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Hello - this is my first post in this group. We have 15 year old basset hound, Rufus, whom we have had since he was a puppy. Quite a character! We got him while we were living in Guatemala. He’s about sixty pounds, I think he is the European variety of basset (given his size).
 

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lol Sixty is not that large for a male basset hound rather typical


Patch eating his Reserve Winners Dog Ribbon at Nationals just over a year and over 60#

dexter on the other hand is from Canada

Had a couple of my "kids" come in for grooming today. Lulu (tri) is a normal sized basset. Then there's Dexter (red). 17" and 95 lbs - not fat. I have no idea what happened there, I've never produced anything that big before. Fortunately he's a big loveable goof.
 

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Mikey T - I agree, sixty pounds not unusual for a basset; Rufus has been as much as 65 pounds in the past. What I meant was that his body shape and muzzle shape seems to be different from many bassets I see here. Am I correct that there are variations in the breed between Europe and the U.S.? Or is it just individual variability?

Patch is looking good!
 

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there can be some structural difference in what wins in the show ring between Europe and US but here in the US we will say they are devaiting from the standard. lol

Basset Hound: A World History (2019 edition)
I hate to break the news to those engaged in marketing the “AKC registered European Basset Hounds”, “Euro-Bassets”, or the “100% European Basset Hounds” (and the one I like the best), the “Half-European Basset Hounds”... as there is no such animal. All low-set hounds known as “Basset Hounds” sprang from breeds in Belgium and France (Basset D’Artois and/or Basset De Normande). These hounds made their way to England by way of two particular hounds known as “Basset” and “Bell” gifted to Lord Galway. They were from a strain of hounds bred by Count le Couteulx de Canteleu of Etrepagny, France. Through the years of trial and error cross-breeding and inbreeding, and while the Basset D’Artois and Basset De Normande found their way to extinction, the resulting hound called the “Basset Hound” was developed on English shores (ref. FCI-Standard #163).
No ... George Washington neither slept here, nor with, nor had Basset Hounds from anywhere. The first to step into the USA came with the Earl of Aylesford to Big Spring, Texas in 1883 and subsequently either died off or went back to England with the Earl's body after he drank himself to death (a story for another day). They were bred by Mr. George Krehl in England. In the same year (1883), a Mr. Chamberlain purchased for Mr. Lawrence Timpson’s Maizeland Kennels in Red Bank, New Jersey, a hound from Mr. Krehl’s breeding called “Nemours” and he was the first Basset Hound shown in the USA.
“Basset Hounds” from England were then exported to European countries. Finding Basset Hounds with “totally European” pedigrees is an impossibility as unknown to most Americans, the English have never (even before the EU or “Brexit”) thought of themselves as Europeans (Brits being from an island that built a world empire and most others are from the European continent). Also, because several British and European bloodlines used imported studs from America.
So-called “European” Basset Hounds come from kennels that do generate relatively more bone size and loose skin but as well, are GENERALLY lacking in the prominent fore-chest and the correct shoulder assembly called for in both the AKC and FCI Standards. Why is that important? It’s what makes correct Basset Hound structure, not how much excess skin you can see! Getting an AKC number for a European-born Hound is no real trick as there is no distinction made between the registering bodies. A Basset Hound is a Basset Hound with more or less “type” (skin and bone size) no matter on which continent it was born. You will find a variance of type and of style (a specific look credited to a particular kennel strain) on EVERY continent in the world but all are still Basset Hounds; not European, not American, Australian, South American, etc.


Given your location I would not be surprised by a strong "Lake-Park " influence given their relative dominance in South America

 
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