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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all. I am not exactly new around here, but def. haven't posted in a while. My basset, Griffin, is approximately 1 and 1/2 years old, has always had good health and is at a decent weight. Recently, he has been somewhat more fickle about his food, but still eats like a good hungry and healthy boy should.

My concern is this:
For the last couple of days he has thrown up several times, usually yellow bile, and occasionally containing monkey grass or bits of these large acorns that grow near the house. He has some history with vomiting, but never with the frequency he now and never after he has actually been eating his food. The vet initially recommended giving him Pepcid at night to settle his stomach (because he was usually having issues during the middle of the night, thank goodness for the long canine warmup I guess to have time to prepare). We haven't done this yet because we wanted to test the waters here and get some feedback, but I am nervous that it could be something that is more serious, but won't be detected by the fecal sample which they will undoubtedly take and which will undoubtedly turn out negative like always. Any thoughts, help, advice or drool is most appreciated.

Here is some pics of Griff as a pup for a visual aid.
[attachment=473:Griffin1.jpg]
[attachment=472:Griffin2.jpg]
[attachment=471:griffcouch.jpg]

Thanks so much!
Shepard
 

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It could be a minor stomach irritation, or it could be any of a number of other things which could be more serious.

If he were mine, I'd take him in and have the vet check him out. (I'd also try to keep him away from those acorns.)
 

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If it's happening mainly in the morning, after an overnight fast, then you might be able to improve things by giving him a biscuit or two at bedtime. Some dogs experience upset stomach with vomiting of bilious material when their stomachs are empty for too long. Feeding twice a day also helps. If the vomiting doesn't seem to fit this scenario, then having him evaluated is a good idea.
 

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When I first got Rusty he threw up yellow bile everyday. From this forum, I learned he might need something in his belly. Now I feed him several small meals a day. He hasn't thrown up in so long I can't remember. He definitely needs something in his stomach at all times. Hope yours is as easy a solution as that. Keep us posted :)
 

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Discussion Starter #5
*** UPDATE ***

Took Griff to the vet this morning, after a trying and troubling night with much Basset sickness. He was very weak and dehydrated, so in addition to Xrays and bloodwork they started an IV for him. After also performaing Looks like there is a small object lodged in his stomach, most likely one of the large acorns (green or brown and roundish with husks) falling by the thousands behind the house. It cannot be passed, most likely so surgery is looking more like the direction we're headed.

Does anyone here have experience with foreign body removal surgery for a dog (especially a basset) ? Hoping for the best as the doc said it was a fairly routine procedure, seeing more than a few lab puppies who've gotten a variety of things inside them at their practice.

Send good vibes.
thanks
shepard
 

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Rusty had a rock removed from his small intestine in July. The Vet thinks we caught it fairly early since his intestines were spared. No bruising and they didn't have to remove any of his intestine. We knew immediately there was something wrong with him. He vomited several times with no relief. He acted very "weird" which is so out of character for him. Sat in the corner staring at the wall! The surgery went well but the recovery was hard for him. He had to have 6 very small meals daily for almost 10 days. His activity was limited and he reacted to one of the stitches and has some liquid draining but no infection. He did great and hopefully that will be it. The surgery was $$$$$$$$$!!! Here's a photo of the collar he wore instead of an E collar. Thanks to Connie, Bogie's Mom for the idea!

Good Luck and let us know how he's doing!
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Here's another update on Griffin.

He did, in fact, end up needing surgery to remove an acorn-like oak pod from his tummy. Actually it had worked its way down to his intestine and caused a lot of bruising. He did fine in surgery, but ended up needing 24 hour observation and a TON of fluids because he was dehydrated and his pack cell volume was way above normal. Just for educational purposes, from what my vet tells me, optimal PCV for dogs is between 55 and 33. Griffin's after surgery was near 80, which was not good at all.

After getting pumped with fluids for a couple days, he is doing much better, to our relief. Thanks everyone here for your concern and well wishes. It's been a rough week for us but he should be home today, where we can monitor his diet and let him ride the rest out on his bed.

thanks again.
shepard
 

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I'm sorry he ended up having to have surgery, but glad he is on the road to recovery!

Silly houndies - they will eat anything that doesn't eat them first! Hope he has learned his lesson, but I tend to doubt it! They can be so stubborn.

Give him a belly rub from me when his belly isn't so sore.
 

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Edith Ann needed to have a couple of rocks removed summer before last. She now wears a basket muzzle to go outside. We also have lots of acorns here, and my concern with those is not just getting lodged in the gut, but the sharp edges as a result of breaking the outer core.....
 

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Our Bogie has had two surgeries to remove lodged rocks, one in June 2006 and one in September 2006. He was confined to his crate to help him with healing, and he did get to lie on his outside pipe bed when we were right there. As Patti said 6 small meals a day for 10 days, but he made it through both with flying colors and no problems. He does wear a muzzle now whenever he is outside to prevent him from doing this again. You might want to go this route for peace of mind when Griffin is outside. I did have to put mesh around the bottom of the muzzle because Bogie learned he could lick up things with his tongue through the holes. He can pant with it on and drink water. We don't leave him out alone for long with it on.
I'll try to get a close up of the muzzle mesh fix and post it if you want it. Let me know.


Bogie with his towel collar which prevented him form chewing and licking his stitches.


Bogie with his muzzle. He does great with it on and he has adapted to it.
 
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