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Discussion Starter #1
I just read about why a basset should be on large breed puppy food. I have always fed my puppy regular puppy food. I just bought and opened a large bag of food, so I really don't think my husband would be too happy if I said I needed to get a new bag (of large breed formula). Especially after just taking her to the vet. Would it be so bad if I switched to large breed puppy food after this bag is gone, which would be in a month or so??? Also, is there any supplements that are good for her growing bones? I know to ask a vet but I like to go to the vet with some ideas. Thank you!!!!
 

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Also, is there any supplements that are good for her growing bones?
that is the last think you want to do. It was calcium and bone growth supplements that lead to ortho problems.


Check the bag if the calcium content is above 1.5% I would not feed it until the dog was older, Reseal the bag or put it in a water/air tight container.

large Breed Puppies What is an appropriate Diet

Practical Nutrition for Large Breed Puppies


Skeletal Diseases of the Growing Dog: Nutritional Influences and the Role of Diet

Calcium excess is routed primarily to bone through the influence of the calciotropic hormones on target organs. Chronic, high intake of calcium in large breeds has been associated with hypercalcemia, concomitant hypophosphatemia, rise in serum alkaline phosphatase, retarded bone maturation, higher percentage of total bone volume, retarded bone remodeling, decrease in osteoclasts, and retarded maturation of cartilage. These changes cause disturbances in endochondral ossification (articular and epiphyseal).(6) When high calcium intake (calcium excess) is coupled with relatively little absorption from bone, severe pathologic changes occur in the young, growing skeleton that is unable to respond by normal remodeling and endochondral ossification. The clinical diseases associated with these changes are osteochondrosis, retained cartilage cones, radius curvus syndrome, and stunted growth.(1,6) Therefore, calcium excess is a major causative or contributing factor in the pathogenesis of skeletal disease in the growing giant-breed dog.(3-6)

...It is the absolute level of calcium, rather than the calcium/phosphorus ratio, that most influences skeletal disease.(11) Young, giant-breed dogs fed a diet containing 3.3% calcium (dry matter basis) and 0.9% or 3% phosphorus have significantly increased incidence of developmental bone disease. These dogs seem to be unable to protect themselves against the negative effects of chronic excess levels of calcium.(26) Calcium levels for a growth diet should be between 1% and 1.6% (dry matter basis).
Provide the calcium level is low enough in the food you currently have. Feeding to body condition rather than some magic formula on the back of the bag you should be fine.

Dog Diet Do's and Don’t's
According to Dr. Tony Buffington, Professor of Clinical Nutrition, Ohio State University College of Veterinary Medicine, your puppy can be fed a regimen of specific caloric intake compared to his body condition score (BCS), using a simple one to five scale, from overly thin to obese. Using manufacturer feeding recommendations as an initial starting point, feed your puppy to a score of two and maintain this weight until he's fully grown. Feed whatever amount is necessary to maintain a BCS of two during the growth period, realizing that dogs have varying growth rates and activity levels. Once his adult stature is achieved, you may allow him to reach a score of three

...2 = Thin - Ribs easily palpated and may be visible with no palpable fat. Tops of lumbar vertebrae visible. Pelvic bones less prominent. Obvious waist and abdominal tuck.
this means the puppy should be kept thin while it is growing. over-nutrition is the a biger problem than unerfeed contrary to popular belief. While once thought the problem protein level do not effect orthopeadic growth adversely provided total caloric intake is regulated. It is a problem of feed too much not one of feeding to much protein.
 

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Our puppies are 4.5 months and we use a brand of food that does not have large breed puppy food so we are mixing 1/3 puppy food with 2/3 adult food. Will probably switch to all adult food when the puppy food is gone.
 

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Why don't you do what I did when I realised I was doing what you have been doing... feeding them Eukanuba for a medium breed (just because when they were small, the puppy food bits were small too) which was to buy a sack of the large breed size and mix half of the standard into it and do the same next time!

My Bassets have come to no harm from it and when one of them was just 11 months old, I entered her into one of the Basset Hound shows and she came home with 'best newcomer', 'best bitch puppy' and 'best puppy in show' and the judge said she conformed perfectly, had a lovely head, soulful eyes, nice leathers and is a star of the future!

He seemed disappointed when I told him I'd only entered her to catch up with her breeder and two other Basset friends of mine! I said I'd rather take my dogs for a nice walk in the countryside or along the beach than walk them round and round a hall.... it was nice to know that she was top puppy for that day!!!

PS: I'm sure your pup won't come to any harm!
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Mixing the food is a great idea, then when that food is gone, I'll just use straight large breed formula. Thanks!!!!
 

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Why don't you do what I did when I realised I was doing what you have been doing... feeding them Eukanuba for a medium breed (just because when they were small, the puppy food bits were small too) which was to buy a sack of the large breed size and mix half of the standard into it and do the same next time!

My Bassets have come to no harm from it and when one of them was just 11 months old, I entered her into one of the Basset Hound shows and she came home with 'best newcomer', 'best bitch puppy' and 'best puppy in show' and the judge said she conformed perfectly, had a lovely head, soulful eyes, nice leathers and is a star of the future!

He seemed disappointed when I told him I'd only entered her to catch up with her breeder and two other Basset friends of mine! I said I'd rather take my dogs for a nice walk in the countryside or along the beach than walk them round and round a hall.... it was nice to know that she was top puppy for that day!!!

PS: I'm sure your pup won't come to any harm!

Awww...maybe you will want to show her again someday. You do have some beautiful bassets! I'm sure she loves her walks and trips to the beach more than anything!
 
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