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To the OP: if all shots are up to date and you are ready to slowly introduce your basset to the big world around you, go for it. To encourage your baby to follow you keep a treat in your hand by your thigh but where the pup can see/smell it. As you walk, pup will follow. Occasionally use the treat as a reward for walking. A five minute walk around the block is in no way going to hurt the dog.
 

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Ok,I do not advise anyone with a puppy younger than at least 12 weeks to go out side their fenced yard too many diseases out there and the shots are not finished till 16 weeks of age.At the age of 16 weeks the puppy should be use to a collar and dragged a leash around at home. When you want to go for a walk(short a block and back) put collar and leash on start walking ,besure the collar will be snug enough that it will not slip over the dog's head, the puppy will probably resist at first,when that happens and they start struggling against you,pulling backwards,stand still ,do not go one way or the other ,let him struggle,soon enough he will figure out the only way to go is the way you are going,this could happen several times before they decide it isn't so bad. Now for my 2 cents,maybe I don't know more than the UK kennel club but after 20+ years in raising bassets I know what is better for my dogs than they do and I do not advise taking a puppy or dog up to a year in age for long(5 blocks or more) walks.I believe it isn't good for the joints but I do not believe that walks by themselves make a dogs legs crooked,most times, and if it is a pet bred by someone who likes to think they are a "breeder" generally I would not be surprised to find there is a genitic aspet to their problem,not always, can be nutritional.Our show dogs are our pets but if we have a litter and a puppy has a fault such as,a high ear set ,it will be sold as a "pet"," companion puppy",because we feel it should not be shown,or bred.These pet puppies are far less likely to develop the kinds of leg problem that has been mentioned, unless they blatently take the dog for a hike, because we breed to improve our dogs not to just supply puppies to people.We care how we breed dogs ,not only that they are pleasing to the eye , look like they are suppose to by the standard,but the structure and bone development are equally important to us. We take great care to supply every puppy owner with the tools it will take to raise a puppy that fits the family and stays healthy.
 

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Pet stock, 'don't understand ' is the care due to a pet any different that a show dog?
It shouldn't be but not all people want a puppy to show so they buy a substandard basset from a substandard breeder which would be considered by reputable breeders, "pet
stock" because all they want to breed are pets to sell and even though the people who buy the pup may take good care of the puppy it could be pre-disposed to develop problems and those "pet stock" puppies are not usually bred by those who give a good &$#% what happens to the puppy once it leaves them.We take the best care of all our puppies Pet quality or show potential puppies.
 

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Ok,I do not advise anyone with a puppy younger than at least 12 weeks to go out side their fenced yard too many diseases out there and the shots are not finished till 16 weeks of age
This is contrary to the recommendations of The AVSAB Position Statement on Socializastion
Because the first three months are the period when sociability outweighs fear, this is the primary window of opportunity for puppies to adapt to new people, animals, and experiences. Incomplete or im-proper socialization during this important time can increase the risk of behavioral problems later in life including fear, avoidance, and/or aggression. Behavioral problems are the greatest threat to the owner-dog bond. In fact, behavioral problems are the num- ber one cause of relin- quishment to shelters.3 Behavioral issues, not infectious diseases, are the number one cause of death for dogs under three years of age. While puppies’ im-mune systems are still developing during these early months, the combination of maternal immunity, primary vac- cination, and appropriate care makes the risk of infection relatively small compared to the chance of death from a behavior problem.
Many of the chronic problem in health care like asthma and allergires are caused or increased by creating to sterile of an environment We are doing a disservice to puppies and children by creating to sterile a living environment


The 5 minutes per month rule is a UK and it donminion exclusive. and not followeb by any one else. It is also import to point out it is 5 Minute for each month upto twice a day so that is 2 - 15 minute bouts of exercise bet day and this is in addition to normal play activities and including them which is where the confusion come it how some interpret the guidlines which are not factually based ot scientifical based it must be pointed out but just Opinion.

see Exercise in Puppies-Are there rules?

The research evidence, then, really does not provide anything like a definitive answer to questions about the effects of exercise in growing puppies. Common sense suggests that forcing a dog to exercise heavily when it does not wish to is not a good idea. Likewise, puppies sometimes have more enthusiasm than sense and can exercise to the point of heat exhaustion, blistered footpads, and other damage that may be less obvious. Therefore, a general principle of avoiding forced or voluntary extreme exercise is reasonable, but specific and absolute statements about what kind of exercise is allowed, what surfaces puppies should or should not exercise on, and so forth is merely opinion not supported by objective data. Such opinions may very well be informed by personal experience, and they may be reliable, but any opinion not founded on objective data must always be taken with a grain of salt and accepted provisionally until such data is available.
 

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All I can say about all this get them out early/don't get them out early is none of my puppies went off our property, either here or in Canada, before they had ALL their vaccination. And although we had some who were not happy to be shown, in which case they stayed at home (no point trying if they didn't like it as far as I'm concerned), the vast majority of our puppies were as sound as a bell temperamentally. And showed no adverse reaction to not being out there from a very early age.

Further, there's a world of difference between dragging a puppy around on a hard surface before it's ready, and just allowing a puppy out on the street to get used to the sight and sound of traffic. Common sense!!

As for European, British and N.American Bassets - years ago the American Basset used to be big, heavy and low to the ground. On the other hand, British (not European note) Bassets were lighter, and far more up on the leg. In recent years, it's become the reverse. Not in any small part caused by the importation, and use, of Dutch bloodlines in the UK. In Holland particularly, their hounds have been huge and for me, overdone, for many years now - perhaps because the Basset Artesian Normand is shown as a separate breed in Holland, and is lighter and more on the leg. So their Bassets have been bred away from that look. In the UK, efforts are being made to return the breed to a more sensible, unexaggerated look - and the Breed Standard has been re-worded to emphasise this - not altered fundamentally, just changing the wording in those areas where too much has appeared. It's going to take some generations before a return to a more sensible looking Basset (fit for purpose?) happens, but it is a start.

I think American Bassets, as seen in the ring, have been produced to be less heavy because of this generic trend to have all breeds flying round the ring. Although for sure, there is a difference in this, between those hounds bred on the West Coast, and those in the East Coast, the former still being rather heavier?

I have no idea about the 'UK 5 minutes per month rule' - and I'm British and have bred as many litters here, as we did in Canada!!
 

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there has much been made of hard surfaces vs soft surface. While it is always frought with danger comparing between species contrarly to popular belief it appear to be no reduction in injury risk running on soft surfaces,

Running surface and injuries: The role of leg stiffness in running injuries

However, large-scale scientific studies haven’t found any connection between how much of your running is on hard vs. soft surfaces and injury rates.1

...1. Marti, B.; Vader, J. P.; Minder, C. E.; Abelin, T., On the epidemiology of running injuries-the 1984 Bern Grand-Prix study. The American Journal of Sports Medicine 1988, 16 (3), 285-294.
Running on Hard Surfaces may be Better than Running on Soft Surfaces
 

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Ok probably shouldn't have sounded so stringent with the age/walking thing.Socialization is most important WHICH the breeder should have started in her/his home before you get the puppy. I have my husband play with the puppies because they get use to hearing a man's low voice which can often be scary to a puppy. You can do alot of socialization in your own home and yard before getting to the point of taking a puppy for walks,have neighborhood kids over(not too many at one time ) to pet and play gently.Encourage the children to be calm not too excitable or the puppy will be excited and may be nippy with the kids,just playing,have them roll a ball or throw the toys to play. Calm is the word here. have relatives come to your yard and do the same thing with them,don't be afraid to bang some pots and pans while cooking he will get use to the noise.When you finally do take him for walks the world won't be so scary,there will be some things that do and he will look to you for a response,just say,"What is that?" Encourage him to be curious about things(that won't hurt him) you'll be surprised how well adjusted it makes them.
 

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Personally I take my pups out before they had their second jabs (at around 9 weeks). Obviously with caution about where - not an area where lots of dogs are/have been. Parvo or distemper can easily be brought into the home on human feet or by another dog. I live in the middle of a city and socialisation - far beyond hoovers, toilets flushing, just day to day stuff in the home and in their garden etc...- is hugely important and to me getting them accustomed to the real world is paramount in that first 12 weeks. I walk my puppies (for short times) on the pavement with traffic going by and take them for longer walks with my adult dogs in a wagon (well a bit more than just a wagon :D) so they don't miss out. I believe in a 5 minute a month guideline for walks but it is as important to do it as it is to limit their walks. You should build their muscles slowly with walking and I get them on a lead and start training asap - it's never too early. Playtime is completely different - that's up to them or until I need some time out :). I'm a huge fan of Ian Dunbar and according to him your puppy should meet at least 100 people and about as many other puppies/dogs by the t he time they're 3 months old. Good early socialisation really makes a huge difference with potential/possible behavioural problems. FWIW mine are pretty much bomb proof, unless we rearrange the furniture or turn our bicycles upside down - that's a big deal with them. :D
 

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FM The Netherlands changed the standard a couple years ago to the same as the (new) UK standard. Will be interesting at Crufts as there are a lot of (more) Dutch entrees. ;)
 

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Each breeder has different things they do with their puppies to socialize them. My guys have never had a problem adjusting to their new homes and they usually leave my house for the first time to go to their new homes,barring Vet visits. I won't get into a pissing match with anyone.we all may do it a bit different but we all want the same results.
 

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I think Maddie's anxiety issues are due in part to perhaps not being socialized enough when she was young. We just didn't expose her to enough experiences, I guess.
 

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Each breeder has different things they do with their puppies to socialize them. My guys have never had a problem adjusting to their new homes and they usually leave my house for the first time to go to their new homes,barring Vet visits. I won't get into a pissing match with anyone.we all may do it a bit different but we all want the same results.
I'd totally agree with this - and further, each breeder knows (or should know) what works best with their bloodline when it comes to getting a puppy through the puppy stages sound, both physically and mentally eh.:cool:
 

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I think Maddie's anxiety issues are due in part to perhaps not being socialized enough when she was young. We just didn't expose her to enough experiences, I guess.
any behavior/personality characteristic is part Nature and part enviroment and how much a role either had to play in any particular characteristic is speculation.
 

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well i m no expert so have not much to add except that yeah i went on my first hike at about 14 months... and it wuz fun!! mestill likes to hike and go billygoating lots (run up and down hills). me didn't jump until after a year old, and more like at 2 yrs old.

re: the OP.... yeah i wuz the same way. had to take walks to go potty (in apartment and can't go in there). i would often not walk where my person wuz walking that's fer sure! i didn't seem like i enjoyed walks. i dunno how the stoopid leash thing wurks. i walks in opposite direction, i flat bassets on the ground, i wanted to return home on my walks. my person said what a weirdo i am for not wanting to be outside and not wanting to take walks.

WELL all that changed at some point (a warning to ya lol!) and now I luvs going outside, and now I do the PULLING the person around, not the other way around. in fact i'm really good at leash pulling :D

your puppy will learn and figure it out at some point. it just takes time (like months and months) and then it will turn around. bwahahahaha!!

also, this is just us, but becuz we had a doxie with neck/back problems and we were told to stop using a collar, i never been walked with a collar, just a harness. i would personally not yank very hard on that collar. we like harness better becuz it distributes the force more evenly and not just to neck area.
--Worm :cool:
 
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