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Hi Everyone. I just joined. Here is a picture of my Piddles, which was taken about a month ago. She's a Lemon Basset and is a little over 6 months old. She's doing really wonderful on the potty training. I wonder if it is because I work from home and she's never alone for very long. She has a Beagle sister and two cat brothers. I clean her ears each night with baby wipes and she gets a bath about once a week or so. Piddles stays in an Excersize Pen when I'm working and sleeps very nicely in her crate at night. I haven't experienced any of the drooling I've read about. Does that come when they get older? She's been a great pup. No problems at all.
 

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Welcome! She's a cutie, not to mention a lucky girl having the slave home all day!

Some bassets never drool and some produce gallons of it! Several of mine are champion droolers - I don't know what I'd do if I wasn't covered with slobber & wiping it off something!

Now we need tales of terror....there must be at least one!
 

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Welcome! She is adorable.

My boy is 1 year and he is my first basset hound. He doesn't drool too much... usually just when he is excited.
 

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I haven't experienced any of the drooling I've read about[/b]
One of the biggest fasters in the amount of drool is the looseness of the flews. Female in general are tighter mouthed than males and puppies are as well. None of the females I have had are much of droolers Toughy the male however made up for it. Especial after he had to have a molar removed.


I wonder if it is because I work from home and she's never alone for very long.[/b]
One of the keys to successful potty training is minimizing accidents. IMHO one of the reason that basset are harder to potty train than many other breeds is because they are slower to mature in the area of sphnicter control. Often owners assume that a lack of accident means the dog has learn control when it reality the success was not do the dog having better or adequite control but just better management by the owner. This is especial true of dogs that have never had to exersize that much self control in this area because some is alway there to let them out.

The other problem area that can pop is that the dog and the human never learn or teach each other a clear signal that the dog need to go out. Rather than waiting for the dog to some how miraculously come up with a signal you understand, many find it much easer to teach a dog a signal from the start

see House Training: Ring My Bell!
 

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Welcome! Piddles is adorable!
As far as drooling goes, my boy, Yogi doesn't drool hardly at all. I think some hounds just drool more than others.
 

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Piddles is absolutely beautfiul! :) Rusty & Stickers are littermates. Stickers doesn't drool much at all. Rusty, on the other hand is a huge drooler. Always has a wet mouth. It makes it difficult to control the dreaded "Lip Fold Pyoderma"! :angry:
 

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What a cutie you have! My Sadie (ATB) rarely drooled. I need to follow Spencer around with a mop. ;)
 

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Welcome! Piddles sure is a cutie-pie! It sounds like she is a very sweet-natured and easy-going girl. I'm curious though... is Piddles her real name or just a nick-name? My daughter's Dachshund is sometimes called 'piddley-pup' because of her habit of rolling onto her back and peeing when she gets excited. :p

It sounds like you're both off to a great start together. While many people manage to raise puppies quite well while working outside the home, it's great if you are fortunate enough to be able to stay at home with the pup. I was lucky enough to be able to stay at home and I am VERY thankful that I was. My Moe (a rescue pup) was a handful with many issues. I can't imagine that our outcome could have been as wonderful as it was if I couldn't devote nearly ALL my time to him in the beginning. I am not in any way criticizing anyone who works - I applaud anyone who can handle a job AND the commitment and stress of training, caring for, and nurturing a pup, as many wonderful pet owners do.

My Moe has always had a relatively dry mouth, except when he is smelling new smells, like when we're out walking or if we meet new people. He generally doesn't drool in the house but he does "leak" all over the place when he drinks. :lol: My friend has had many Bassets and they ranged from being very drooly to being dry-mouthed. Their activity levels ranged wildly, too - from insane to bossy to lovable to independent to goofy to smart. Her littlest, Zelda, is the sweetest-tempered and most easy-going Basset I have ever met (but she has a bit of the adventuring wanderer in her, resulting in a few scares :eek: ).

Anyway, welcome and we look forward to hearing more about Piddles as she grows up.

Terry
 

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I'm not sure how the name of Piddles stuck. We originally named her Nell. Perhaps it was the sound of her feet. There were some piddle accidents at first. But, really, it's been smooth sailing on the potty training. I can even say "Go Pee-Pee" when we are outside and she goes. She is an amazing little being.
I look forward to all the help I can get to ensure that she gets the best care.
Thanks!
 

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Glad to see you're getting along so well, because I hope to be doing the same in a couple of months. I've only raised two bassets from pups and their circumstances could not have been more different, but they ended up pretty similar.

Herman as a puppy spent about eight hours a day during the work week alone in the kitchen. We got him at eight weeks. He housetrained really fast. I kept newspapers by the back door and it seemed like only a matter of a few weeks before one day he just went to the back door and pawed it and from then on I don't remember any accidents. He was however a major chewer and we had to secure the house during his first year. He also was pretty rough on strangers and small children (we do not have children).

Harold I raised while telecommuting. We were rarely apart. He came into the household at a little over five months and at a time when I had three fosters and one fairly new but permanent coonhound. Harold took what seemed like a long time to housebreak, even though it probably wasn't more than a month or six weeks(?). I just assumed that a dog his age would have established better control and more smarts. He always was a bit of a squirter though, like when I would help him up into the car he would almost always squirt some pee. On the plus side he was an incredibly mellow pup who only gummed the edge of a rug if left alone. He would nod off on the vet's examining table. I always thought that was a great environment for him though, we would all walk around the property twice a day and then he would really pester the other dogs out back for quite a while before coming in for a midday snack and nap. Harold was always checking up on me though. It was a rare night that he would not come to the bedroom doorway to make sure I was safe in my bed before he would go back out to his in the living room. I remember the first time I travelled with him to go and auction off my in-laws possessions and I stayed in the living room with him in case he had to go out and he kept coming over and sticking his face in mine but every time I offered to put him out he declined. Just checking up on me. Harold was wary of strangers, but not mean, but he also viewed small children as play things.

I experienced pretty much none of the stuff that sometimes plague basset owners, like excessive shedding, drooling, or "houndie" smell. Herman later in life did have some bad inhalant allergies that caused his front paws to swell.

Anyway, keep up the good work. It's not all horror stories, I'll tell youl.
 
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