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i havent posted on here in a long while due to work beening so busy...

i was wondering if anyone could help me please:

we have two female bassets. Snoopy who is three, we bought her at 12 weeks old from the breeders. and our new addition Lily, 3.5 years old which we bought off a friend of a friend approx 3 months ago.

Snoopy has always been a little bit difficult at times. very loving and fairly well behaved however over the past week or so her behaviour has kind of turned aggressive.

I will give you two examples of why im concerned:

night time comes, she's asleep on the sofa, i ask both dogs in a nice voice to get up and go pee before bed time. Lily wakes up (slowly), walks out to the garden, goes to pee and then heads straight for her bed. Snoopy stays led on the sofa looking at me i ask her again and my voices gets sturner and sturner each time. she beginns to growl and then often lunges towards me as if to bite (but never has).
as she is then off the sofa she then proceeds to the garden.

again nightime comes, Lily has been put to bed under the stairs, snoopy is sat in the kitchen after peeing out in the garden but refuses to budge. either myself or my partner will try and nudger her to move but she wont. if you were to then try to either pick her up to move her or to push her butt with your foot she will grown and snap at you. but she has never bit. her teeth have wrapped around my arm and my boyfriends arm once or twice but she stops herself from actually biting.

i know she likes her own space and often reminds Lily of that. She's slept next to Lily day and night under the stairs since Lily arrive but has never cuddled up to her or has barely touched her when sitting or lying down.

do we have an agression problem or is she just refusing to be with Lily?

I'll also mention that over the past week or so also we've been walking up to a pee on the floor and even a number two this morning and I know its Snoopy thats doing it...

please can you let me know your thoughts. thanks
 

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i havent posted on here in a long while due to work beening so busy...

Snoopy has always been a little bit difficult at times. very loving and fairly well behaved however over the past week or so her behaviour has kind of turned aggressive.[/b]

Anytime there is a signifcant change in behavior it is good idea to rule out a medical cause first. Pain is just one obvious reason a dog does not want to be touched.

Secondly no dog likes to be manhandlled, dragged, pulled ect. it is uncomfortable. Now while you view it as her behavior ( not obeying your requests) as the cause of this, that is not the way dogs percieve it. Over time as more and more occurs. the dog assocates this pain as comming from your pressence in certain circumstances and seeks the best way it knows how to prevent it. If you persist in this cycle it is quite likely the dog will esculate it behavior even more.
The solution is to find a way to move the dog without resorting to physical means

see How Much Does Your Dog's Cooperation Weigh?
Physical struggles aren't the point in relationship based training.

LEADERSHIP BASICS
A simple guide to regaining your dog's respect in pleasant, non-confrontational ways.

PUNISHMENT

DOG REFUSING COMMANDS - STUBBORN?

Working with a Difficult Dog PDF

AGGRESSION BEGETS AGGRESSION

Working With Food

Hard to Train ?


To change the dogs attitude about you and you approaching her under certain circustances you are going to have to revise how you go about training the dog and gaining compliance with a command. Dogs do what they percieve in their best interest. For many dogs avoiding pain etc is not enough motivation they need something more positive like a bit of food for compliance. A little change in approach can have a profound effect on your relationship with the dog.

It is my general experience with even all the book learn'in possible without some coaching from an instructor humans have a difficult time moving out of their comfort level in terms of training dogs, Seeking out a trainer/class the specialize in a more positive based approach to training will go a long way getting you there. But I can not over emphysis the importance of patience in dog training.

I'll also mention that over the past week or so also we've been walking up to a pee on the floor and even a number two this morning and I know its Snoopy thats doing it...[/b]
It is never good idea to assume, find out with certaint before working with a single dog else it is better to assume it is both dogs with the problem. Accidents in an otherwise previously housetrained dog are often caused by medical issues as well, especially UTIs (urinary tract infection)
 

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I second the suggestion that you not assume Snoopy is doing the pooping and peeing. In fact, since you have a new pup in the house, it would seem more logical that it's her.

One question: you seem to be saying they're sleeping together. Is there any reason you *don't* want them sleeping together? In my doggie household, sleeping together is the ultimate for the pups and, in my (limited) experience, when they start sleeping together, they're well on their way to becoming good buds.

If they are sleeping together, why not just let them?

Also, have you considered a doggie door? I have one here, and it is (imo) the greatest thing since sliced bread (although I don't like sliced bread :lol: ). I was having horrid problems with little Bailey's potty habits - but no more! One accident since I moved into a house with a doggie door, and that accident happened because she just hadn't figured it out yet.

Finally, how old is Snoopy? Any chance you're dealing with some old, cranky bones - aka, arthritis - or the like?
 
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