's risk by 63%.

Conclusions

The Purdue research team concluded these are the things you can do to prevent bloat:


-The strongest recommendation to prevent GVD (bloat) should be to not breed a dog that has a first degree relative that has had bloat. This places a special responsibility on an owner to inform the breeder should their dog bloat.

-Do not raise the feeding dish.

-SLOW the dog's speed of eating.

-SLOW the dog's speed of eating.
 

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Oh, gosh!! We did not know that about raised bowls. Thanks so much for the information. We just took the legs off the bowl holder, and his bowls are now flat on the ground.

Arooooos from Bogie Carter!!!!
 

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I guess I don't understand why you'd put bowls up on a stand to begin with. Looks inconvenient for the pooch, especially a basset, who's so low-slung. We've always kept food bowls on the floor -- except when we still had our kitty, he ate on the table (yes, ON it) because otherwise George would eat all his food up from him and he didn't get any. :roll: So his food bowl had to be out of George's reach. They shared a water bowl.
 

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Thanks for the information on the raised bowls, my hubby and I were talking about getting one for Teufel, but we will not be doing it now. Thanks again.


the pictures are so cute.
 
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I can only tell you why I got a raised feeder for Maggie Mae. I got it at a dog show years ago. It was being promoted for aging dogs and/or dogs with arthritis. It seemed like a good idea. She liked it and I never gave it a thought until recently (within the past several months) before I got the new dogs. I starting reading more about Bassets and bloat. I got rid of MM's feeder. It is great we have this forum!! I have learned so much from being an active member.
 

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It is a wonderful place to learn- I've thought of getting a raised feeder- but certainly won't now...
 

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Factors That Make NO Difference

These measures, long been thought to reduce the risk of bloat, were found to have no effect:

-Restricting exercise before or after eating

-Restricting water intake before and/or after meals

-Feeding two or more meals per day

-Moistening dry kibble before feeding

Factors That DO Make A Difference

These four (4) factors ARE associated with an increased risk of bloat in large breed dogs:

-Raising the food dish more than doubled the risk for bloat.

-Speed of eating: Dogs rated by their owners as very fast eaters had a 38% increased risk of bloat.

-Age: The study found that risk increased by 20% with each year of age. Owners should be more alert to early signs of bloat as their dogs grow older.

-Family History: Having a first-degree relative (parent, sibling or offspring) that had bloated increased a dog's risk by 63%.

Conclusions

The Purdue research team concluded these are the things you can do to prevent bloat:


-The strongest recommendation to prevent GVD (bloat) should be to not breed a dog that has a first degree relative that has had bloat. This places a special responsibility on an owner to inform the breeder should their dog bloat.

{Factors That Make NO Difference

These measures, long been thought to reduce the risk of bloat, were found to have no effect:

-Restricting exercise before or after eating

-Restricting water intake before and/or after meals

-Feeding two or more meals per day

-Moistening dry kibble before feeding

Factors That DO Make A Difference

These four (4) factors ARE associated with an increased risk of bloat in large breed dogs:

-Raising the food dish more than doubled the risk for bloat.

-Speed of eating: Dogs rated by their owners as very fast eaters had a 38% increased risk of bloat.

-Age: The study found that risk increased by 20% with each year of age. Owners should be more alert to early signs of bloat as their dogs grow older.

-Family History: Having a first-degree relative (parent, sibling or offspring) that had bloated increased a dog's risk by 63%.

Conclusions

The Purdue research team concluded these are the things you can do to prevent bloat:


-The strongest recommendation to prevent GVD (bloat) should be to not breed a dog that has a first degree relative that has had bloat. This places a special responsibility on an owner to inform the breeder should their dog bloat.

-Do not raise the feeding dish.

-SLOW the dog's speed of eating.

-SLOW the dog's speed of eating.
Oooh thank you so much Barbara... you are an angel!! Our girl is just 11 months old and I read and heard a lot about how raised bowls decrease chances of bloat in Bassets... But, looks like thats just a dangerous myth. I have now kept her bowl flat on the ground... Thanks you so much again!

Concerned Basset Dad!
 

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Well Lucy is good to go with the food bowl being flat on the floor - she lies down and wraps her big paws around the bowl and attacks it like a vacuum. The only way I could slow her down was get a special bowl that helps. She still eats fast but it no longer sounds like a vacuum is on – I hear actual chewing now.

Flash on the other hand, will lay there and look at her food forever, then eat one at a time. That is before she got sick. Now she's spoon fed.

Here is a link to the bowl we use for Lucy
http://www.drsfostersmith.com/product/prod_display.cfm?pcatid=19445&cmpid=01csesz&ref=3474&subref=AA

Jen~
 

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Yea, I just noticed that - but it looks like "Frida the Lady Basset" posted yesterday and it so it was moved to the top.

But heck, I don't even know my name lately, so who knows. :)

Jen~
 

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That corrected s there had concerns about bloat in a previous bost about bloat and was given the advice to search the forum for answers to other question so I would assume that is what happen shearch will find some very old posts and newbies are unlikely to look at the date of the post before posting on them.
 
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