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Ok so sleep deprivation and frustration are setting in at the moment (its like having a new baby), and although I love my 9 week old puppy today I would trade him to the gypsies for magic beans. Few major issues well one big one really the others are just side effects of it. I have a 6 month old mini Dachshund (Abby) and we just got this new basset puppy (Monty). House training is going about as well as one would expect with a 9 week old although my husband seems to have this idea that a 9 week old can be malicious and pee in the house when he doesn’t get the attention he wants (insert eye roll here) any how that’s not my issue.
Monty the last couple days has been playing really rough with Abby at first they were both nipping but as soon as anyone squeaked the other let go, now he’s not letting her go, and it seems like he’s constantly at her. This morning when I let them both out of their crates and into the back yard he wouldn’t let her poop, any time she tried he kept charging at her and trying to play, eventually she quit trying and even when she was out there on her own she didnt (its like she was telling me the moment has passed momma, come back later). And this morning when I fed them he kept bugging her when she was at the food bowl. It’s like he’s trying to bully her and I’m not sure how to nip this in the bud.
 

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It sounds like he's just being a normal puppy; but you can't let him hurt the other smaller dog- if she's not able to set her own boundaries because of his size and exuberance, and is getting hurt, you need to set the boundaries.


I'd feed her separately and take her out to poop on her own.

As far as the peeing, you're right, he's not being malicious. Just get him on a strict schedule, and remember that activity makes urine, so when he's active he'll need to go out more.

We've always had miniature dachshunds with Murray, and even though they've been 9-14 pounds to his 63 pounds, they've pretty much been the bosses around here.
 

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i always thought toby was a big bully too but now i realize he's just behaving like the puppy he is. my older, bigger lab mix used to take it and take it and take it, but now he snaps at toby if he's being too annoying. toby always used to take his food even if he had his bowl sitting right there. i feed them seperately now.
 

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Puppies until 16-20 month are givin a big leaway in their behavior with adult. this is general referred to as "puppy license", adult females even more so than males. After that age as the sex hormone level in the pup rise the license is revoke and the pups are often harrassed into submission by the adults again more so by males than females

for more details and links to articles on this subject see
[URL="http://dailydrool.hyperboards.com/index.php?action=view_topic&topic_id=15650&start=1"]I've increased the pack[/url] thread on another board.
 

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It is quite surprising to see a Dachsund would take such abuse :)

Actually, have you seen Abby tried to discipline him? I think your puppy is just being a puppy. In my case, when he does that to my roommate's sharpei, he got corrected right away by the old dog. and, my puppy would behave. If Abby cannot do her job, then it is your responsibility to set the boundary for your puppy.

This is what I normally do:
One thing you can do is to sternly say "NO!" and use some type of body language like waving your finger at him. If he ignored your warning, avert Monty's attention by clapping your hand or banging on a pan or something loud to startle him a bit.

If he bite he gets time out. You should leave Monty alone and completely ignore him after some time.

Another one is to hold him sternly but gently by his scruff and put him to a sitting position (just like a mommy dog would discipline her puppies).

In the meantime, if he is too much for Abby and you to handle, feeding and taking them out to pee separately might be best.

Gus (my puppy) love to steal the old dog's food. But, I constantly train him now that every time I wag my finger at him and say "hey hey" He gets the point and go to his own bowl.
The key is not to let your puppy get away with murder.. It can be sooo hard sometimes with a Basset sad face. But, as parents, you should be stronger :)
 

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I got two Basset sisters at the same time at nine weeks of age and what your pup is doing, is the same as my two have always done, which is not really bullying, it's just a basset at play and a bit of rough and tumble, like they do with their litter mates.

Look at my pair the week after we got them! The first clip they are 10 weeks and the second one they are 3 months old. They love a bit of rough and tumble but I suppose Dachshunds aren't built as big as Bassets so it looks like they're being bullied by a big boy!


Regarding the weeing indoors, you can't expect such a young puppy to be clean for some time yet as bassets are not the quickest learners but in the past, we have had pups who have copied the older ones we already had and followed them out to wee and learned quicker than my two present pups have done because we have a 12-year old dog that doesn't seem to wee very often and can hold himself for hours if he wants to, so he's not been a good role model to copy toileting from!!

A good Basset breeder would have asked you lots of questions about why you wanted a Basset pup, what you know of the breed. If people only want one for their cuteness, they should have researched Bassets, because they are known to be very stubborn, with minds of their own! Some breeders won't let you have a Basset pup if you have not had experience of them, so you must be very patient and reward good behaviour and you'll have maybe 15 or more fun-filled years!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
through diligence yesterday and I'm thinking a whole lot of luck we had an accident free day. I used the advice and let them play, but if it gets too heated i clap my hands to take them out of the zone and they stop and look at me like I'm a buzz kill, and then pout for a little bit. I researched bassets for about 3 months before we got him, learning everything i could about the breed but books only take you so far. My husband has grown up with them so he was well aware of their stubbornness, and i have interacted with the adult ones his parents have.

treats are the only thing he understands but i knew that from my in-laws dogs however we had such a treat filled day a few days ago that it gave him the runs so now my pockets are filled with kibble (he doesn't care what it is as long as your handing it to him) however i do have to make sure that i empty the pockets of my jeans before i wash them, and makes for an interesting discussion when you are shopping with people and discover you forgot to empty them before you leave... any how.

I did walk into this with eyes open but in all honesty no amount of reading will prepare you for the RL basset experience. and i think the start of yesterday through sleep deprivation and the sheer craziness made it what i call a magic bean day ( love my babies but if the gypsies came and offered me magic beans i cant say i would turn them down) and then you pick them up they snuggle in and all the stepped in pee spots and lack of sleep are forgotten.
 

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Well I'll give you some beans for them and they can come and live in the country with our gang!!!

PS: I hadn't realised you have already got Bassets in your family, so you know what they're like! :)
 

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Abby puts up with it and plays back she is just as rough as he is, my concern was when they were going at it yesterday normally when she yelps he lets go, yesterday he didnt. he kept biting and she had to pry her self away and leap onto a chair to get away. its the only time hes done that so im just keeping an eye out now. for the most part she gives as good as she gets infact last night they each had half of a tug toy and she was pulling him on the kitchen floor
 

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Very small bits of carrots and cheese work great as training treats. I used to use kibble but my pup started to get bored with them. Just a little tip!
 

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ooooo great Idea i know Abby loves both, and if she will eat it he HAS to have it. so far another accident free day. on a side note I've also washed all my tile floors with a vinegar water mix, other then my house smells like vineger it seems to have helped
 

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I used the advice and let them play, but if it gets too heated i clap my hands to take them out of the zone and they stop and look at me like I'm a buzz kill, and then pout for a little bit.
This is not necesarely a good thing. IF there are no injuries there was no intent to injure. Human intervention often justs messes up dog v dog relationships

seePuppy license and adult behavior–STOP SEPARATING PLAY.

Humans are REALLY bad at reading what’s happening with dogs. We ignore really bad stuff and we stop, even punish, perfectly normal behavior. This is true even when you’re really experienced; I have spent thousands of hours studying this stuff and I am more convinced that I am an idiot when it comes to dog behavior than I was when I began. Maybe when I’m sixty I’ll start interfering, but right now I know perfectly well how dumb I am.
One of the reasons we screw up interactions has to do with the fact that, just like we humans do, dogs have communications that have beginnings, middles, and ends. The beginning is the series of behaviors that initiate the interaction, the middle is the interaction itself, and the end is when the dogs resolve or end the interaction and move back away from each other.
That entire cycle is VERY important. If it is not completed, the next time the dog or dogs tries to interact the “transaction” won’t go as smoothly. Some of the social lubrication will have been lost.
If interactions are routinely truncated, two bad things happen: First, the dogs involved don’t get to finish the conversation, so they get out of practice in how to finish interactions. This is a lot more dangerous than it sounds–every dog interaction is a finely honed and subtle meeting of two animals perfectly prepared to kill each other. Predator-to-predator transactions are not exactly natural, and dogs have evolved an incredibly complex series of behaviors to keep things from escalating into an attempt to physically harm. If they are bad at those behaviors–if instead of suave and smooth talkers they’ve become awkward and tend to say the wrong thing–they are in genuine danger of falling from normal transaction into a situation where one or the other of them will make a move toward a killing attempt.
The second bad thing that happens is along the same line, but it involves those two dogs in particular. If they cannot finish the conversation they began, they do not have a chance to do all the appeasement/backing up behaviors that they would normally do. The conversation is cut off just when things are getting tense. So when the dogs see each other again, they will be more heightened in their interaction than they would have been if they’d been allowed to complete the cycle. This makes them even more likely to need to have a conversation that gets tense, and when they are again separated the stakes get even higher.
This does not mean on should never interfere but I personnally stay on the sidelines unless I have good reason to suspect physical harm is likely to occur to one or more of the participants.
 

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I'm not really sure what is right or wrong with interfering, and just go by feel. but I generally do not interfere unless one is yelping and the other is not stopping. With the notable exceptions of when their play threatens to damage furniture. Also if one sneaks up on the other and grabs an ear or tail I usually stop that, but then let them continue.
 

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I'm not really sure what is right or wrong with interfering, and just go by feel.
The risk with interfere to much is the dogs rely on the interference and it alters ther behavior. Just like that jerk of a sibbling that keep needling the other until it provokes a response. The parental unit intervenes and disiplines the one that was provoked into responding. This is a major reason for any dog v dog disipline not to try an only punshish the percieved aggressor. It takes two dogs to have a fight at any time one could back down, If both are equaly punishished it is less likely to promote the low threshold aggresive acts the go unnoticed by humand but not other dogs. The other porblem with intervening is a dog may never become fluent it its own language which can create a life time of problems when it encounters other dogs.

Failure to intervene could result in catistrauphic injury or death, So their is alway a bit of "feel" to deciding when and when not to intervene. And know one on a forum like this can begin to make even an educated assertion as to where it is better to ornot to intervene without actual seeing the dogs interact in all the contexted. What I try to provide is info for other to consider when deciding what that threshold should be for themselves

One will find that individuals that are inheirently good with dogs have very good feel those that don't do not, and sometimes reevaluating what they are doing and why can help come up with a criteria for them to use that helps.
 

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This is a major reason for any dog v dog disipline not to try an only punshish the proceeved aggressor..
I generally don't punish either of them, just make them stop if I think it is getting out of hand.

What is sort of strange with my current two, is neither shows hardly any Alpha tendencies toward the other.
 

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t is sort of strange with my current two, is neither shows hardly any Alpha tendencies toward the other.
That is because dogs do not form linear pack hierarcies. there is little to suport "pack behavior" in dogs at all. The alpha dog is more myth than reality.

The Social Organization of the Domestic Dog

The theory that a hierarchy based on dominance relationships is the organizing principle in social groups of the sort canis lupus is a human projection that needs replacing. Furthermore, the model has unjustifiably been transferred from its original
place in the discussion of the behavior of wolves to the discussion of the behavior of domestic dogs (canis familiaris). This paper presents a new, more adequate model of how familiaris organizes itself when in groups. This paper is based on a longitudinal study of a permanent group of five randomly acquired dogs living in their natural habitat, as they interact with each other within the group, with newcomers of various species who joined the group, and with fleetingly met individuals of various species in their outside environment. This study shows that the existence of the phenomenon "dominance" is
questionable, but that in any case "dominance" does not operate as a principle in the social organization of domestic dogs. Dominance hierarchies do not exist and are in fact impossible to construct without entering the realm of human projection and fantasy. The hypotheses were tested by repeatedly starting systems at chaos and observing whether the model predicted the evolution of each new system.

...The dominance hierarchy model violates the rules of parsimony. No broad, comparative study has been done, for example, comparing the incidence of "dominant" aggression between domestic dogs raised and trained using positive reinforcement and those raised and trained using negative reinforcement and punishment techniques designed to elicit avoidance behavior. This should have been done before behavior was attributed to an internal, inherited need to operate within a “dominance hierarchy”, presuming the animal is thinking about "rank" in its interactions with humans, etc. Statistical analysis has shown that food guarding behavior in domestic dogs correlates with the development of "dominant" behavior toward humans (Overall 1997). Thus, it is assumed that food guarding is an early sign of a "dominant personality" in a dog (Overall 1997). In fact, this correlation is a result of operant conditioning. In guarding food, aggression may be
reinforced by the other (human) animal's withdrawing to a greater distance. The reinforced behavior emancipates itself and, reinforced in other situations, becomes a generalized behavior. This is an example of the way in which statistical analysis
can produce trivial information and serve to mask rather than reveal the mechanisms which are, in fact, operating. It is also an example of how a model, once adopted as a persistent belief, can act as a filter distorting perceptions to the point that observations lose all value and enter the realm of fantasy.
 

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Hard to picture a basset as a bully--but as a boss, yes. My brother has a female basset and a female golden retriever mix. Even though the basset is half the size of the other dog, she is the queen. She adores my brother and doesn't like to share his attention with his wife or the other dog.

We had a female basset when I was a teenager, and we also had several cats. She loved playing with them, but she was such a big klutz after awhile (she reached 60 lbs her first year) that the cats would attempt to frame her--"accusing" her of bullying by hissing and spitting at her when she got too rambunctious, even when they started it. Poor Alice. She got her revenge on one of them, though--we had a sliding glass door to the backyard. The alpha cat used to sit inside the curtain and stare through the glass. Alice would come up and lean against the curtain, pinning the cat to the door and nearly squashing her. "Moosh the cat" became her favorite game.
 

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I love that word 'rambunctious' as the sound of it describes my Bassets really well when they either drag or push our old Cocker Spaniel along with them when walking or if they're going out into the garden, whether or not he wants to go with them!!!
 
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