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I'm so sorry about Poppy not feeling well--I know it's hard when you're just helpless...When I'm helpless, I just put into the Hands of Someone Who isn't helpless! But still, I know it's hard, and the morning will soon be here. OK? :rolleyes:
 

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oh no!!!!!!!!!!!! :eek: I hope it is not serious!! What is her symptoms? Good luck and let us know what the doc said!!! Thinking of poppy and you!
 

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Keep us posted on Poppy! Sending lots of healing drool from South Dakota.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Hi all!

Thanks so much for the collective hug.. Made me feel great! :lol:

So, it turns out that Poppy is feeling under the weather because she's hurt her leg (she's limping all over the place :( ). She's off her food too so it must really hurt her :rolleyes: .

The vet has given me 5 days of pain killing drops and we've got to back on Saturday for an X-Ray if she's no better... I don't know how she did it, I've been racking my brains, as since we got her I've been so so careful to not excercise her too much or do the stairs thing etc. Maybe it's just one of those things.

The vet has also said not to walk her at all, just potty on a lead until she's better. The poor wee mite is a sorry looking thing right now... She cannot put any weight on her leg at all... :eek: :(

I'll keep you posted.

xx
 

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Discussion Starter #13
How old is Poppy? Did the vet think it might be panosteitis?

Poppy is almost 10 months old. Vet didn't really know what was wrong, but she seems a little better...But only when the pain killers are working... But she is eating a bit better..

I couldn't open the link you posted.. Can you give me some info as to what it is?

Thanks!
 

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I copied the info from the link below. Pano is not unusual in young bassets- Murray had problems with this around 10 months of age.I know there are others who can give you more thorough information, but I hope this provides enough information for you to discuss it with your vet if you think this is a possibility-


" Encyclopedia of Canine Veterinary Medical Information

Panosteitis

Panosteitis is a spontaneously occurring lameness that usually occurs in large breed dogs. German Shepherds seems to be particularly predisposed to this condition. Due to this, it is possible that the disease may have genetic causes. Some veterinarians feel that this disease may be induced or worsened by stress.

Affected dogs are usually in the 5 to 14 month age range and male dogs are more commonly infected than female dogs. The disease has been reported in dogs as young as 2 months and can occur in young mature dogs. The lameness tends to occur very suddenly, usually without a history of trauma or excessive exercise. In most cases one or the other front leg is affected first and then the problem tends to move around, making it appear that the lameness is shifting from leg to leg. There are often periods of improvement and worsening of the symptoms in a cyclic manner. This makes evaluation of treatment difficult since many dogs will spontaneously recover with or without treatment and then relapse.

X-rays usually reveal that the bones have greater density than is normally found. If pressure is applied over the long bones, pain is usually present. The X-ray signs do not always match the clinical signs.

In most cases, the worst pain lasts between one and two months but may persist in a cyclic nature for up to a year. Analgesic medications like aspirin can be be helpful. In severe cases, corticosteroids may provide relief.

Currently, a common rumor is that low protein, low calcium diets may prevent this condition. It should be noted that the energy level of low protein/calcium diets is often lower as well. If this is the case, a puppy will eat much more of the diet in order to meet its energy needs, resulting in higher total calcium consumption. It may be preferable to feed a puppy diet and restrict total quantity to keep the dog lean than to use a low protein/low calcium adult dog food.

This condition is self limiting, meaning that it will eventually go away, with or without treatment. Pain control can go a long way towards helping your pet feel more comfortable and should be used, though.



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Age is right for Pano. We have had two young male Bassets that had Pano, one at 10 months and the other around a year. One this spring, one seven years ago. Both started limping suddenly, both on the right front, and we took both to the vet where they were x-rayed. The x- rays were done basically to rule out other problems, but both times the vets stated Basset joints never looked the same from one Basset to the next or "normal" due to the breed being dwarfed down in size. Hopefully your vet is familiar with Bassets and their particular joints.
Both were put on Rimadyl and crate rest, meaning only time out of crate was to potty and eat. Tough on young Bassets to keep them still and contained. We listened to a lot of whining for those two weeks and went through alot of chew toys. We would let them out on the leash in the house and cuddle.
The vets told us Pano was very painful, like an inflammation of the bone and that some dogs would often be lethargic, run fever, etc. Both of ours popped back to their bouncy selves after the two weeks. One had a later occurance about two months later on the other front leg. Followed the same procedure and no more problems.
Good luck and hopefully it's Pano and nothing worse.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Thanks guys... SO much for all your help... I'll see what the vet says (although I don't hold out much hope, as I was able to answer some of HER questions regarding Bassetts!!!!!!).

I'll keep you posted...
 
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