Basset Hounds Forum banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Just wondering whether anyone else has had any problems with 'random' lameness in their bassets?

About 4 months ago Morgan started to limp really badly and wouldn't put his front left foot on the floor if he could help it. We prodded, poked, pulled... basically did everything we could to find out where it hurt him, but he is a very un-complaining dog and didn't so much as flinch. The vet said pretty much the same but thought it might be something to do with his shoulder joint. He was put on painkillers and anti-inflammatory's and the problem cleared up within a week (with total rest - or as close as you can get with a mad hound that won't sit still).

About 2 weeks ago he started to limp again, but favouring the other front leg. This time we went straight to the vets without any delay having already experienced this and knowing that a day or two resting wouldn't help. This time the vet thought the shoulder joint was clicking slightly but again couldn't place what it might be. He had another course of pills and it cleared up again.

The vet did mention that it might be because he is still growing (only being a year old).

I have looked at numerous websites and am at a loss. I've found a condition called 'Paneosteitis' (also known as wandering or transient lameness) described and think this is possibly the problem. If anyone has any other ideas I would appreciate hearing them.

Thankfully he is carrying on as normal at the moment, but I am constantly watching him for signs of a re-occurence
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,902 Posts
Panosteitis is known to be a problem in young bassets. Intermittent, shifting lameness is characteristic of this condition.

Some links:

Panosteitis (Vetcentric)
Panosteitis (Smith and Foster, discussion of causes is a little bit dated)
Panosteitis (Provet)

Some other causes of forelimb lameness in young dogs:

Elbow Dysplasia
Premature physeal closure, where the growth plate of one of the bones in the forelimb closes prematurely. The affected bone stops growing, while the other continues to grow and eventually becomes bowed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
773 Posts
I just brought home a nine-month-old bitch. She was limping on a front leg last week, this week it's a rear leg. Believe it or not, I'm relieved -- if it was the same leg, we could have a serious problem. Traveling leg pain is probably pano, which she should outgrow. Meantime, I'm treating her with Rymadil, buffered aspirin, and crate rest. Eloise would rather be out ripping around the house with Edith Ann and Charlie, but for now she has to suck it up!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
I just brought home a nine-month-old bitch. She was limping on a front leg last week, this week it's a rear leg. Believe it or not, I'm relieved -- if it was the same leg, we could have a serious problem. Traveling leg pain is probably pano, which she should outgrow. Meantime, I'm treating her with Rymadil, buffered aspirin, and crate rest. Eloise would rather be out ripping around the house with Edith Ann and Charlie, but for now she has to suck it up![/b]
Good, I'm really hoping it is that, for that very reason. The vet also said she'd be more worried if it was the same leg. It's just so hard to watch him desperate to keep up with our other dog (a springer spaniel) and unable to. He gets quite distraught when we go out for a walk without him. We do crate him to stop him tearing around the house, and after a while in the crate he settles down for a good nap. He just resents it to start with.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top