Basset Hounds Forum banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Another forum newbie - with a basset who's kind of a newbie himself! Our pup, Rooney, is 14 weeks old, and all his breed is cracked up to be - loving, sensitive, stubborn, and adorable (in our opinion). We do have a few questions for all you experienced bassetiers:

- We need to mulch a section of our (tiny) yard. I know to stay away from cocao mulch, but bark or pine mulch makes me nervous too; at this age, he's kind of a bark-and-twig Hoover Vacuum. I was thinking that peat moss might work - it lacks that delightful woody crunch he likes so well. Any reason I should not use peat moss with a basset in the house?

- We're semi-urban dwellers, and because of said tiny yard, leash walks are a must for exercise and to wind down the puppy crazies. Rooney has other ideas. He doesn't mind the leash, but getting down to the park at the end of our block takes 45 minutes: every 10 feet, he plops his butt right down on the sidewalk and won't budge. It doesn't seem to be a fear reaction, and he loves every person and dog he meets on the street. He isn't limping or in pain that we can tell - he can really move it when he feels like it. We've tried treat luring - which works for the distance it takes to get to the treat. We do lots of upbeat cajolling - and sometimes downright begging. Is this a puppy thing, a basset thing, or a Rooney thing? Any ideas on how to teach him to move on out on our walks?

As thanks in advance for all ideas, here are a few puppy pictures (I'm new to posting, so if the links don't work I will try again):
[attachment=553:rooneyball2.jpg]

[attachment=554:rooneygrass2.jpg]

[attachment=552:rooneyporch2.jpg]
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
173 Posts
Rooney is a LOOKER!

Sorry, I have no advice on the walks. I'm sure someone else will have some great advice. I just wanted to chime in and say how cute he is and welcome you-- have lots of fun!

Colleen
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,902 Posts
Can't offer advice on the peat moss, but have a thought about the walkies. At 14 wks, he's still learning to walk on a leash, and during leash breaking, puppies often behave just as you have described. With experience and more training, he should improve. Sounds like you're doing all the right things; just keep a sense of humor and be patient. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,219 Posts
Welcome! What a gorgeous puppy!
As far as the peat moss goes, I would call the manufacturer and ask them if their product is harmful to dogs. You could also check with your vet to see what they say. We had red stones in our front yard and when Yogi was a puppy he would always swipe one on the way in and out of the house! :lol: He didn't like to eat them but instead would toss them up in the air and play with them. Needless to say I was ever watchful of him, always taking them away. Eventually he outgrew his fascination with stones. So whatever you decide to use supervision will be key.
Looking forward to seeing more pictures! We never get enough pictures on Cyberhound.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,244 Posts
Rooney is so cute! I have no advice...just wanted to welcome you to the world of bassets! You'll probably love it and never turn back! :) I can't see myself having any other dogs...bassets are just wonderful!

~Heather
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
157 Posts
Welcome!

I'd say its pretty typical young and stubborn basset behavior. It will get better as he gets older, but you will need to teach him how to do it. I actually just took a loose leash walking seminar at a dog obedience club this week. All of the methods were more or less the same, except they started with teaching them inside where there are less distractions, and try to enforce it outside. The method that seemed to work best for my basset was one where you start off facing the dog. Have a lot of treats ready in your hand, but don't show them to the pup. What has been repeated to me the most, though I don't always follow, is not to show the dog the treat when teaching them an action like walking on a leash. It teaches them to follow their nose, not to come or be next to you. Anyway, so you start walking backwards. Each time the dog takes a step to follow you, you give him a treat and say "Good Dog" or "Yes" or whatever your reward word is (or even a clicker I guess). If he's right up next to you, you can give it to him directly, if there is some space, toss it on the ground between you. As he keeps following you, keep saying the reward word when he first steps towards you, but withhold the treat until he's taken two or three steps towards you. Keep doing this until he's walking right in front of you, and then turn around and keep the process going.

I've only been doing this for a couple of days, but I do see some improvement!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,865 Posts
Rooney is adordable! I have no real advice, just wanted to say I laughed at your description of Rooney & how he "plops his butt down." As a pup, Spencer did the same thing. With patience & persistance, he got over it & we took enthusiastic walks for many years. Now at age 12, he's back to "plopping his butt down" again and refusing to walk. We've come full circle! :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
932 Posts
Roony is adorable. I also have a dog who went through a mulch eating stage. I ended up with black landscape cloth covered with pine needles. The dogs seem to have no interest in the needles. We have pines in our yard.......I'm not sure where else you could get them. Have fun with your new baby!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,957 Posts
We've tried treat luring - which works for the distance it takes to get to the treat.[/b]

REWARDS, LURES & BRIBES
What is the difference between a reward, a lure and a bribe? Explanations & tips.[/b]

I think after reading the article you will find that you are not luring the dog but attempting to bribe him. Problem is with this techniques is little to no learning is going on, and the Learning that is occuring is not something you are going to want to be happening.
what the puppy is learning
1. going on strike get me a treat
2. show me the money make them show whats in it for me before I decide what to do


By changing up what you are doing just slightly you make a powerful change in the dynamic Do not wait for a problem to occur before pulling out the food. Instead Right when you start off and the dog is moving briskly by your side bend down with a treat while still moving forward and give it to the dog. if in another couple step the dog is still doing what you want repeat. If not wait until he is and reward again.
Because the reward is given exactly when the dog is doing what we want they will qiuckly associate that behavior with getting a reward. When using positive reinforcement or any other operant conditioner for that matter timing is critical you have a second at most for the dog to associate the reward with the behavior.

You do not mention training gear, and for the most part what you use in not as imporant as how you train and how the gear relates to that. With puppies especially young ones I do no like collars for leash training at this age. IMHO even with flat buckle ones the risk of a throat injury is to high. Head halter are also high risk for neck injury. I prefer a traditional harness provide forging and pulling are not an issue. If they are a traditional harness general makes it worse. A training harness/halter is a better choice for puppies that tend to pull. The are a couple basic varieties like the "sense-able harness" which is good for new age trainer that do not want to use pain and the more traditional sporn training halter that is able to administer a "correction" for more traditional trainer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
272 Posts
well, seems like you've got plenty of advice, so i just wanted to tell you how cute your little guy is. I love the picture of his tongue hanging out!!!
Welcome aboard!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Wow! Thank you all so, so much - for the advice, and for the compliments (we'll take credit even if we didn't have much to do with how cute he is). Although for every adorable, angelic moment, we seem to see lots more of this:

[attachment=555:rooneycouch.jpg]
 

Attachments

1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top