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when I read that bassets were stubborn when it comes to housebreaking.....they weren't kidding!!! Charlie's first week went absolutely perfect, not a single accident in the house....but as time goes on it seems like they are becoming more frequent. He doesn't even give a warn...and if I catch him in the act and go to grab him and take him out the door he just continues to pee mid-air :shock: On top of that, he's become lazy, he won't even go to the grass to pee now, he'll just go right on the doorstep the second we go outside. So now I have to carry him to the grass. I don't mean to be a whiner, but this is slightly frustrating. He gets food and water on a schedule, we take him outside 30 minutes after food or water, right after he wakes up from naps, every 20 minutes or so during playtime, but he still goes in the house. ::Vent session over::
 

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Moe took many months to housetrain, and was almost two years old before he was accident-free. I think that males are harder to train but I may be wrong - it may be that some females take time, too. Some Bassets train quickly but of the ones I know there were no quick-learners.

Here is how we house-trained Moe:

First decide on a reward - what does Charlie respond best to? Most Bassets LOVE food above all else but some prefer extra attention (like lots of petting, or a quick toss of a ball or toy). We used to keep a jar of pupperoni near the door. I bought a large cannister at our local warehouse store and cut the Pupperoni into inch-long peices. They were the perfect size for quick rewards. Some people use kibble, hotdog peices, cheese, or even veggie treats - my boss used carrot bits to train his dog.

Then, once you've decided on your reward, take Charlie outside on a leash to a spot you want him to pee. Stand there and say in a high happy voice "Go pee, Charlie, go pee" over and over and give him every opportunity to do so. Don't walk around with him, stay in one spot. (I would cup the treat in my hand and clasp my fist to my chest as I asked Moe to pee.) Give him a few minutes, and if he doesn't go pee, DO NOT REWARD HIM, but take him back inside. (I would put Moe's treat back in his jar near the door.) If he hasn't peed recently, take him back out every twenty or thirty minutes until he does. Once he pees for you, you MUST PRAISE THE HE** OUT OF HIM and give him his reward IMMEDIATELY. Make a very big deal out of it! When he doesn't pee, ignore him and do not scold him, just try again later. Eventually he'll get the idea that he gets something good for doing what you want. Bassets LOVE positive attenion and/or food. Be patient and be persistent. Above all BE PATIENT. Our trainer told us it take approx. three months for a behavior to become a 'learned' behavior so expect setbacks. Accidents will happen less and less often. Give him time.

We trained Moe to pee on our gravel driveway. He was so well-trained that first year that, when I walked him, EVERY TIME we passed a gravel driveway he would squat and pee. He was so smart and so loved his treats that, even if he didn't have to go, he would make a big show of going out to the driveway to squeeze out a few drops just to get a treat. 8)

The other thing you need to do is watch Charlie closely for some kind of sign that he needs to go. Some people have had great success teaching thier dogs to ring bells or give some other signal that they need to go out. My Moe used to just sit in front of one of our four doors to the outside. He sat silently and patiently. He didn't bark or whine or make any kind of noise. If nobody noticed him, we'd find a puddle near the door he had been sitting near. I put two and two together and began to be aware of where he was AT ALL TIMES. It was much like having a toddler in the house again. Eventually he learned to scratch at the door if he wanted to go out. :x I'd hear him scratch and fly to the door to let him out - I guess he trained me! :oops: It's harder to untrain a bad habit than it is to teach a good habit so we live with scratched doors. :roll:

Good luck to you!

Terry :D
 

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I understand your woes completely...Jackie did the same thing, it was like as soon as she figured out that we are keeping her forever, the words "go outside" don't exist any more.

We started puppy class at petsmart today and our trainer suggested the exact same things as Terry. Treat treat treat and pretty much act like a crazy beauty queen who as just been crowned Miss America at the sight of some pee-pee!!! :roll:
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for all the advice, I'm definately going to put some of it to use. We have been treating him for peeing outside but I got lazy on my part and only do it when I think to grab a treat, but I guess I need to get more consistant with that. I bought a package of jingle bells to hang by the door but keep forgetting to hang the darn things (guess I should go do that now).

When he goes in the house I let out a shout "wrong", grab him up and run for the door, then treat him if he pees outside. Am I doing anything wrong with that? .... just please don't tell me to rub his nose in it...I've had people tell me I should but I just think that's wrong and WON'T do it.
 

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Well according to the pet trainer, the best punishment for bad behavior is ignoring the dog. If Charlie goes inside and you catch him then just place him outside and TREAT if he goes. If you don't catch him in the act then don't punish him because he won't know why.

I would never use a newspaper...eventually Charlie will understand that when he goes outside he gets SOMETHING, where as when he goes inside, he gets NOTHING and he will want to go outside. The hard part is figuring out "how" he is telling you that he needs to go outside. I still don't know when Jackie is telling me but I guess it will get better as she gets older.
 

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I would ignore his mistakes - don't acknowledge them at all - and DEFINATELY don't rub his nose in it. Priase the heck out of him and treat good behaviors - ignore the bad.

Moe had a serious biting problem when we adopted him from a shelter as a half-grown pup. Among other things (there were a combination of things we used to handle his biting), we ignored him when he was bad. It was VERY effective because what Moe LOVED was attention. Bad behavior didn't get him any - good behavior did. When he got too excited and began to bite I turned my back on him. I'd keep turning away each time he tried to come around me and catch my eye. I pretended he wasn't there... he'd instantly calm down and go lay in his crate with that hang-dog look on his face. Attention, whether good or bad, is it's own reward so don't reward bad behavior with any attention at all. Good luck.

Terry
 

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I know exactly where you are coming from, I came to this forum a new basset owner and was so unaware of what was going on, I did my research but apparently I didn't take it seriously. Duncan used to urinate every 5 minutes, no joke. I thought that there was something wrong with him. He is seven months old now and almost completely potty trained. I didn't think we would ever get here.
 

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I believe 9 months to 1 year is the most common age range for a basset to potty train. Jake has been consistent since about 15 months... except for the occasional assault on my laundry baskets (not sure but he seems to think they need to be marked routinely). My other basset has been fine since about 6 months... however Willie (ATB) trained her so she went very easily :) Lots and lots of consistency and praise!
 

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George was already trained when we got him but coming to a new house upset him and he wanted to go out ALL THE TIME. He would usually piddle a bit but I think the main thing was he wanted to see where the boy was who had lived at his old house and of course, he wasn't here. Eventually, he learned to either sit at the door and stare at us pointedly or come bug us until we let him out, and unfortunately the "I want a treat. NOW" routine is exactly like the "I gotta pee. NOW" routine. LOL He still has the occasional accident, if we're gone or busy and don't notice him asking to go, and I never make a fuss about it. Sometimes I say, "Oh, for pete's sake, GEORGE" and he'll always insist it was the OTHER dog (we don't HAVE another dog) or pretend he doesn't have ANY IDEA what that puddle is or how it got there.

Sounds to me like giving him a treat when he piddles outside and ignoring it when he has an accident is the best advice. He is only a baby, after all. It'll take some time for him to get onto it. Buy lots of paper towels and hunker down until he does.
 
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